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View Full Version : AS we know, even the best fall!yet still no helmets



Carol Ames
Sep. 27, 2010, 10:46 PM
“I walked her, Nadine, Saturday and worked her lightly, and when I walked back to the stable she was really relaxed and just on long rein,” he said. “I came around the corner, and she slipped with her back legs out behind her and fell on her knees, and we sort of fell over. It was quite scary.”

TheHorseProblem
Sep. 28, 2010, 10:23 PM
I saw a link to this NYT article over in Off Course.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/29/sports/29helmets.html?src=twt&twt=n

I know people on this board are tired of debating the issue, but it did make the Times!

CFFarm
Sep. 29, 2010, 07:54 AM
No debate. Unless it is required people will continue to ride without helmets. It's like seat belts. People will be stupid and lives will be lost or serious injuries occurring. Like riding with gloves, once you become accustomed to wearing a helmet, you feel naked without one. As always, JMHO

doccer
Sep. 29, 2010, 10:30 AM
No debate. Unless it is required people will continue to ride without helmets. It's like seat belts. People will be stupid and lives will be lost or serious injuries occurring. Like riding with gloves, once you become accustomed to wearing a helmet, you feel naked without one. As always, JMHO

Oh jeezus... riding horses is dangerous... they buck, bolt, step on you, run you into trees, bite, get scared and do someting dumb...

helmets are precautionary, if you're dead you're dead. Get over it and quit trying to save everyone. Some just arent worth saving ;)

I apologize CFFarm, i didnt meant to take it out on you. But there are some other people that take the helmet debate too far...

Carol Ames
Sep. 29, 2010, 12:19 PM
h jeezus... riding horses is dangerous... they buck, bolt, step on you, run you into trees, bite, get scared and do someting dumb...

Sandra6500
Sep. 29, 2010, 01:51 PM
Quote from the article:

“I’m a proponent for helmet use, but it’s totally up to the individual,” King Dye said in an e-mail typed with her left hand.

Even Courtney recognized its a personal decision. Maybe you all should follow in her foot steps.

Madeline
Sep. 29, 2010, 02:01 PM
Quote from the article:

“I’m a proponent for helmet use, but it’s totally up to the individual,” King Dye said in an e-mail typed with her left hand.

Even Courtney recognized its a personal decision. Maybe you all should follow in her foot steps.

Consider the source.

Sandra6500
Sep. 29, 2010, 03:24 PM
What the heck is that suppose to mean?

Madeline
Sep. 29, 2010, 03:36 PM
Well, it's a suggestion that "helmet use is personal" from someone who has very recently suffered a major head injury, causing significant( and probably permanent) disruption of her life and the lives of those around her. I'm not a big advocate of blaming the victim, but I certainly am not going to listen to her advice on helmet-wearing, either.

mp
Sep. 29, 2010, 04:21 PM
Well, it's a suggestion that "helmet use is personal" from someone who has very recently suffered a major head injury, causing significant( and probably permanent) disruption of her life and the lives of those around her. I'm not a big advocate of blaming the victim, but I certainly am not going to listen to her advice on helmet-wearing, either.

Her statement implies that it's your choice. So, you're going to let someone else decide whether you wear a helmet or not?

OneGrayPony
Sep. 29, 2010, 04:23 PM
I think the thing that makes me sad about this, just like seatbelt laws, is that though sure, you should be allowed to wear whatever you'd like on your head (including glittery headbands with stars on boingy things - anyone remember those? sorry - went off into dreamland) - the caveat is that it does not only affect you.

That's right - your actions have effects on other people.

Want to know why it's so hard to find places to ride anymore? In addition to the fact that developments are popping up right and left, it's expensive as heck to get insurance, and the risk of liability from a horse and rider just crossing your field is high. Why is that? Because horseback riding is inherently unsafe - and insurance companies know that. Making it safer would go a long way toward reducing premiums - which is really based on a numeric calculation of number of deaths.

Same thing goes with seatbelt laws.

In addition, when a death or disability occurs, it is your loved ones who suffer, as well as the sport. We've just had a death in the family that was entirely preventable. Let me just tell you how much it sucks for those left behind. The person exercised his right to do whatever he wanted to do - that's for sure - but it didn't hurt just him.

