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moonlightride
Sep. 17, 2010, 05:29 PM
When you listed a horse for sale on dreamhorse, etc how do you avoid all the crazy buyers? Such as people saying they have the money for boarding but can't pay for the horse, or offering an outrageous low amount?. Or those folks that expect a horse to jump, etc even though add says the horse is green and lists what the horse can do.
Also are there any websites for dressage horses/hunter-jumper horses that aren't main stream like dreamhorse or equine.com.I want show riders/etc people and not trail riding women in their 50's replying to an ad about a show horse gelding. Where else can I put him up? He is one of those good as gold ones as a babysitter type. Asking very low amount for him.
So how do you get the buyers to respond, the ones who actually ride english and understand horse is worth more than the asking price. I know it's an option to put horse in full time training on consignment but that's not really an option right now and since there a young trainer working with horse, but she has no horse selling experience, and owner doesn't want horse in additional training before selling. Any way to consign with sale percentage without training+board at trainers facility?

The Centaurian
Sep. 17, 2010, 05:53 PM
Any way to consign with sale percentage without training+board at trainers facility?

Sell horse to trainer to "flip"

moonlightride
Sep. 17, 2010, 06:04 PM
How does that work? Trainers haven't called about buying the horse. They usually buy from word of mouth, at least the real trainers. The other type of trainer, so called trainers expect to get free horses handed to them, the average Sally that hangs up a lesson sign.

CosMonster
Sep. 17, 2010, 08:38 PM
As for your original question, basically you don't. :lol: Or anyway, I have yet to find the trick. You make your ad as specific as possible, but online ads always get tire kickers or other time wasters. Personally I have better luck with print ads in regional publications, which at least have the benefit of requiring people to stop into a tack shop or have a subscription. :lol:

And yeah, IME unless your horse is fancy enough and your asking price is low enough that a trainer thinks they can make a nice profit, it will be hard to find someone to buy him to flip him unless they specialize in that. You could ask around and see if anyone does that type of thing, though.

Frizzle
Sep. 17, 2010, 08:59 PM
If the horse is a warmblood, you might want to try www.warmbloods-for-sale.com (http://www.warmbloods-for-sale.com). That will at least narrow your audience a bit.

Elegante E
Sep. 17, 2010, 10:58 PM
You can't. You just have to deal and weed them out.

moonlightride
Sep. 17, 2010, 11:05 PM
Please give me some websites that most people who offer $500 for horses don't frequent or know about. I will keep ad on dreamhorse, but perhaps should post in some spots where show people or dressage people are more likely to look. It might take longer to sell on a less known website or publication, but might be better to find genuine buyers on there. So I am asking what are some other online options and publications, etc to sell a horse?

DandyMatiz
Sep. 17, 2010, 11:25 PM
Is this hard a member of a registry? many registries have a classified section (so if he's hanoverian, oldenburg, arabian, etc.. that is one way).

atr
Sep. 17, 2010, 11:31 PM
Take a long hard look at your ad. You may be pitching the horse wrong if you are getting the wrong kind of buyer.

And there's always the "delete" button.

Oh, and a horse could do worse than end up with a 50-something trail rider, you know.

Merle
Sep. 17, 2010, 11:38 PM
I have sold horses for decent prices through dreamhorse and equine.com and have had, of course, a couple crazies but mostly great buyers. I don't think there is a way to avoid them. If you're getting a lot of these people, maybe he is priced too low. I think the low priced horses draw out people who start asking/expecting ridiculous things.

Also, I agree that someone who wants to trail ride, etc is a fine home if they are willing to spend the money and would offer suitable care. A horse doesn't feel the urge to show - I think they'd be just as happy to relax in the pasture or go on a quiet trail ride.

I sold one horse to someone who intended to show and has only ended up going to a little schooling show once (she's had him over two years now). So the buyer who intends to show can end up with different priorities.

cyndi
Sep. 17, 2010, 11:56 PM
I have a very simple solution for avoiding crazy horse buyers. I never sell a horse! LOL!

moonlightride
Sep. 18, 2010, 12:27 AM
Actually the trail ladies expect a green horse who's not even described as a trail horse, to be bombproof totally push button. And these ladies say they have property, etc but want the horse for free. :( I've had emails where they describe how good they will treat the horse, how nice their property is, and horse has to be free or $500.
I've even had emails from people telling me they rescued a horse or all there horses were free, so they feel like I need to sell this horse for free to, etc, etc.
And then there's the folks that negotiate on the first line of the email without even calling or chatting about the horse.
So yes I really want to market towards hunter/jumper, dressage/and show folks and more serious riders.

