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EquitationRider
Sep. 27, 2010, 08:55 PM
What are your tecniques to super good bubble baths? I am not a good bath giver and when I think i do a good job my horse is still filthy! What are the tricks to making your horse shine?

SquareOxer
Sep. 27, 2010, 09:05 PM
I'm not a huge bubble bath fan, I'm more of a currying and plain water person, but when I bathe, I usually do this:

Use vetrolin bath shampoo (diluted in a bucket). Other soaps are cool too, I just like this one for my dark bay, i think it has a little extra shine power. Apply with sponge and suds it all around, then take one of those jelly scrubbers and suds some more (my girl loves the scratching :D). Let it sit for a few minutes, ie. do 1 side and don't rinse before you do the other. I use a drop of baby shampoo for the face.

Voila, clean beastie :)

nickers@dawn
Sep. 27, 2010, 09:12 PM
First of all it helps to really keep your horse clean with good grooming, that's where your hair quality and shine come from. But a good bath can really make them sparkle.

I would start with warm water and good water pressure. If you can't get down to the skin you won't lift the dirt out. Really wet the coat down first. Then use your favorite shampoo, I'm not big on any brand, though the whitening ones do help for socks.
Use one of those soft currys and really scrub! Just remember not to go too nuts on the legs because you can irritate them. Make sure the mane and tail are cleaned down to the roots.

Don't forget the head! Use a ladder if you have to, nothing like a clean horse that stops at the head. :no:

Then rinse, with pressure! now rinse some more, most of the problems come from not getting out the soap/dirt thru improper rinsing. If you are short, back on the step stool to rinse the back and mane well.

Finally put show sheen in the tail and towel off the legs and head well. Don't forget to wipe out ears and lightly oil them.

So now your horse looks like a million bucks. :yes:

onthehill
Sep. 27, 2010, 09:25 PM
When bubble-bathing, this is my routine:

Wet down horse.

Then, I use a coconut-oil based natural dish washing liquid (no harsh chemicals). Squirt some on a sponge and scrub in circles, starting just below the ear, and go all the way to butt (don't forget tummy chest/under chest).

Next, I do the mane & tail with Head & Shoulders. I squirt some on the main and scrub down to the skin with finger nails; don't forget the bridal path up to and between ears. For the tail, I get 1/2 bucket warm water and make suds with Head & Shoulders. Bring bucket up behind tail so that tail and tail bone get bathed (you'll have to scrub with a sponge/fingers to get down to the bone near the top)

Do the legs next. I use a sponge on the upper, and a bristle brush on the lowers in a downward stroking motion only. If legs are pretty clean, I'll stick with the natural dish soap. If not, I'll use the H&S to cut crud.

Last is the face. I'll use unscented natural baby shampoo for the forelock and all of the face.

Rinse time! Mainly, I'll hose off. Then, I do a bucket rinse with several "glubs" of vinegar to finish off.

Shouldn't really do bubble baths more than once a week.

shamateur
Sep. 27, 2010, 10:21 PM
My trick is to curry with the shampoo on. And curry while you're rinsing- the best way to get a good clean rinse.

Tobias
Sep. 27, 2010, 10:33 PM
I like to use just some cheap walmart body wash. smells good and works great! I fill a 8qt bucket with water and about 3Tsb to about 1/4 cup (no I don't measure it, just guess) of soap. use that to wash whole body, mane tail, and gently on the face. Scrubbing in circles with the sponge to get them all soapy! I ad a little extra soap and some conditioner to the mane and tail and scrub good with my fingers. I get a stiff brush and scrub the hooves, it gets all that cruddy stuff off at the coronet.

Then rinse away, good water pressure is a plus! currying while rinsing is a good idea, I will try that, sometimes I just scrape (sweat scraper) them while I am rinsing, putting fresh water over where I just scraped, if that makes any sense.


I will be grooming my sisters horse for his Keuring this weekend. I too will be looking at all these tips. We have been currying like crazy for that last few weeks. Her horse loved it!

HGem
Sep. 27, 2010, 10:35 PM
I wet half the horse, scrub that side with a short bristled hard brush, making sure to get lots of suds. Then move to the other side, we it down, scrub it and then start rinsing from the first side first. Special scrubbing usually goes into the tail (especially underneath and the sides of the tail bone), the mane and hocks/knees. Both my horses require a rag/sponge bath for the head, but the works very well too. Shampoo wise I'm a big fan of the cheap Swave Coconut shampoo. It shines up real well and it smells really good. I also always scrub the hooves last because it can make the brush muddy/dirty.

