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Borntorun
Sep. 2, 2010, 08:16 PM
Does anyone have concrete floors in their horse stalls? If so, do you like/dislike them and why? I'm in the process of building a new barn and would like to just concrete the everything so I don't have to worry about my stall floors becoming uneven over time. Thanks for your input!

Diamondindykin
Sep. 2, 2010, 08:24 PM
I have concrete under my mats and I LOVE it. I don't have any issues with urine under the mats at all and no smell either. IMO concrete is the way to go :yes:

goeslikestink
Sep. 2, 2010, 08:35 PM
most floors in uk are concrete as long as you do deep beds and banked sides as with any floor be it mats mud or concrete your horse will be fine

as deep beds and banked sides prevent hip hock and elbow sores plus prevent the horses getting cast, plus if you have a lame horse or a horse with lamnitus can support the foot or leg depending on type of bedding used

obviously shaving bed for a lamnitic pony as its soft and comforting for exsample

CB/TB
Sep. 2, 2010, 08:48 PM
Concrete/cement here, too. I have stall mats and bed deep. Plus,, now that I just have the one at home she spends pretty much 24/7 outside- except in bad weather.

Twiliath
Sep. 2, 2010, 08:59 PM
Concrete, even with mats, will eventually cripple your horse. DO NOT do it! If you research this with the universities who have done so or through articles in Practical Horseman or in the Chonicle, you'll find that it is NOT recommended!

spotmenow
Sep. 2, 2010, 10:25 PM
Concrete, even with mats, will eventually cripple your horse. DO NOT do it! If you research this with the universities who have done so or through articles in Practical Horseman or in the Chonicle, you'll find that it is NOT recommended!

Ditto. Don't do it. Use stone dust/sand and pack, pack, pack and then cover with rubber mats. Actually, I was told by one vet that wood floors are the best, but we have 'em on one side of the barn (we bought this barn, didn't build it) and I'm not a fan. However, as far as concrete goes, I don't even like concrete in aisle, in all honesty. Just MHO.

Mallard
Sep. 2, 2010, 10:29 PM
I have concrete floors in my barn...and OMG...no mats on top.
Just lots of shavings.
Been this way for the 17 years I have lived here and I have no lame horses. No hock sores either.

I know many others who have concrete with/without mats, and their horses are all fine.

One of my mares was stall-rested for eight months (nasty fracture of her ulna) in these stalls and she was, and still is 7 years later, fine.
Perfectly fine.

goeslikestink
Sep. 3, 2010, 07:52 AM
Ditto. Don't do it. Use stone dust/sand and pack, pack, pack and then cover with rubber mats. Actually, I was told by one vet that wood floors are the best, but we have 'em on one side of the barn (we bought this barn, didn't build it) and I'm not a fan. However, as far as concrete goes, I don't even like concrete in aisle, in all honesty. Just MHO.

best tell that tomost of uk then as most have concrete or cement floors
its not the floor but how much bedding you use
as people will use less with mats thinking its the best thing out, mtas only make a floor more even butt people will use less thinking mats save on bedding when in truth it doesnt

a horse laying on just hard mats with a little bedding or not is just the same as layiing on an uneven floor or hard surface

you put the bedding in to protect the horse but you put plenty in to support the horse during his rest period- so that it encourages the horse to lay down if he choses to and will protect him via preventing sores or getting cast
or suppport any injury etc

WaningMoon
Sep. 3, 2010, 08:01 AM
I would go talk to a few ppl who work on cement floors and ask how they feel about them. i know ppl who have had to give up their jobs due to not being able to work on the floors anymore.

There is NO give to cement, it is hard on legs, all legs, human or horse. The ppl I know who have bought barns with cement floors have cracked it to reduce the tension before putting down mats or whatever. I know some who have cracked it and then put down planks too.

use'szoo
Sep. 3, 2010, 08:14 AM
The barn that was already on my last property had cement floors. My wonderful husband laid pressure treated 2x4's on edge and then laid rough hewn boards on top of them (1 1/2 - 2" thick). That was covered with mats. This provided the "give" of a wood floor as well as fantastic drainage. Once a year, I would take up the mats and rough boards, clean out anything underneath and replace. This flooring system actually helped an old guy with bad suspensory ligaments regain soundness that he hadn't had in years.

Bluey
Sep. 3, 2010, 08:55 AM
Many against concrete floors are just guessing what makes sense to them, don't have much if any experience with real stables, that most are concrete.

Concrete is so much better all around, but you do have to bed it properly, just as with any other kind of flooring you may use.

Until mats came out, no sensible stable manager would have wanted to accept any other than concrete.

Practically all vet hospitals have concrete stalls as did every one of the barns I was in in Europe and mature horses lived long, sound lives 24/7 in there, properly bedded, of course.

Today, with mats, you can get by with dirt floors, the mats protecting them.

