PDA

View Full Version : Another Bloody Mouth



ToN Farm
Oct. 1, 2010, 08:40 PM
This time it's an event horse.

http://eventingnation.com/home/2010/10/french-horse.html

NOMIOMI1
Oct. 1, 2010, 08:44 PM
Funny story.

A friend of mine accidentally fed a horse licorice before his test and was asked to leave due to red lips. They let her come back in at a later ride time once it was explained, but I couldnt tell what was redder. My friends face or the horses mouth!

shawneeAcres
Oct. 1, 2010, 08:48 PM
I was a steward at a USEF dressage show about a month ago, and one thing I had to do was check bits. One horse alarmed me, until I realized it was pieces of carrot I was seeing, not blood!

wsmoak
Oct. 1, 2010, 09:05 PM
I was a steward at a USEF dressage show about a month ago, and one thing I had to do was check bits. One horse alarmed me, until I realized it was pieces of carrot I was seeing, not blood!

I was trail riding once and passed another rider who admired Patrick and then asked, "Does he always bleed at the mouth like that?"

:eek: I leaned over to look and realized he was drooling carrot bits all over the place. whew!

esdressage
Oct. 1, 2010, 09:15 PM
I keep very small slices of carrot in a pouch often when I work my mare, because she doesn't like sugar cubes but I like to lean forward and reward her with a treat when she's good. The carrot bits seem to be her favorite.

At the end of our rides, she often has orange-crumble-saliva-froth coming out of her mouth. I've had people ask me several times what was coming out of her mouth… guess I'd better be careful?!? lol

horsepoor
Oct. 1, 2010, 11:06 PM
My horse was at his last show of the year with trainer and I didn't think much about bringing him a treat of fresh picked blackberries from home. Then I noticed the red/purple lips and thankfully thought about cleaning it all up before sending them into the ring. That would have been terribly embarrassing, having him called out for blackberry juice (and he's got white lips, so he kind of looked like he had lipstick on). I would have never lived that one down...

MySparrow
Oct. 1, 2010, 11:13 PM
What's with the hand position of that rider?

HFSH
Oct. 1, 2010, 11:16 PM
Too many peppermints can make the mouth foam pink. Thankfully you can smell the mint !

angel
Oct. 2, 2010, 12:08 AM
sparrow....the hands are the least of the problems. However, since you asked, this rider has a flaw that is typical of many of us in that his left hand has rotated slightly inward. The reason comes from a left shoulder that wants to rotate toward the right hand side. In the horse, we call this balance flaw "hollow right."

Fixerupper
Oct. 2, 2010, 12:34 AM
Another bloody mouth

This time it's an event horse.


don't get me wrong...I'm good with funny stories and alternate explanations for 'red' mouths on horses....
I just think it's a bit telling that no one is blaming it on evil riding practices of the event riders

as compared to the diatribes (bitter, sharply abusive denunciations) in The Press and The Tongue Biting Incident, WTH thread... against top the dressage riders

things that make you go ....hmmmmm

:winkgrin:

alibi_18
Oct. 2, 2010, 04:31 AM
And the horse is not in RK position on the pictures?! What a shame...how dare did the photographer missed it!!!
Actually I wonder why there is no one screaming yet at the reiners...(and not just because Anky is there...) as I've seen such practice way more than often in the western's disciplines...

NoDQhere
Oct. 2, 2010, 09:56 AM
And the horse is not in RK position on the pictures?! What a shame...how dare did the photographer missed it!!!
Actually I wonder why there is no one screaming yet at the reiners...(and not just because Anky is there...) as I've seen such practice way more than often in the western's disciplines...

I've asked this question as well. Dressage is under such a microscope, but nothing is said about the reiners with their noses in the dirt. It doesn't take a lot of imagination to figure out how the riders get those heads so low.........:no:

Pcostx
Oct. 2, 2010, 10:17 AM
All I know is if I rode with my hands/arms in that position, my instructor would be ALL over me!:eek:

Bluey
Oct. 2, 2010, 10:27 AM
I've asked this question as well. Dressage is under such a microscope, but nothing is said about the reiners with their noses in the dirt. It doesn't take a lot of imagination to figure out how the riders get those heads so low.........:no:


You don't need much imagination to see that, watch them longe them.
Some lines of reining horses in the last decade are naturally low headed, run around like that turned out and at play.

It is disconcerting when first learning to rein today, that you have a headless horse in front of you.
I have seen a well bred reining colt, his first ride under saddle, carry himself with that low head.
Trainer was very happy, said the ones bred right are practically broke to ride and do naturally what reining horses do and are judged by.

I do wish that they didn't LET them carry their heads quite so low, teached them to at least put it where they don't look like they are riding blind, it does look kind of silly.
Judges are supposed to see past that low head fad to the best performance, that is the most correct, smooth and free moving horse without resistences, no matter where the head is middle or low, althoug stargazing IS a fault.

ToN Farm
Oct. 2, 2010, 10:42 AM
All I know is if I rode with my hands/arms in that position, my instructor would be ALL over me!:eek:
He's got the reins so short that he has to ride with a straight arm. It looks bad. I think the horse is quite nice and doing a good medium trot in spite of the contact.