Here are some other tips I've gathered after years of production/showmanship:
-groom daily with showsheen or hair moisturizer (I prefer the later), it helps repel dirt and adds great shine to the coat and detangles mane/tail.
-for black/bay horses bath frequently with Quick Color. It helps deepen the coat color, especially if they start to bleach out from the sun.
-Quick Silver is the anwser to white horses. You have to make sure you lather it into a white foam (must use enough water), let it sit for awhile and then rinse.
-to keep a tail full, long and clean (especially white ones) keep it in a tail bag!!

*i have a big black and white paint (mostly white) mare that LOVES to be dirty. if you would like a detailed description on how to make a white horse white i can give you a lot more tips....i showed her in showmanship and believe me, she was SPOTLESS :)

SolarFlare
Sep. 27, 2010, 10:38 PM
I add a glug of white vinegar to a small bucket of water, then use it as a final rinse (after rinsing off all suds first). The vinegar cuts through any soap residue and leaves a nice shine. The horse will not smell like vinegar after it dries. :D

Hunter Mom
Sep. 27, 2010, 10:46 PM
I like one of the net scrubbies that I have for myself. They do a great job of getting all the way down without being harsh.

JumperLove555
Sep. 27, 2010, 11:27 PM
I only bathe the day before leaving for a show. My guys doesn't have socks, so any quality shampoo will do. My favorite tool is a brush with a sponge in the center. I use it like a curry and it gets up ALL the dirt!!

Dazednconfused
Sep. 27, 2010, 11:33 PM
What are your tecniques to super good bubble baths? I am not a good bath giver and when I think i do a good job my horse is still filthy! What are the tricks to making your horse shine?

I like to curry the soap in, so it gets down to their skin. And I bathe relatively often - once a week or so ideally. Lots of currying on non-bath days. I don't agree with anyone that says soap dries out the hair or is bad for them. Most arab farms rinse every day, and full soap & conditioner baths at least a couple times a week, and the horses have fantastic coats. I feel like if you're not doing baths often enough they just keep building up more dirt and grossness. In addition the stains set in, and are more difficult to get out, even with skilled grooming.

Neely
Sep. 28, 2010, 07:22 PM
First of all it helps to really keep your horse clean with good grooming, that's where your hair quality and shine come from. But a good bath can really make them sparkle.

I would start with warm water and good water pressure. If you can't get down to the skin you won't lift the dirt out. Really wet the coat down first. Then use your favorite shampoo, I'm not big on any brand, though the whitening ones do help for socks.
Use one of those soft currys and really scrub! Just remember not to go too nuts on the legs because you can irritate them. Make sure the mane and tail are cleaned down to the roots.

Don't forget the head! Use a ladder if you have to, nothing like a clean horse that stops at the head. :no:

Then rinse, with pressure! now rinse some more, most of the problems come from not getting out the soap/dirt thru improper rinsing. If you are short, back on the step stool to rinse the back and mane well.

Finally put show sheen in the tail and towel off the legs and head well. Don't forget to wipe out ears and lightly oil them.

So now your horse looks like a million bucks. :yes:

This. But I am a big fan of Orvis. I have yet to see anything else create such a shine. Also...like the others have said-save the bubble baths for when they are really really dirty, or before showing. Grooming and water are best for the inbetween-then when you do give a bath, they are even shinier!

SmileItLooksGoodOnYou
Sep. 28, 2010, 08:01 PM
My horse has had exactly two full bubble baths in the 16 months I've had him, and I only gave him one of them.

My old guy had maybe 10 bubble baths in all 5 years.

Granted, they're both bay.

I've bathed a grey that I showed for a girl more 12 times.... so more than both my own horses combined.



As far as good baths... I use a big sea sponge and whatever shampoo I have laying around, maybe 1/3 of a cup in a little bucket then all the way full of water. Wash circles with the sponge, curry, rinse, curry, rinse, scrape, rinse, scrape again.

I'm also a fan of white vinegar, but I do diluted half and half on a clean rag and rub the horse all over with it. For white socks I dry with a towel and spray some rubbing alcohol on to get them dry quick before they get dirty.

amastrike
Sep. 28, 2010, 09:39 PM
1. Soak horse.
2. Add a dollop of shampoo (I use Vetrolin bath) to a small bucket of water. Sponge over horse, rubbing in lightly.
3. Rinse.
4. Refill your small bucket and add a dollop or two of shampoo. Sponge generously over horse.
5. Using a soft curry (like a jelly scrubber), scrub the horse down. I like to keep a soapy sponge in the other hand and add soapy water as needed.
6. Top the bucket off with water, dunk the tail, and scrub.
7. Rinse very very thoroughly. I do one side, then the other, back to the first side again, and the other side again.

spmoonie
Sep. 28, 2010, 09:44 PM
I like to add about a couple drops of baby oil to the shampoo/water. Im also a big fan of the vinegar rinse afterwards. My favorite shampoos are Quiksilver and Healing tree tea tree oil shampoo. Warm water works best.

