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Jack16
Sep. 27, 2010, 12:33 PM
So I am starting to weigh my options for my next horse purchase. I have thought about in-utero, weanlings, yearlings, etc. I am trying to figure out what you think a quality hunter at these young ages would cost and most importantly where you find them! Trainers don't go out looking for horses this age so that isn't really an option. If you were going out to find a prospect that has A show potential in the hunters, what do you expect to pay for them at these stages? Obviously by the time they are 2 or 3 you have an idea of what their jump looks like and how they move much more than these young ages so their prices go very high. Secondly, where do you find these? It seems like there isn't a lot for sale at this age. Thoughts? Experience?

RyuEquestrian
Sep. 27, 2010, 01:22 PM
Currently we have a Crown Affair x Alla 'Czar in-utero priced at $8,000 (we usually price our in-uteros between $7,000-$9,000 depending on the stallion and mare).

The standard pricing for in-uteros is at a 30% discount to the price of the foal once it is on the ground. This should also give you an idea of what the foal will be priced at once it hits the ground.

Most of our clients have come to us because they have done their research and have a particular stallion (may it be because they have performed well in the ring or because their offspring have performed well, or a combination.) that they have in mind and they would like to purchase an offspring by that stallion.

I would also stress to you that the stallion isn't the only part of that equation, look at the mare just as carefully. What has the mare produced? If the mare hasn't had any foals, did it have a career in sport? Has this cross been done before?

These are things that can give you an idea of what the cross will give you.

Feel free to PM me and I'd be happy to put give you my suggestions for Hunter breeders.

Lucassb
Sep. 27, 2010, 01:41 PM
Well, if you are really set on buying a baby, perhaps because you want a very specific bloodline or cross... then I think you go to the breeders that have those stallions and mares. McCarverS's program is a great example and she has some really lovely stock!

I personally take a different approach and buy youngsters, very green ones, but old enough to "see what they are," at around 3 years old. I do buy in Europe generally, for a variety of reasons (only one of which is price.) I am not a pro, and have limited time as well as $$$, so it's a major plus to me to have the ability to see a ton of quality animals in close proximity. I can see as many as I have the patience to look at in a single weekend if I go across the pond... that has not been my experience in the US (although I know US breeders are working on that.)

When I compare the cost of buying an in-utero baby for the range that McCarver states above with the cost of buying one that is already perhaps (very) green broke for $20-30K... I figure the money works out about the same by the time you get them ready for that pre-green ring, and this way, I feel that I minimize my risks. There are some people that can look at a foal cavorting around a paddock and see it's future. I am not one of them. However, I can look at how one trots down to that first cross rail and have a good idea of what I've got.

The other reason I buy 3 year olds is that so much can happen in a youngster's life before they get to the point where you can get them going under saddle (and afterwards, of course!) I'd rather have one that I can sit on and test drive a bit, even if they are super green, on day one. I let someone else worry about how to get them to that point, sound, unblemished and unscathed. I also happen to like the way my European connections start their youngsters. I call them blue collar animals. They haven't been overly coddled, and they have all had the idea of working for a living ingrained in them early. Those European breeders aren't terribly sentimental about these horses - they are livestock and are treated well but not spoiled.

Anyway... my two cents. Good luck whichever avenue you take!

CBoylen
Sep. 27, 2010, 07:09 PM
Right now I'm seeing a number of 2-3 year olds around 10-20k. I don't think you'd be saving much in the long run to buy younger, and I've yet to determine how it's possible to pick out a top hunter before it's under tack. Even at 3 you're taking a risk.

Roxy SM
Sep. 27, 2010, 07:21 PM
I also happen to like the way my European connections start their youngsters. I call them blue collar animals. They haven't been overly coddled, and they have all had the idea of working for a living ingrained in them early. Those European breeders aren't terribly sentimental about these horses - they are livestock and are treated well but not spoiled.

Anyway... my two cents. Good luck whichever avenue you take!

This is such a good point! Best to buy from breeders/sellers who don't spoil their horses and let them get away with everything because they are babies or because they think they are so amazing or super-talented. Usually when they think their horse is the most talented (like how people think their children are the best) they price them too high.

RyuEquestrian
Sep. 27, 2010, 07:29 PM
Just putting this out there. We currently have 2 mares in Europe that we are in the process of exporting at $12,000 a piece including quarantine. I know that importing weanlings is cheaper because you can fill a pallet, but it is still no drop in the bucket.

If anyone knows of any cheaper rates for importing, please PM me, we'd love to get these guys into the country as soon as possible.

lauriep
Sep. 27, 2010, 07:39 PM
Sent you a PM in answer to yours.

Summit Springs Farm
Sep. 27, 2010, 07:49 PM
Right now I'm seeing a number of 2-3 year olds around 10-20k. I don't think you'd be saving much in the long run to buy younger, and I've yet to determine how it's possible to pick out a top hunter before it's under tack. Even at 3 you're taking a risk.

What are you up to these days, showing, working young ones at home?
I saw poppy aka Rose Hill at Camden and she looked great with Jen. so I figure you must have something going on, since she's gone?

CBoylen
Sep. 27, 2010, 07:58 PM
I'm looking for the next one while waiting for some minor issues to resolve themselves in my personal horses. Haven't found quite the right one yet though, and I'm not buying just to buy one.
And thank you, everyone is very excited about Rose Hill. I hope to make it up to Harrisburg to see her if I can get my plans together. :)

Summit Springs Farm
Sep. 27, 2010, 08:24 PM
Are you looking abroad or here? Just curious.
My pregreen horse Fairfax completed against Rose Hill at Camden.
It was so fun to tell Jen, hey I have her half sister,D'Lovely, Ok we know having the same sire doesn't mean half sister in horses, but still I said it!
I felt like Jen really liked the ride on Rose Hill, very fun to watch.
We broke D'Lovely this past summer so hopefully we'l see her at the shows soon!
Can't wait to see what you end up with, sure to be nice!

CBoylen
Sep. 27, 2010, 08:34 PM
Jen picked her out for herself, so I am certainly glad she likes her! :D

I am looking here. I have no experience shopping abroad; I think it's overly risky unless you have a very good rapport with a good contact, and then you're paying more money to avoid the risk. I'm also not willing to put money towards import costs that could go toward horse quality.

keepthelegend
Sep. 27, 2010, 08:40 PM
The best deal I ever got was going to the UK. I bought a german bred Hanoverian at a UK showjumping auction. The horse was so obviously a hunter it was ridiculous and the flat kneed movement and slow jump was not very sought after by the jumper crowd. Got him for 8k. I feel like in Germany (where he was shipped over from) they would have been more aware of his hunter type and marketed him for a lot of money to Amerians. England is cheaper and less aware of our hunters than the rest of Europe and it's where I buy all my ponies (welsh or welshy type British riding ponies) and horses.