I'm not saying that non-helmet-wearing should be illegal - but I'd be thinking about it differently if I were a non-helmet-wearer. Fortunately, my helmet has been glued to my head since I was a kid (way before the current studies go) because my Mom was a freakazoid about head injuries. Thank heavens, because I use my brain as my source of income!

gettingbettereveryday
Sep. 29, 2010, 05:58 PM
That's right - your actions have effects on other people.

Want to know why it's so hard to find places to ride anymore? In addition to the fact that developments are popping up right and left, it's expensive as heck to get insurance, and the risk of liability from a horse and rider just crossing your field is high. Why is that? Because horseback riding is inherently unsafe - and insurance companies know that. Making it safer would go a long way toward reducing premiums - which is really based on a numeric calculation of number of deaths.

This is probably the most sensible statement I've ever read about the helmet debate. Yes, we may already be dead if the horse bolts/bucks/spooks/rears hard enough, but a helmet can mitigate injuries and death in many cases.

On a personal note, I live with someone who suffered a traumatic brain injury (not equine related) about eight years ago. I can tell you that TBI brings its own special chaos not just to the person with the injury but to his or her family and friends as well. From the chronic headaches to the lack of impulse control to the bursts of unexplained anger, my husband is not the man I married. If I could turn back the clock and make him safer in the moment it happened, I would.

CFFarm
Sep. 29, 2010, 06:35 PM
What's the logic for NOT wearing a helmet?

Madeline
Sep. 29, 2010, 07:55 PM
What's the logic for NOT wearing a helmet?
Messes up your hair...

jenm
Sep. 29, 2010, 08:10 PM
What's the logic for NOT wearing a helmet?

It makes me look like a dork.

(not my words, I'm a confirmed helmet wearer). I just hear that from people I know who won't where helmets. In their minds their reason is perfectly logical.

chancellor2
Sep. 29, 2010, 08:47 PM
What's the logic for NOT wearing a helmet?

It just isn't DONE! Not from me but from others. I always wear my helmet now. CKD's Accident confirmed it for me.

SillyHorse
Sep. 29, 2010, 09:05 PM
Quote from the article:

“I’m a proponent for helmet use, but it’s totally up to the individual,” King Dye said in an e-mail typed with her left hand.

Even Courtney recognized its a personal decision. Maybe you all should follow in her foot steps.
No, thanks. Her footsteps led her to a TBI. Not a place I want to go. I have more sense than that.

Unfforgettable
Sep. 29, 2010, 09:29 PM
It makes me look like a dork.

(not my words, I'm a confirmed helmet wearer). I just hear that from people I know who won't where helmets. In their minds their reason is perfectly logical.

I hear that all the time. And I personally think sitting in a wheelchair, drooling, would make for a much dorkier look, especially given that one has the choice to avoid being in that chair.

Carol Ames
Sep. 29, 2010, 09:37 PM
The fall with permanent damage effects not only that rider :no:but, the entire equestrian community:sadsmile: including, 10 year old girls begging for riding lessons;:yes: I was once one of those ,fighting the image of horseback riding as being dangerous:eek: because of two high profile :confused:accidents in our area; look at the fallout continuing :mad:from Chris Reeves' fall:sadsmile:

Carol Ames
Sep. 30, 2010, 12:08 PM
mindful of ridings' classification by many as dangerous; the BIG picture; act locally:lol: and wear a helmet; lest you become "just another statistic:eek:"

Go Fish
Sep. 30, 2010, 02:26 PM
Quote from the article:

“I’m a proponent for helmet use, but it’s totally up to the individual,” King Dye said in an e-mail typed with her left hand.

Even Courtney recognized its a personal decision. Maybe you all should follow in her foot steps.

:(

Somehow, I'm not surprised.

Risk-Averse Rider
Oct. 3, 2010, 12:21 AM
Riders4Helmets requested that someone post this link to their Facebook page:

www.facebook.com/riders4helmets (http://www.facebook.com/riders4helmets)


I'm someone, so I posted it :yes:

culture shock
Oct. 3, 2010, 12:32 AM
on Facebook:

riders$helmets: www.facebook.com/riders4helmets

Sugar Maple
Oct. 3, 2010, 07:41 AM
Refusing to wear a helmet and risking a head injury is a very selfish and irresponsible decision. The ones who truly suffer...mentally, emotionally, physically and financially, are your loved ones who will be at your bedside or graveside...

katyb
Oct. 3, 2010, 08:53 AM
It makes me look like a dork.