Tuesday's Child
Sep. 28, 2010, 10:00 PM
How do you all wash your horses' tails so easily? Is my mare just weird? She HATES when I'm trying to do her tail and I use a bucket. The skirt is fine, but as soon as the water hits her dock, watch out! She will tuck her bum, scoot around, threaten to kick... any suggestions? Love all the other tips mentioned so far!

fourmares
Sep. 30, 2010, 12:27 AM
I use a pair of scrubby gloves that I bought in the bath section at the dollar store. Wet the horse well, apply a line of shampoo down the neck, back and butt. Use the gloves to make suds, scrub well. Add shampoo to the underside and legs by putting a dallup on the gloves and rubbing in well. Use the fingers on the gloves to get in around the tendons on the legs. Spray horse lightly with water. Rub all over again making more suds. Rinse horse well. Remove gloves. Wash tail.

onthehill
Sep. 30, 2010, 10:17 AM
How do you all wash your horses' tails so easily? Is my mare just weird? She HATES when I'm trying to do her tail and I use a bucket. The skirt is fine, but as soon as the water hits her dock, watch out! She will tuck her bum, scoot around, threaten to kick... any suggestions? Love all the other tips mentioned so far!

We have a mare that tucks her bum and scoots too. For her, with the bucket? I go slow and use warm water. I also get the bucket just below the tail bone. When it is there, I use a sponge and my hand (you could use one of those mitt scubbers too) and gently wash her tailbone. For rinsing, I either just do warm bucket rinse soaks, or, with the hose I put it on a slow setting. She wound up being fine with that ...


Forgot to mention .... prior to bathing ... I curry, curry, curry; vacuum, then do my bath routine.

JumpWithPanache
Sep. 30, 2010, 10:26 AM
I bubble bathe my horse as little as possible, but rinse often and well and groom deeply at least once a week. Before a bubble bath I do a deep grooming to get up as much dirt and loose hair as I can as well as to spread the oils along the coat. Then horse gets thoroughly wetted down with pressure to help lift remaining dirt. I half fill a small bucket with water and a squirt of shampoo, right now I've been using the Pyranha shampoo with really good results. To suds up the horse I use a regular rubber currey and squirt a little shampoo into the center section. As needed I rinse the curry in the little bucket and rewet the curry. Once both sides of the horse have been curried I rinse off the horse with pressure to rinse away dirt and suds. Then I go back over with the curry to lift up any remaining dirt and rinse again. Tail and mane get washed, with another thorough rinse afterwards. I wash the face with an auto wash mitt (http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_2N1-Chenille-Mitt-Mirage_6140038-P_N3307_T%7CGRP2074____)which holds water and tearless baby shampoo really well without dripping all over the place. To rinse the face I use the same mitt but after it's been rinsed clean, then continue to rinse the mitt often. Sometimes I will apply a coat conditioner, but not terribly often.

skrgirl
Sep. 30, 2010, 10:54 AM
I add a glug of white vinegar to a small bucket of water, then use it as a final rinse (after rinsing off all suds first). The vinegar cuts through any soap residue and leaves a nice shine. The horse will not smell like vinegar after it dries. :D

Apple cider vinegar gives the same results and works as a mild insect repellent as well.

birdsong
Sep. 30, 2010, 11:02 AM
I wet the horse down all over and then start with a thick rubber curry and hose. Sometimes shampoo sometimes not. The curry gets to the skin and loosens old hair.

blackcat95
Sep. 30, 2010, 12:04 PM
I curry first, then hose down horse. A big dollop of Dial soap (the orange kind) on one of those net scrubby mitt things, scrub horse all over (both sides), rinse. Do mane and tail. Rinse. Re-wet legs, scrub legs with Quicksilver and rubber scrubby mitt if there are bad stains. Rinse, and then scrape, towel, and maybe rinse again if there is still soap. My guy HATES water on his face, so the best I can do is a slightly damp towel or sponge. No soap, he'd hate it.

MyGiantPony
Sep. 30, 2010, 12:11 PM
I do the Orivis bubbles and rubber curry...

but can someone please teach me how to not get a rush of water down my arm when I'm rinsing the head and neck?

I look like a drowned rat after bathtime.

KateKat
Sep. 30, 2010, 12:28 PM
I do the Orivis bubbles and rubber curry...

but can someone please teach me how to not get a rush of water down my arm when I'm rinsing the head and neck?

I look like a drowned rat after bathtime.


