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View Full Version : sitting trot "straps you in" aid



staceyk
Oct. 4, 2010, 11:21 PM
Hi, In some dressage or riding publication I know I saw an ad for an aid that seemed to "strap you in" to the saddle to teach sitting trot. Does anyone remember the name of the product?

Stacey

citydog
Oct. 4, 2010, 11:31 PM
:no:

flshgordon
Oct. 4, 2010, 11:41 PM
It's called the Unisit. Actually a very cool product.

It does not teach you to sit the trot, nor does it really strap you in. If you can't hold yourself still & straight, it will release itself. But it is very useful if you want to feel the correct way to use your seat.

atr
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:53 AM
I'm with flshgordon on this one... used it twice, with great skepticism, I might say, maybe 12 years ago, with a rather good clinician, had an "Oh, now I get it" moment, and have been able to sit the trot perfectly comfortably ever since. Much less painful for all the horses in between than my trying to get it on the longe line (and for me...)

staceyk
Oct. 5, 2010, 07:42 AM
Hi,

How would you describe it safety wise? If the horse bucked, or tripped would the device release?

Valentina_32926
Oct. 5, 2010, 10:58 AM
Hi,

How would you describe it safety wise? If the horse bucked, or tripped would the device release?

Yes - cause a safety quick release is on your wrist.

It helped me feel my mares bouncy trot but KILLED my back in her canter which is very expressive, so I sold mine. Forgot to add - you need a groundsperson to put it on since it attaches to the girth.

HiyoSilver
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:14 PM
I knew an instructor who had one a few years ago. The people who rode in it did report such "AHA!" moments after a few uses and then it was no longer needed. Watching, it did not look safe, because it looks as though it straps you on, but the more common problem was that people would be slightly unsteady with their hands and the wrist strap safety release opened and the device fell away from them and had to be re-fastened.

This seemed to happen about every 5 minutes. It took a few minutes to re-attach and re-adjust. The instructor who used the device also only used it on the longe.

As I recall, it was quite expensive for what it was- a few straps of nylon and a couple of aluminum release catches- I think it was around $150, but for an instructor it was another good tool to save her school horse's back from repeated pounding. Instead, it seems the students felt the pounding in THEIR backs more and learned to go with the motion better than just plain old longe lessons.

pharmgirl
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:28 PM
For that kind of money, I would just buy a pair of full seat FITS instead. I have found it so much easier to sit when wearing those :).

jackalini
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:36 PM
HiYo Silver - I don't recall, when the release was triggered, that anything fell off or anything dangerous. You just were no longer "strapped in."

To me, that release for the hands is a GOOD thing - what good is feeling what it is to properly sit the trot if your hands are all over the place? The wrist release strap gave easily 12 inches of slack from where it was tied in at the pommel-area of the saddle. And if you came to a situation where you perhaps needed more range of motion with your hands, I imagine you'd prefer to no longer be strapped to the horse. ;)

I've been lucky to get to ride with one a couple of times, it was really neat - definitely the AHA moments everyone talks about. It taught me a lot while allowing the horse some relief from my "learning efforts."

flshgordon
Oct. 5, 2010, 11:59 PM
Yes - cause a safety quick release is on your wrist.

It helped me feel my mares bouncy trot but KILLED my back in her canter which is very expressive, so I sold mine. Forgot to add - you need a groundsperson to put it on since it attaches to the girth.

Actually I don't think it is designed for you to canter in it on purpose. My mare cantered in it once when I tried to get her to lengthen and that was NOT comfortable! But only a couple strides.

Yes you need a helper of sorts, definitely can't attach it yourself.

mtngirl
Oct. 7, 2010, 02:00 AM
I've used the Unisit several times and never had a problem with the wrist strap disconnecting. I think it has a lot to do with how you carry/hold your hands. The safety feature definitely works though...I've gotten off balanced on purpose just to see if would work and it did...just exactly as it said it would.

Definitely a two person piece of equipment, and I agree, canter is not very comfortable using it, but it most definitely gave me that "AHA...that's what it's suppose to feel like!" moment. I think it's a good training tool.

Sandra6500
Oct. 7, 2010, 04:19 PM
Years ago they had the demo at World Cup in Vegas and I sat in it. I thought it felt weird and hated the restriction, but could see were it would be helpful to a rank beginner. It sort of straps your legs down- which is good I guess, but true stability in the seat comes from your core obviously.

The sales person was telling everyone that she was an "UPPER LEVEL RIDER!!!" (her emphasis not mine) and used it all the time to help her with tempis. I was shooed away when I asked her if she didn't feel that perhaps people should learn to sit the canter before schooling tempis. :D

So I dunno. Not my cup of tea but I could see it being helpful to beginners. As an FYI you can rent them as well.