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TKR
Aug. 13, 2010, 02:54 PM
I trapped a raccoon who had been eating my cats' food for a couple of weeks. Transported to an area that is wooded, no houses anywhere. Was trying to position the trap to release and she nipped my finger. So she was turned over to the Animal Control/Health Dept and will be tested for rabies. I will be getting a tetanus shot this afternoon. She just nipped the top of my middle finger but the skin around it came away and it's really sore. I've washed and peroxided it, put some antibacterial gel on it and wrapped. Any other recommendations? Should have results back Monday. I hated it, she looked young and like she is pregnant. Sure is sore where she got me!
PennyG

Bravestrom
Aug. 13, 2010, 03:07 PM
I would talk to your doctor about getting the rabies shot just in case. I was bitten years ago - back then it was shots in the stomach - I think it is just one shot now.

Keep an eye on it - you may also want to get antibiotics. if it gets red go to the doctor asap. You can get a very bad infection.

Bluey
Aug. 13, 2010, 03:13 PM
You won't need the rabies shots if it comes back negative.
Still, it is always good to have your Dr see your hand.

If at any time it starts to swell, get red or hurt, don't wait, go to the ER immediately.

A friend was feeding some feral cats and one bit her, it was caught and tested and was rabid, so she had to have those shots.
One evening her hand started turning red, she went right then to the ER and almost lost that hand to an infection.
They told her if she had waited until morning, she may have died.:eek:

Don't wait, if it looks suspicious, go get it looked at.:yes:

Sorry about the racoon, that is the way life is, one predator or other will get you, when you are a coon.:(

You can't be careful enough around wildlife.:no:

TKR
Aug. 13, 2010, 09:58 PM
Saw my doctor this afternoon. By then the skin around the little nick had sloughed off, so it is really sore without that layer of skin. I guess something in the saliva causes that? Anyway,had a tetanus shot and he cleaned and dressed the wound, gave me 'scripts for silvadene and Keflex to ward off any infection. Wants me to call on Monday when I get the health department report. I think the Silvadene is helping some, but when you are missing a layer of skin on the tip of a finger -- OUCH!!
PennyG

AKB
Aug. 13, 2010, 10:09 PM
You did the right thing by going in and getting the bite checked. I have no idea of what bacteria raccoons carry in their mouths. Cat bites often cause infection by pasturella bacteria, which are often not sensitive to Keflex. Therefore, watch the bite carefully for infection (redness, swelling or increased pain). I'm glad the raccoon is getting tested. Hopefully you can avoid rabies shots.

Jaegermonster
Aug. 13, 2010, 10:16 PM
They are about to pass an ordinance here prohibiting feeding domestic animals outside, esp after dark just to prevent such problems with wildlife and rabies.
People feed their cats outside, along comes the coons and the possums and tada, a rabies alert.
I'm sorry you were bitten, but I'm even more sorry that most likely the raccoon is already dead because it bit you.

RedMare01
Aug. 13, 2010, 10:27 PM
Keep an eye on it; Keflex is basically worthless as an antibiotic since so many bacteria are resistant to it. If it doesn't look better in a day or two, go back and ask for something stronger. :yes:

Caitlin

Bravestrom
Aug. 14, 2010, 08:37 AM
They are about to pass an ordinance here prohibiting feeding domestic animals outside, esp after dark just to prevent such problems with wildlife and rabies.
People feed their cats outside, along comes the coons and the possums and tada, a rabies alert.
I'm sorry you were bitten, but I'm even more sorry that most likely the raccoon is already dead because it bit you.

That was uncalled for. She was trying to move it - it is unfortunate - bet you never do anything wrong. She could have just shot it and be done with it.

TKR
Aug. 14, 2010, 10:23 AM
Thanks Promodus. Jaegermonster, I agree -- I only feed my barn cats a small amount in the afternoon so they don't have left overs at night. I have an old cat that likes the deck and she only gets a little bit too. The problem was the raccoon was actually coming through 2 windows into an indoor porch converted to a cat room attached to a more "outdoor" cat room (we love cats, LOL). The indoor room is heated and cooled for them but they have access to the outside. The night I caught her I ran her out of the porch first and then set the trap on the deck after closing a window. I honestly try to be responsible and almost just let her go and take the shots. I have been pretty upset that she had to be euth'd for testing because I was bitten. We will work it out better if we have to trap another one.