(not my words, I'm a confirmed helmet wearer). I just hear that from people I know who won't where helmets. In their minds their reason is perfectly logical.


Drooling doesn't make a person all that attractive either. Same with the need for someone else to wipe your bottom. I'll stick with dorky. I spend my days in social security hearings, listening to one story after another about bad/careless decisions people have made that have ruined not only their own lives, but those of their family and friends. Additionally, they have become a liability to the public/taxpayers. It may be a personal choice, but it doesn't only affect the individual making the choice.

mishmash
Oct. 3, 2010, 09:04 AM
Work in emergency medicine. We always say-whether it be on a horse, motorcycle, whatever...not wearing a helmet is natural selection.:no: Sad, but true.....

sdlbredfan
Oct. 3, 2010, 09:06 AM
Refusing to wear a helmet and risking a head injury is a very selfish and irresponsible decision. The ones who truly suffer...mentally, emotionally, physically and financially, are your loved ones who will be at your bedside or graveside...

So true!
Jeanie (helmets are cheap, brains are priceless)

Tif_Ann
Oct. 3, 2010, 10:29 AM
I am sitting here on day 5 of a concussion from a fluke accident fall. The first thing my mother said to my sister on the phone was "I bet she wasn't wearing a helmet, right?" because having grown up in a rural area where helmets weren't even heard of, I've been the slowest in our family to adopt them. My sister didn't start riding until college, so helmets are just routine for her. Me, though ... eh, it's taken longer.

But I'm currently riding a 4 yr old and a 5 yr old, both pretty green - which means I wear a helmet on every ride. I was riding the 5 yr old when I fell, practicing Intro A, going from free walk to medium walk. Yeah. Intro ... and at the walk. She only has about 60 rides, and somehow between taking up the reins, asking her to bend into the corner, and preparing for the trot transition at C we cut it a little too close to the mounting block. Wouldn't have been a big deal but a whip was sticking out about a foot. The whip tanged in her back legs, she spooked and stepped up onto the mounting block with her right hind and pushed off and to the left. She kept her balance, but I was launched over her right shoulder. I twisted and actually saw her hip come up as she was stepping off :)

I hit the ground hard ... and my helmet cracked down the middle and caved in. (Not sure if I actually hit the wooden jump poles that were right there or not, I just know I hit my head.

If I had stuck to my normal "personal choice" of no helmet ... instead of being safe and smart ... well, I'd probably be in the hospital still (or worse), considering how bad of a concussion I got WITH the helmet.

It's not just our choice. My fall scared my boyfriend, my parents, my sister, my friends.

candico
Oct. 3, 2010, 02:25 PM
Just curious, how do you all feel about vaulters not wearing helmets? I just think it is an interesting debate because you can't say they don't fall, but are there statistics that there are more or less injuries?? Do kids learning to vault wear helmets? Not meaning to be on one side or another - but I just thought how it would be a tricky new rule to tackle... enforcing helmets for vaulters.

Foxtrot's
Oct. 3, 2010, 04:04 PM
Apparently "they've done studies" and the helmets do not fit with the fine tolerances required, being bulky. I was uncomfortable with it when my daughter did vaulting, too.

While big name riders are not setting the example, the rest of the world will not either. I remember when Ian Millar missed going to Sweden for a big competition because of a concussion. I think it changed his habits...hope so.

And some of the 'excuses' make the non-helmet riders sound like idiots. Barn owners should be insisting on all riders being helmeted.

TheHorseProblem
Oct. 3, 2010, 05:20 PM
Heard at the barn this weekend:

"Hey, where's your helmet?"

"It's okay. If something happens, I'll just jump off."

slbose61
Oct. 3, 2010, 05:34 PM
I am a huge proponent of helmets, especially after a serious fall that cracked my helmet and resulted in major injuries.

Yesterday, I'm at the tack shop and a guy is there with his horse having it fitted for an English saddle. It's obvious his horse does not like this saddle and I mentioned this to him. His response is "Oh, that's ok, he's like that with every saddle". So he decides to go for a test ride in the field next to the shop. I ask him if he is going to wear a helmet, and he laughs and says no. He gets on and the horse immediatley starts kicking out. Then the horse throws its head down, the guy flips over its shoulder and lands heavily on the ground. He insists he is ok, but is limping pretty badly. I mentioned his wearing a helmet in the future and he responds saying he has never ridden in an English saddle before, that it will just take some time to get use to it, and he doesn't need a helmet. This guy was clearly in his 60's and I will be surprised if he makes it to his 70's with that mindset.

slbose61
Oct. 3, 2010, 05:40 PM
And some of the 'excuses' make the non-helmet riders sound like idiots. Barn owners should be insisting on all riders being helmeted.