CHT
Sep. 18, 2010, 11:41 AM
I would do up an email with links to photo/video and email it to the barns in your area.

Cheap horses can bring out the most unrealistic expectations.

I had two here recently and had people threaten me when I wouldn't let them come look at them, despite the fact I was trying to keep them from making the mistake of buying a super green horse for a super green rider. they just felt insulted.

The one that slipped through the cracks was mad at the owner as the horse wasn't trained as much as she had said (horse was advertised as green with 7 weeks pro training...I could walk/trot/canter and trot jumps on it) because miss can't post couldn't ride the horse.

Ended up selling both sight unseen to experienced homes (off of video).

cheval convert
Sep. 18, 2010, 08:26 PM
I have the opposite problem - how does one buy a horse without dealing with crazy owners? They tell you the horse is 16 hands and if it's 15 hands that's a generous measurement. They want a fair amount of money for a horse that hasn't been ridden in 2 years, is out of shape and other than being "trail safe" has little real training. Horse also drives except there was a mishap and it doesn't drive anymore. The list is endless. Sometimes I can figure it out by talking to them but usually I have to waste a day looking at horses that are not as advertised.:( (Did I mention that I hate horse shopping?)

Fixerupper
Sep. 18, 2010, 09:51 PM
it is the reason that agents charge the exorbitant prices they do for buy/sell :D

JackSprats Mom
Sep. 20, 2010, 08:20 PM
I don't think you can prevent them from contacting you, just weed them out once they do.

For emails that are unrealistic, simply don't answer them.

I talked to folks on the phone, tried to find out about them and then told them honestly if the horse was a match or not.

TheHorseProblem
Sep. 20, 2010, 09:15 PM
Raise your price.:)

No, seriously.

DarcyW
Sep. 20, 2010, 09:34 PM
I could share with you the story of "the humper" :eek: or how about the woman who punched, yes, closed fisted punch a horse in the face that she came to try:no:. I've got stories......and I have only sold a couple horses. I can't imagine people who make their living in horses. There should be a book put together but those outside of horses would think its fiction!!

twofatponies
Sep. 20, 2010, 09:38 PM
Raise your price.:)

No, seriously.

Absolutely. There are weird buyers at all levels, but the low end (free/cheap horses) seems to bring out extra of them.

RP
Sep. 21, 2010, 11:48 AM
Try dressagedaily.com. They seem to cater to serious buyers/sellers.

mvp
Sep. 21, 2010, 02:33 PM
What's with the hating of would-be buyers?

You must admit that you want "something for nothing," too. You don't want to spend the money putting the horse in a sales barn or training with someone who improves and sells horses.

I get it. I don't either. But that means that we are selling amateurs dealing with buying amateurs. And as other posters have said, the lower the price, the more unrealistic the searching buyer.... until you find The One with more knowledge than money. I'm that and I think we're becoming a rare breed.

Just to make things easy and interesting, why not try raising the price in the ads you have already placed? See what happens.

scheherazadetbmare
Sep. 21, 2010, 02:49 PM
I have the opposite problem - how does one buy a horse without dealing with crazy owners? They tell you the horse is 16 hands and if it's 15 hands that's a generous measurement. They want a fair amount of money for a horse that hasn't been ridden in 2 years, is out of shape and other than being "trail safe" has little real training. Horse also drives except there was a mishap and it doesn't drive anymore. The list is endless. Sometimes I can figure it out by talking to them but usually I have to waste a day looking at horses that are not as advertised.:( (Did I mention that I hate horse shopping?)

I learned this when horsehunting too. However, a seller just has to tell people that the horse is "unsuitable" if she doesn't want to deal with them. We buyers have to go out and look at the 16.3 horses who aren't, etc.
OP, just say horse is "unsuitable" for what prospective buyer wants him for. Of course some of those trail riding women might have a lot of money to spend on horses.