I figure I usually give baths after riding so I'm all hot and stinky too, so me getting a bath along with the horse isn't necessarily a bad thing ;)

Xanthoria
Sep. 30, 2010, 09:19 PM
but can someone please teach me how to not get a rush of water down my arm when I'm rinsing the head and neck?

I look like a drowned rat after bathtime.

http://www.cashelcompany.com/ProductDetails.aspx?C=4&SC=37&ProductID=8706

danceronice
Oct. 1, 2010, 11:31 AM
I start with a groomed horse (I usually only give him a full-on soapy bath after riding.) So all the big clumps and loose hair are off. Then I hose him down on one side and use the soap (I use Mane n' Tail....bottle for him, bottle for me, bottle for him....) and let it sit while I hose/soap the other side, then I hose the first side while the second sits. I've found it's best to dry-groom first and get the heaviest stuff off rather than try and scrub it out and have it turn to mud.

MyGiantPony
Oct. 1, 2010, 12:30 PM
http://www.cashelcompany.com/ProductDetails.aspx?C=4&SC=37&ProductID=8706

That's awesome - why can't I invent stuff like that?

But more importantly - why are my friends perfectly capable of staying dry when bathing their horses, and I end up soaked? :lol:

RugBug
Oct. 1, 2010, 03:28 PM
That's awesome - why can't I invent stuff like that?

But more importantly - why are my friends perfectly capable of staying dry when bathing their horses, and I end up soaked? :lol:

I end up just as wet as the horse, too. :winkgrin:

My bathing technique: Use my regular curry comb, scrub one half to the knees, hocks, ears. Rinse with a sweat scraper (scrape the water/soap off as you go...really gets all the soap out . Wash the other side. Rinse with sweat scraper. Rinse first side again because some soap will have migrated down that side.

Then do tail. Tie tail up

Then do legs from the knees down (body is now drying off...so by the time your done with the legs...the body is all or partly dry).

Then face with a sponge.

You're done.

I like to use my curry comb because not only does it bring the grime up/get down to the skin, but it also washes my curry comb. Bonus!

Sansena
Oct. 1, 2010, 11:09 PM
Haven't read the thread, so forgive me if this is redundant.

Curry, vacuum, then curry well. Be sure you've removed as much loose hair as possible. I like Slick n' Easy grooming bricks.

Warm water in large, 5 gal or more bucket. Add a 4 second squirt of shampoo of your choice. Have a large sponge ready, and a rubber - nubby mitt on hand, and a medium stiff plastic bristle brush. Hose horse thoroughly, then wet mane and tail thoroughly. I use a trigger type hose nozzle so I can adjust stream.. A wide fan to to wet down large areas.. strong stream to 'power wash' out soap & dirt from legs.

After mane is soaked, grab the sponge from deep in the bucket, sopping wet. Add a squirt of soap to the sponge and run it up and down the mane, so as to wet & spread the soap. Lather well, rinse mane, repeat.

Dunk sponge again, and with the sponge above your mitt (using 2 hands now) squeeze soapy water onto horse in circular motion, while scrubbing with mitt against growth of hair in other. Work section by section, rinsing & repeating if your horse is especially 'gummy'. Just do the body for now, let the suds sit while you do the tail & legs.

FYI: I hasten rinsing by using another 2 hand technique. Hose 'fanned' in one hand, with crescent shaped sweat scraper in the other. Crossing back and forth with each hand going in opposite directions, your spray/ squeegee working top to bottom until water runs clean.

Wet hair & legs again. Dunk whole tail in bucket, lather tail bone w/ more shampoo on the sponge & rinse. Repeat until tail bone is clean. Quick rinse to be sure your tail is clean.

Legs are done with just a squirt of soap on the mitt, with the soaked sponge above, as you did the body. Below the pasterns you'll need more soap, and probably to lather twice ore more.

Rinse thoroughly as outlined above.. 'power wash' the legs by crossing horizontally repeatedly in downward steps. I like this part: you get to see the dirt run out of the hair, especially on white legs.

If you choose to do the face, only you know how to proceed. I do the face just before I rinse the whole body. My horse tolerates a spray, so a tell him 'head down', lay back his ear as I rinse one side of his face at a time, then use the rubber mitt with a tiny bit of soap. I'd prefer to use Betadine if I know the horse is going to dance.. it's less caustic on the eyes. My horse is great, so I can avoid getting soap in his eyes. Rinse as you see fit.. just be sure you rinse VERY well.

Sorry so long.. just wanted to detail.
I'm an ex pro-groom, and have been doing this longer than I can remember. IT's the quickest, most efficient way to bathe.

iloverain
Oct. 1, 2010, 11:32 PM
groom, expensive shampoo, expensive conditioner, and apple cider vinegar to top it off.
for me? cheap shampoo, cheap conditioner, rinse off.
my mare is a spoiled brat!