Our barn does and will kick you out if you don't. I won't even let someone just "sit" on my horse without a helmet.

happyhaffiehaley
Oct. 5, 2010, 10:34 PM
In regards to the vaulting concerns, there is actually quite a bit of research in this area. Take a look at these pages:

http://www.americanvaulting.org/safety/threepoints.shtml

http://asci.uvm.edu/equine/law/amea/may96nws.htm

http://falconwoodvaulters.com/safety.aspx

Essentially, vaulting with helmets is unsafe, as helmets can (and will) get caught on the surcingle/side reins, in addition to changing the vaulter's balance. Vaulting is statistically the safest equestrian sport in regards to head injuries. This is because vaulting is done in a controlled environment, on a well-trained horse (certainly not all horses can be vaulting horses), with vaulters who are specifically trained to come off the horse safely and who train to be very aware and in control of their bodies. Vaulters practice new moves in a progressive fashion, beginning on the stationary barrel and working their way up the gaits.

I am a huge helmet advocate in every circumstance except vaulting. Please feel free to contact me with more vaulting questions/concerns, and I will try to help!

But I have another point on the helmet issue. Even ignoring all the other arguments (lack of helmet use affects more people than just riders, increased insurance rates, increased toll on health care system), I feel like we are getting left behind of many other sports. After all, dressage/horseback riding is a sport, right? Haven't most other sports mandated proper use of safety equipment, especially at competitions? Take a look at skateboarders, freestyle skiers, bmxers, motocrossers, football players, and any other sport with risk. In those sports, I don't think people think you look dorky for wearing a helmet and other proper safety gear. To the contrary, I think the opinion is that you look professional! And maybe this is a simple way to get riding considered a sport in the eyes of the laymen.

And taking that further, think about top riders. International competitors likely have a countless amount of resources invested in them, from coaching to sponsorship to hours in the saddle. I am in no way objectifying or putting a price tag on these riders; rather, I am saying that they are precious resources, and for good reason! Keeping that in mind, wouldn't you think that the powers that be would want to keep these riders safe by mandating the use of proper safety equipment? Requiring riders to wear helmets is a reasonable request that makes emotional, physical, and financial sense, and it's a way for the "investments" that are top riders to be protected. The Steffens and Debbies aren't lurking around every corner, and while I am thrilled to see riders (like Steffen) making good helmet decisions, I would imagine that our governing bodies and top coaches want to do everything they can to help top competitors succeed, and this is an easy way to do that.

-Haley

Foxtrot's
Oct. 7, 2010, 12:03 AM
That is exactly what was explained to us when we did vaulting. A good post and one that I totally agree with.

Coppers mom
Oct. 7, 2010, 12:32 AM
Haley: I agree. The football guy that does the Head and Shoulders commercial actually has his hair insured. It'd be wise for pros to take a little from that mindset.

Continuing from that, let's face it, what are these pros going to do if they can't ride? It's not like they have a serious fall back plan anymore after 10 or more years in the horse business. Riding in the Olympics is cool, but no one's going to hire a drooling lump in a wheel chair just because they were an Olympian before a severe brain injury. Then what will the rider do?

We wear seatbelts, we wear boots, we have airbags all because most of the time you won't need them. But most of the times that you do need them, you really, really do. Helmets, really should be no different.

riderboy
Oct. 7, 2010, 07:20 AM
Quote from the article:

“I’m a proponent for helmet use, but it’s totally up to the individual,” King Dye said in an e-mail typed with her left hand.

Even Courtney recognized its a personal decision. Maybe you all should follow in her foot steps.