Melyni
Sep. 22, 2010, 04:15 PM
The cheaper horses do bring out the ones who want to try it on.

And you can always either ignore the email or just say "Sorry, No".

Since I breed them and raise them most of mine are young and green, and I get a few but very few who want one for a very low price, or free, I just say "sorry No".

Good Luck, keep sifting. Somewhere amongst all those folk are the perfect ones.

Ya gotta kiss a lotta frogs to find a Prince!

Yours
MW

Coppers mom
Sep. 22, 2010, 09:44 PM
I try to keep positive.

For example, I will never again be offended by a lowball offer since some moron e-mailed offering $800 for a $32,000 horse because the ad said "Or best offer". Everything's a step up from there, lol!

Blugal
Sep. 22, 2010, 10:11 PM
People who negotiate in the first line of their email are helping you. They are saying "this is my budget range, can you work with it?" If the answer is no, neither of you needs to waste more time.

Check your ad - if you are getting the same problem over and over, you need to change your ad. Just say in the ad that your horse is not a bomb-proof trail horse.

Don't discount the emails you get - serious buyers do want more info, and may appear to be tire-kicking, but you have to remember they are searching for "The One" in a sea of horses for sale, and have to try to figure out if your horse is "The One" by reading a 40-word ad and seeing one picture.

rothmpp
Sep. 22, 2010, 11:18 PM
It's the nature of the beast. Crazy buyers are part of the territory. I'd like to know how to avoid the crazy sellers. No, really, he's never been lame, I don't know why he can't trot without practically falling down today. I'm sure the vet said that he sticked him at 16.2, not 15.2.

I echo the posters who have said raise your price. Why are you pricing low? I would expect that a buyer is going to offer less that you are asking, as buyers almost always offer less than you are asking to start.

Don't flatly discount the trail rider type. If she's willing to pay what you will take for the horse - there's worse things for a horse to do in this world.

Secondly, the tire kickers do sometimes buy the horse. I'm that tire kicker. Against my better judgement, I went to look at a horse, never expecting that I would like him. Too young. too green, too small. He now is my competition horse with excellent placings up to and through regional championships.

Quest52
Sep. 22, 2010, 11:42 PM
in addition to all the good advice given so far... you could always try marketing at dressagemarket.com too. They've got a bunch of really great horses up there, and are strictly dressage based.

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Sep. 23, 2010, 02:24 PM
Easiest way: never sell a horse ;)

mvp
Sep. 23, 2010, 04:12 PM
I learned this when horsehunting too. However, a seller just has to tell people that the horse is "unsuitable" if she doesn't want to deal with them. We buyers have to go out and look at the 16.3 horses who aren't, etc.
OP, just say horse is "unsuitable" for what prospective buyer wants him for. Of course some of those trail riding women might have a lot of money to spend on horses.

Well... I'm the ranty sort and know a lot of words. So I like people to Say What They Mean.

If you say a horse is "unsuitable" long enough when you really mean that you don't want to deal with the buyer, the term is going to become understood as the diss it is. Just like I recently learned that "prep" means "drug." Euphemisms have a shelf life.

No, you don't need to tell the buyer they suck. How about after your description of what you have, their description of what they want and who they are you say:

"Look, I don't think this horse is going to do the job you want."

And if you think they won't hear that, and you really want to end the relationship then and there, you add:

"It would be a waste of your time and mine for you to come try him."

Price is the issue/insult?

"Sorry, I can't sell him for that."

Or even more truthful:

"Sorry, I won't sell him for that."

brightskyfarm
Sep. 23, 2010, 08:39 PM
I sell. I buy. Both sides of the fence has its problems. This is a marketing job and needs folks to be prepared to approach with
intelligence and ....Humor.
I have a Top Ten List... <g>
But..first... there is a little section in this forum for placing an ad...Free too...
and then...www.bigeq.com
and then....have you tried showing? eventing? taking your horse to events that showcase what he can do?
and... yes.. cheap horses get cheap people.
and ...yes... there are always cheap horses, but not always good cheap horses; you need to word your ad to claify the difference.
Good video's.. good pictures..
Back to that Top Ten List..
when a Buyer asks... send pics. (thats usually the wording)..
ask... and what would you like the horse to be doing?
their answer may give you a clue what they are REALLY looking for.
and....yes, you will have to play 20 questions on *how big is your breadbox*... since, already pointed out ... many folks are true novices at buying ...and selling.