Bluey
Oct. 2, 2010, 10:50 AM
And the horse is not in RK position on the pictures?! What a shame...how dare did the photographer missed it!!!
Actually I wonder why there is no one screaming yet at the reiners...(and not just because Anky is there...) as I've seen such practice way more than often in the western's disciplines...

I was surprised no one seemed to have brought that before.

Yes, many reiners do travel with way overbent necks, in their quest to score high for controlled flexibility.
The difference with dressage's RK is that the horse does so naturally, with help from training, no one is holding their heads down there, pushing with seats into receiving that energy in your hands and holding the horse there.

All you have to do is to watch the warm-up.
You will rarely see anyone reining holding a horse's head in RK, they bump the bit a hair if a horse's attention is wandering, that's all.
Reining horses are truly self carrying horses, hold themselves collected to a great degree on their own and that kind of collection tends to become overbent necks in some.
They still ride in front of your leg and not on the forehand, so that the neck looks overbent is secondary to how the horse is working.

I consider that way overbent way so many of today's reiners move to be bred into them, a result of breeding for all characteristics that were sought in those horses.
Watch RFD-TV reining show ads of reining stallions running around in their paddocks at the big stallion stations and you will clearly see how those horses move like that naturally.

I agree that it is too much and distracts from a good performance, but then, I am not judging.;)

not again
Oct. 2, 2010, 10:54 AM
"Too many peppermints can make the mouth foam pink. Thankfully you can smell the mint !"

Peppermints can cause your horse to fail a drug test, so don't feed them while competing.

alibi_18
Oct. 2, 2010, 12:41 PM
I was surprised no one seemed to have brought that before.

Yes, many reiners do travel with way overbent necks, in their quest to score high for controlled flexibility.
The difference with dressage's RK is that the horse does so naturally, with help from training, no one is holding their heads down there, pushing with seats into receiving that energy in your hands and holding the horse there.

All you have to do is to watch the warm-up.
You will rarely see anyone reining holding a horse's head in RK, they bump the bit a hair if a horse's attention is wandering, that's all.
Reining horses are truly self carrying horses, hold themselves
collected to a great degree on their own and that kind of collection tends to become overbent necks in some.
They still ride in front of your leg and not on the forehand, so that the neck looks overbent is secondary to how the horse is
working.

I consider that way overbent way so many of today's reiners move to be bred into them, a result of breeding for all characteristics that were sought in those horses.
Watch RFD-TV reining show ads of reining stallions running around in their paddocks at the big stallion stations and you will clearly see how those horses move like that naturally.

I agree that it is too much and distracts from a good performance, but then, I am not judging.;)

Can I just disagree? Western training is far and foremost way more 'disturbing' than any dressage training I've seen so far... Just mentionning 'Tie-down' and 20pound bits...
Go check videos of the Weg reining champs, see how happy these horses in the videos, when backing up, mouth open, seem to be...yeah I'm sure it's
training was delicate and they do back up nicely like that freely with such head set....and not mentionning these horses are also more then often started at 18 months, with those big guys on board!
Just some food for thoughts....

alibi_18
Oct. 2, 2010, 12:53 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mj7n83qIF64&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Ahah! just learn a new trick on my Iphone!!!

Bluey
Oct. 2, 2010, 04:37 PM
Can I just disagree? Western training is far and foremost way more 'disturbing' than any dressage training I've seen so far... Just mentionning 'Tie-down' and 20pound bits...
Go check videos of the Weg reining champs, see how happy these horses in the videos, when backing up, mouth open, seem to be...yeah I'm sure it's
training was delicate and they do back up nicely like that freely with such head set....and not mentionning these horses are also more then often started at 18 months, with those big guys on board!
Just some food for thoughts....

Well, some of that is impressions.
I have talked to some reiners that, after seeing their first dressage competition, they grimace and say, are those horses really that hard mouthed and barely broke, do they always show with so much stress showing, straining like they do?

Sure, you can bash any discipline for some someone does at any one time.
If the horse backs up with gaping open mouth, they will get points taken off for that, as they do for so much else that may show some tension.

As for using heavy bits, I saw that for the first time this summer, seems to be one more stupid gadget some may use, along with draw reins and assorted tools any trainer may have in their tool box.

I agree, reining is not a perfect sport and, being one of the newer ones and still in trainsition, it has a long way to go.

There is plenty in some disciplines I don't like either, each one of us comes from a different background, but we should understand the world is not run to please us.
If you don't like it, don't look.;)
Different strokes and such...:yes:

carolprudm
Oct. 2, 2010, 05:40 PM
I consider that way overbent way so many of today's reiners move to be bred into them, a result of breeding for all characteristics that were sought in those horses.
Watch RFD-TV reining show ads of reining stallions running around in their paddocks at the big stallion stations and you will clearly see how those horses move like that naturally.

I agree that it is too much and distracts from a good performance, but then, I am not judging.;)

I have to say that i was very impressed by the way the reiners walked into the arena on a loose rein and waited calmly until it was time to start their test, did their thing and walked out on a loose rein.

The energy was turned on and off as needed.