Also quoted from her website. " I have gotten several e-mails describing accidents that, because of my spill, they were saved by wearing a helmet." I prefer to follow in those footsteps. But hey, knock yourself out. (no pun intended)

Stormgsd
Oct. 7, 2010, 07:45 PM
I think that helmets are very important and I truly wonder why saddle seat riders don't require helmets. I had a question about riding in Ugg boots and most people wore quick to point out that they were not safe, but, which is a good point. I guess though the head is even more important than the feet!!!!:yes::yes:

Middlebrook
Oct. 8, 2010, 12:22 PM
He dedicated his ride and metal to CKD and made a "victory" ride donning an approved riding helmet at the WEG.
Me? I always were an approved schooling helmet and my velvet show helmet while riding.
Yep, I look like a dork and in FLA, we SWEAT to death and my thin hair plasters to my head after my rides.
I still wear it because I need my brains to make a living:winkgrin:

BetterOffRed
Oct. 8, 2010, 01:46 PM
to recover from a TBI. Call me cheap, but looking at the monetary side of things makes it much easier for me to spend money on a $135 cool, low profile helmet when I consider the cost to recover from a TBI! Thus reducing the risk to my livelihood, my pocketbook. I don't know about y'all but I am single and completely responsible for my own financial well being and that of my animals.

Since the CKD accident, I've worn my helmet every ride. If someone with her seat, her experience can be hurt, I sure as hell could too.

A local rider in our community was in a horse related accident similar to CKDs. She had to stay in a medically induced coma for around a month in order to aid her recovery. She was in ICU for that time. Someone on this board could proably provide a better estimate, but my friend who is the head of ER at the hospital where this rider was hospitalized, estimates that the cost of ICU for 1 month could easily reach over $1M. And that isn't even counting the recovery in a specialized rehab. Who knows what medical insurance covers.

I am not saying that TBI's will be completely eliminated from helmet usage, but it greatly reduces the risks. If I were injured, and still had the mental capacity, I think I would be so traumatized by the cost of recovery!

Peace
Oct. 8, 2010, 01:53 PM
Why do we worry so much about what other people are doing??? If it's not hurting the horse it is NOT our business. I still don't understand the point of wearing one in the schooling ring then switching to a top hat for the show ring. Are horses incapable of falling in the ring or bucking?

esdressage
Oct. 8, 2010, 02:07 PM
I am sitting here on day 5 of a concussion from a fluke accident fall. The first thing my mother said to my sister on the phone was "I bet she wasn't wearing a helmet, right?" because having grown up in a rural area where helmets weren't even heard of, I've been the slowest in our family to adopt them. My sister didn't start riding until college, so helmets are just routine for her. Me, though ... eh, it's taken longer.

But I'm currently riding a 4 yr old and a 5 yr old, both pretty green - which means I wear a helmet on every ride. I was riding the 5 yr old when I fell, practicing Intro A, going from free walk to medium walk. Yeah. Intro ... and at the walk. She only has about 60 rides, and somehow between taking up the reins, asking her to bend into the corner, and preparing for the trot transition at C we cut it a little too close to the mounting block. Wouldn't have been a big deal but a whip was sticking out about a foot. The whip tanged in her back legs, she spooked and stepped up onto the mounting block with her right hind and pushed off and to the left. She kept her balance, but I was launched over her right shoulder. I twisted and actually saw her hip come up as she was stepping off :)

I hit the ground hard ... and my helmet cracked down the middle and caved in. (Not sure if I actually hit the wooden jump poles that were right there or not, I just know I hit my head.

If I had stuck to my normal "personal choice" of no helmet ... instead of being safe and smart ... well, I'd probably be in the hospital still (or worse), considering how bad of a concussion I got WITH the helmet.

It's not just our choice. My fall scared my boyfriend, my parents, my sister, my friends.

I'm so glad you're OK!!! What an incredible turn of events… at the walk.

BetterOffRed
Oct. 8, 2010, 02:08 PM
It's a free country, we are all free to go helmetless if we want.

But, should something ever happen to you helmetless riders and we have to mop up your drool or change your diaper...don't be surprised when we say, "I told you so"....just sayin! ;)

rainechyldes
Oct. 8, 2010, 02:18 PM
I wear a helmet, my children wear a helmet. What other people wear .. I don't give a rats ass- that's the way I look at it.

Foxtrot's
Oct. 8, 2010, 04:08 PM
Fine, it is a free country - sort of - but it is the increase in medical bills caused by those who will not wear helmets that puts up medical bills that we all have to share in paying....US or Canada.

Do you really think you would get insurance if your put a note on your medical applicatons that said: "I ride horses but chose not to ride with a helmet."