Ultimately, it does come down to the ride.. and several times too. Yes, I, and many of you, can ride a horse a few turns of the ring, one fence and Know what the horses is or isnt! Those novices have NO clue..... many couldnt ride the last horse they owned!

A sense of humor ---
oh, on size...? in this day of cell phones? ask for a picture of the stick sizing the horse? detail to make sure the horse is standing on pavement... that solves that.

For those who are sellers....... find the horses best qualities... and sell those. I have many folks who bought horses trained in one venue who rode in another. TB's look awesome in western tack!

For those who are buyers... look inside, define your goals.. be realistic on what you are looking for.....
Many times Ive asked those buyers who say they want a novice level eventer... how did you do in the last event? and they reply that they never have evented...... or hunter paced....... or even
know how to jump..
yikes... >>.heres that sense of humor...

It tough ... on both sides.
this weeks #1 Top Ten is ..............................
#1....... and when your trainer is available to make the appt, we will make the appt, since you cannot buy the horse without the trainers ok.
:lol::lol::lol::lol:

moonlightride
Sep. 23, 2010, 10:55 PM
Thanks guys.

The lowball offers are usually in the first email. People ask for photos and ask if I can take $500 for the horse or even give the horse free because they got all their other trail horses free, etc. These people just ask to sell for a crazy price without looking at the horse first. Or people talk about how nice their facility is and that's why they deserve to have the horse for free.

These folks say "Hi, will you take $500 for this horse? Please send me photos.

or
"Hello, I saw your ad on dreamhorse and I am interested in your gelding. I have 20 acres with blah blah blah....... All my horses are very well taken care of, etc etc, etc. If you would like to give your gelding to a great home, we would love to welcome him to our horse family. We have 3 other horses we rescued...etc etc etc.

LittleblackMorgan
Sep. 24, 2010, 10:34 AM
I'm in the market for an eventing pony. Went and tried one, which was a free lease with buy out. Cool little pony, bare-bones training (as in, sometimes cantered, couldn't back, needed miles). Went back and forth with the owner about buy out price...I got "no more then X".

Well, X was ridiculously high for an unseasoned grade pony in a crappy market.

Went and tried another pony, fell madly in love. This one is slightly less, more training and more my kinda horse. I know he's been for sale for months through word of mouth and only very recently advertised.

HOWEVER-

because I feel that this is The One, I am fully prepared and comfortable to not even bother offering something lower then asking. Provided the little beast vets clean, the seller will get what she wants and so will I.

I'm a firm believer in the right horse finding its person. As a non-tire kicker, I never email or call someone and say "Hey, will you take X for this horse?" I called and set up an appointment. (I think phone calls speak volumes over email). How the hell can you determine what a horse is worth with out meeting him? The 1st pony I looked at sounded lovely over the phone. She was a cool pony, but after trying her and showing her to my trainer, I knew she was not worth CLOSE to the buy out. The other one? Well, he was worth what the 1st was offered at, but for sale for less.

patch work farm
Sep. 25, 2010, 11:43 PM
Quote: "Don't discount the emails you get - serious buyers do want more info, and may appear to be tire-kicking, but you have to remember they are searching for "The One" in a sea of horses for sale, and have to try to figure out if your horse is "The One" by reading a 40-word ad and seeing one picture."

When I am shopping for horses to buy, I do this strange thing and CALL THE SELLER for more information! Is it just easier to look at the internet and "assume" you can figure out if the horse is for you instead of calling the person selling it? I have found in just the last year, people will send me all kinds of emails but they no longer call. Don't most of us pay for long distance calls as a flat fee? I am amazed that I get emails as someone mentioned, negotiating almost immediately =the best one I got was "how negotiable are you? My friend just lost her job and doesn't have much money to spend..."

ummm, can she feed the horse?!!? I have to say it was probably the one time I was less than polite, I think I said something like...I "get" that your friend most likely now has the time to ride, but it sounds like she needs to concentrate on getting a job to support herself and her horse." I raised my prices.

I used to use dressagedaily and now they have so many ads that it is easy to get lost in the shuffle, it is a shame because it is a great web site if you have the time to go through all of the horses for sale.