Tiki
Sep. 3, 2010, 09:44 AM
I would go talk to a few ppl who work on cement floors and ask how they feel about them.All hospitals have concrete floors with tile over them for maintaining an aseptic surface. Nurses and doctors wear thick soles shoes or clogs and do just fine on their feet for 8 or more hours. Anyone standing for 8 hours on any floor will get tired. It's not the concrete itself. Deep bedding is the way to go. It seems that many people in this country are too stingy to put in deep bedding. I've been to plenty of stables that have mats - so they don't have to do more than put in a handful of bedding to absorb the urine , they don't have to do much work to clean the stalls and they don't generate a big manure pile. Yuh, right.:no::mad::confused: Sore hocks and elbows anyone?? Stingy and lazy. It's really not that difficult to clean a well bedded stall.

goeslikestink
Sep. 3, 2010, 10:29 AM
All hospitals have concrete floors with tile over them for maintaining an aseptic surface. Nurses and doctors wear thick soles shoes or clogs and do just fine on their feet for 8 or more hours. Anyone standing for 8 hours on any floor will get tired. It's not the concrete itself. Deep bedding is the way to go. It seems that many people in this country are too stingy to put in deep bedding. I've been to plenty of stables that have mats - so they don't have to do more than put in a handful of bedding to absorb the urine , they don't have to do much work to clean the stalls and they don't generate a big manure pile. Yuh, right.:no::mad::confused: Sore hocks and elbows anyone?? Stingy and lazy. It's really not that difficult to clean a well bedded stall.

agree

and will add

a stable made of concrete or cement will support the horse if any serious leg injuries do to the fact that it doesnt flex or give so if the horse had say for a sernerio a ligment or tendon injury and was on box rest then the cenment or concrete floor would support the leg in keeping it stable - a mat or rough unven floor pebb dust or dirt does not as it gives as its only added ontop of the earth or dusty floor

also using mats alone you have to pull them up and clean underneath as they harbour germs p and allsorts so if one has an open injury then more likely to get infected as less bedding or hardly any bedding on top of a mat and or the horse could re injury himself due to the uneveness

a cement or or concrete floor can be sterilised
and with a good deep bed and banked sides can suppoort the horse with any injury providing you keep it all clean

horsepoor
Sep. 3, 2010, 01:44 PM
I personally do not like concrete stall floors, and seems this topic comes up regularly on COTH --here are links to a couple of relevant threads that might be worth checking out:

http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=269360

http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=258449

Borntorun
Sep. 4, 2010, 10:45 PM
Well, it seems it's 50/50 dirt to concrete for stalls! I've had dirt with gravel and mats for 12 years and my stalls are somewhat uneven. I also deeply bed the stalls with shavings. I want maintenance free flooring now. They will have mats and shavings and the horses won't be in there more than 12 hours during the summer months.

I find it hard to believe concrete will cripple a horse that's just standing still. The mats act as shock absorbers, just like tennis shoes do for people. After pricing concrete vs. bringing in stone dust and all the labor involved in packing it level, I think concrete is a much more economical way to go in the long run. Especially when you have to pour an aisle way anyway!

Fharoah
Sep. 5, 2010, 01:16 AM
I have packed dirt on rubber mats at my parents. If I ever build my own barn I will concrete with soft stalls http://www.softstall.com/softstall_thesystem.asp In fact I think I am going to have my horses stall cemented and soft stalled just trying to decide which stall he will keep forever as can't afford to do whole barn.

They have them at the equine hospital I go to and they only use a handful of shaving and easy to clean.

allpurpose
Sep. 5, 2010, 10:30 AM
If you are going with concrete, or already have it, are their drains installed as well? Just curious, don't mean to kidnap the thread...:confused:

KrazyTBMare
Sep. 5, 2010, 07:18 PM
I have concrete and LOVE it. Esp here in Florida where ants are a problem, if you have dirt or even dust floors, they will try to move in. Any if you use stone dust and pack it properly, it is just as hard as concrete. As mentioned above, you have to bed properly and yes, all the major vet clinics/hospitals use concrete as well. And yes, anyone standing all day is going to be sore - standing in dirt, concrete, carpet, doesnt matter.

KrazyTBMare
Sep. 5, 2010, 07:20 PM
If you are going with concrete, or already have it, are their drains installed as well? Just curious, don't mean to kidnap the thread...:confused:

Nope no drains. I bed with a fine shaving that actually absorbs the urine (though mine RARELY pee inside as they are in for 1 hr am to eat and the 4 hrs at night to eat). Plus went I pull up the mats and scrub/clean, the standing water does drain eventually through the concrete just like water on a sidewalk or driveway.

Auventera Two
Sep. 6, 2010, 07:33 PM
Concrete, mats, and deep shavings here. No problems. And one horse has arthritis in her hocks (had it when we got her). She's been here about 6 years or so and she's definitely not gotten any worse - maybe has gotten better. I bed so that there is always about a foot of bedding, even as they move around. I don't believe in the "sprinkle method" for shavings. They are free to come and go in the stalls or out to pasture as they choose. In the winter they are inside with the doors closed up about 12 hours, and outside with the option to come and go about 12 hours. We've been on this farm for 14 years and have yet to notice any "crippling." Gotta love the drama on the internet I guess.