We have laws requiring seat belts in cars and helmets for motorcycles, and a lot of ski schools will not let you take part unless wearing a helmet after the death of Natasha Richardson.

meupatdoes
Oct. 8, 2010, 04:38 PM
I am a staunch helmet wearer and I will not let anyone on my horses with no helmet and I will not stand in the ring and teach anyone who is not wearing a helmet.

However, I find the "insurance rates go up for everyone" argument to forget a key point.

Sure, insurance rates go up for everyone when equestrian sports participants fall off their horses without helmet protection.

But insurance rates are already going up for everyone because an elitely privileged segment of the population has decided they want to ride powerful, often explosive animals around in the first place, regardless of whether they are wearing helmets or not.

You can get seriously hurt in a riding accident that in no way invovles your head and still drum up plenty of insurance bills for everyone else, so before anyone jumps on the insurance argument too hard think about that for a second and put the pointer finger down.

We are ALL raising insurance rates for people who will never be privileged enough to participate in the sport, simply because of what we choose to do for a hobby.

riderboy
Oct. 8, 2010, 06:46 PM
I am a staunch helmet wearer and I will not let anyone on my horses with no helmet and I will not stand in the ring and teach anyone who is not wearing a helmet.

However, I find the "insurance rates go up for everyone" argument to forget a key point.

Sure, insurance rates go up for everyone when equestrian sports participants fall off their horses without helmet protection.

But insurance rates are already going up for everyone because an elitely privileged segment of the population has decided they want to ride powerful, often explosive animals around in the first place, regardless of whether they are wearing helmets or not.

You can get seriously hurt in a riding accident that in no way invovles your head and still drum up plenty of insurance bills for everyone else, so before anyone jumps on the insurance argument too hard think about that for a second and put the pointer finger down.

We are ALL raising insurance rates for people who will never be privileged enough to participate in the sport, simply because of what we choose to do for a hobby.
First of all, Kudos to you for wearing your helmet and setting
a great example for others. And you have some very valid points regarding the fact that you can certainly get seriously hurt riding with or without a helmet. Been there, done that. Guilty. However, it seems like the "pro-choice" argument is fueled by two things. 1) Only the rider is affected by the consequences of choosing to go helmetless, so just leave me alone. And 2) That choice is based on an "understanding" and acceptance of the risk.
In my view, those arguments do not accurately reflect reality. Emotionally and financially TBIs affect a great number of people who have no choice in the matter. Higher costs of health and liability insurance, or higher taxes to pay the medicaid/medicare costs for not only acute care, but also lifelong disability and nursing home or visiting nurse care. These are not run-of-the-mill injuries, they can be catastrophic and astronomically expensive, running through a persons lifetime. And that doesn't even begin to factor lost income from work, lost tax revenue from that, etc. That, of course, does not include the devastation both emotionally and financially on family members. I can handle the " Your wife broke her leg, she'll need surgery but she'll be OK." I'm sure how I would handle "Your wife is in a coma, we don't know what the damage is at this point. We'll just have to wait and see." There are injuries and then there are injuries. Burns, spinal cord trauma and TBIs are in a league of their own.
As far as number 2) Really? After doing a rotation in a burn unit at a county hospital as a medical student I can assure you my "understanding" of burn injuries is such that anything that might remotely put me in danger of one is not even considered. I've also seen the consequences of other severe injuries as have other medical professionals I know. We all wear helmets, always. There's no way to understand that sort of hell unless you've lived it. And if THAT doesn't convince you of the importance of wearing a helmet, well, God help you.

Foxtrot's
Oct. 8, 2010, 09:05 PM
Little point preaching to the choir, I suppose.

We can all do a lot to mitigate the most severe consequences of our sport.
Thousands ride their whole lives long and never get badly hurt...we should enjoy the fact that riders will not necessarily get a catastrophic injury.

I worked for a top personal injury lawyer and his filing cabinet gave me a perspective on these types of injuries. He had shelves of client files - all of them paraplegic or quadraplegic. I can remember two or three that were genuine accidents. All the others were young people diving into the shallow ends of swimming pools while partying, youths who drove ATV's over the edge of gravel pits, driving while under the influence, etc. A grain of sense and a lot of these sad statistics could have been avoided.

riderboy
Oct. 8, 2010, 09:51 PM
Yep, life is inherently dangerous. It's all a gamble, but the good gamblers do everything they can to tilt the odds in their favor.

spirithorse
Oct. 8, 2010, 09:56 PM
I must interject here that even with a helmet I suffered a concussion.
I a sooooo glad I had it on.
Helmets should be mandatory in all equine sporting events....PERIOD

Peace
Oct. 9, 2010, 07:51 AM
I must interject here that even with a helmet I suffered a concussion.
I a sooooo glad I had it on.
Helmets should be mandatory in all equine sporting events....PERIOD

Learning how to ride well might help that.

Madeline
Oct. 9, 2010, 08:28 AM
Learning how to ride well might help that.

Try telling Courtney King Dye that.

Increasing helmet use by telling people they are stupid won't help. If they were smart, they would wear helmets.

The only reasonable control is for sanctioning bodies (USEF) and hosting venues to mandate helmet use. "If you want to play in our playground, you must wear an approved helmet." That maintains the ever-touted-as-precious element of choice.

Next on the agenda is for people to wear correctly fitted helmets correctly.

CFFarm
Oct. 9, 2010, 08:31 AM
Learning how to ride well might help that.

Horses are not machines. Riding ability usually doesn't always come into play with head injuries.

Thinking must change. Top hats should go away (Oh, the horror) and helmets should become the norm. When I was a kid no one used pads under saddles, now who would tack up without one? It should become second nature.

Hey, even the bronc riders are starting to wear helmets and pads. 20 years ago that would have been sacrilegious!

vineyridge
Oct. 9, 2010, 08:34 AM
As I've said before, misguided pride has a lot to do with helmetless riding. My former farrier has a wife who suffered a serious TBI two years ago and is still not right. I asked him if he was riding with a helmet now, and he said that "he was too good a rider" to need one.

Right!

I've even gotten to the point that I use a hard hat when I'm mowing on my tractor because of tree limbs that can crack hard against the head.

Education is the answer; if someone can't even learn from experience, the education needs to start from the very beginning--as a child, with the very first exposure to horses. Helmets as a habit. Just like seatbelts in automobiles.

SillyHorse
Oct. 9, 2010, 08:54 AM
Learning how to ride well might help that.


Try telling Courtney King Dye that.
Yeah peace, maybe you can offer to give Courtney some lessons when she's back to riding -- IF she's ever back to riding. I'm sure she'd be grateful. Be sure to tell her that if she had learned to ride better, it might have helped.

SillyHorse
Oct. 9, 2010, 09:15 AM
My former farrier has a wife who suffered a serious TBI two years ago and is still not right. I asked him if he was riding with a helmet now, and he said that "he was too good a rider" to need one.

There really is no cure for stupid. :no:

Peace
Oct. 9, 2010, 11:59 AM
Yeah peace, maybe you can offer to give Courtney some lessons when she's back to riding -- IF she's ever back to riding. I'm sure she'd be grateful. Be sure to tell her that if she had learned to ride better, it might have helped.

Well since I quoted someone it should have been obvious I wasn't speaking about Courtney:sigh:

SillyHorse
Oct. 9, 2010, 12:27 PM
Sorry, that makes absolutely no sense. If learning how to ride well prevented head injuries, then... oh, never mind. You won't understand that, either.

Peace
Oct. 9, 2010, 12:35 PM
Sorry, that makes absolutely no sense. If learning how to ride well prevented head injuries, then... oh, never mind. You won't understand that, either.

I'm getting it just fine I think you are struggling with it..It was directed to an individual...:eek:

SillyHorse
Oct. 9, 2010, 05:49 PM
Yep, I was right. :lol:

ridgeback
Oct. 9, 2010, 06:53 PM
No worries Peace some have trouble grasping things. I understand what you were saying.

SillyHorse
Oct. 9, 2010, 09:24 PM
My grasp of the English language is just fine, probably better than most. When someone writes, whether to "an individual" or otherwise, that learning to ride better would help eliminate a head injury from a fall, it's a clear indication that the writer does not understand that riding ability has little or no relation to falls.

But since you understand what was said, why don't you explain it? Please explain why what peace said pertains only to one individual, and to no one else? Please, please, help me grasp it!

englslady
Feb. 2, 2011, 08:46 PM
You can read the full details of Debbie McDonalds accident at: http://www.riders4helmets.com/?p=2116