I'm trying to take care of this finger and it's a little better. If it looks like it's getting infected, I'll get back to my doctor. He's a great guy and will take good care of me on the antibiotics. The Keflex was just in case, so far I don't think I have any infection and I'm not yet foaming at the mouth or avoiding water.
Thanks for all the posts!
PennyG

Zu Zu
Aug. 14, 2010, 10:36 AM
Jingles for you ~ glad you had your doctor treat that finger ~

2ndyrgal
Aug. 14, 2010, 11:47 AM
But relocating wildlife is usually illegal in most states. I had a huge racoon/possum problem, my neighbor feeds LOTS of cats outside, they'd eat over there, then come sleep and s**t over at my place in the horsey hilton. After throwing away far too much hay and dealing with scat everywhere, I'd had enough. I trapped the first five and called the fish and game guy, who came and picked them up. Once I figured out he wasn't relocating them either, I simple started shooting them. They did thousands of dollars of damage to my barn, there is about 400 acres of fields and woods for them within a quarter mile of my barn. Late this spring, in 10 days time, I killed 5 raccoons and 3 possums. Since then, apparently word has gotten around the wildlife community that this is not a good habitat, and I haven't even seen any evidence of anything wild in my barn. When I trapped them, either the same ones or others kept coming back. I'm now not seeing any.

I love wildlife, though God's reason for possums escapes me, but much like wild animals do, I'll protect my habitat and territory.

Transporting a wild creature to unfamiliar territory would be like letting a pet go somewhere far from home. It's wrong on so many levels.

Be very thankful it was a mild bite and hope it stays only that.

Bluey
Aug. 14, 2010, 11:55 AM
Coons here have torn roofs, walls, doors and windows getting into buildings, so they are not welcome around where people live.

One fall, we had 11 coons, that kept coming to the house, jimming up the electric pipes and wires and digging all night on the roof.
We put metal around poles and every place they were using and they kept finding new ways to get up there.

After we trapped and shot them all, we have not had any more, at least not any that stayed around to do damage.

I don't like at all to shoot anything and was really sick after the first few, wishing they went somewhere else.
The trouble was that one could get incinerated on the wires and catch the house on fire, as the electric line man told us, so they had to go.

Some wildlife you really can't live with safely and resident coons are some of those.

Relocating them is iffy, as they either make their way back to their known territory or get injured and killed by whatever wildlife is boss where you release them, plus if they are sick, they may infect those in that area.

TKR
Aug. 14, 2010, 07:06 PM
Well, that's alot to consider. I had thought the local wildlife could adapt to another location and food sources in a natural habitat. Maybe not. I just hate the idea of killing anything just trying to survive, although in an opportunistic type of way. Maybe just keeping food in at night will be enough. Thanks!
PennyG

Bluey
Aug. 14, 2010, 07:21 PM
We humans have very restricted senses when it comes to the world around us.

There is no such thing as some place no one lives, we just are not aware of the marks and smells like wild animals are.
The world is an open book to them in that sense.
They read that kind of wold all the time, all kinds of scents and broken twigs and paths and whatever all they look for, just as we notice a beautiful sunrise or wild storm clouds.
The difference, their lives and next meal depend on noticing all around them in that manner.

When we relocate a coon, he immediately is aware of all that lives where he is now and has to scramble to find a niche there, that definitively is not empty space for him to make a home that easily.

When a feral cat ended up here a while back one evening, I bet he already was spooked by all the marks of this being a bobcat's territory and sure enough, he was assaulted by that bobcat that night.
He should have kept moving on.:(

Knowing the right frames of reference to navigate in this world is so different for every one of us and even more so for other species than we are.

Huntertwo
Aug. 14, 2010, 10:28 PM
Quote:
Transporting a wild creature to unfamiliar territory would be like letting a pet go somewhere far from home. It's wrong on so many levels.

-----------------------------------
I've read this many times on this board. Yet, I see animals relocated on television all the time.

Many bears that come too close to heavily populated (human) areas are often relocated to more remote places.

I've seen previously wounded animals cared for, then the rehabber *finds* a suitable place in which to let the animal loose. And so on.

DandyMatiz
Aug. 15, 2010, 12:09 AM
Quote:
Transporting a wild creature to unfamiliar territory would be like letting a pet go somewhere far from home. It's wrong on so many levels.

-----------------------------------
I've read this many times on this board. Yet, I see animals relocated on television all the time.

Many bears that come too close to heavily populated (human) areas are often relocated to more remote places.

I've seen previously wounded animals cared for, then the rehabber *finds* a suitable place in which to let the animal loose. And so on.

There is a big difference from Joe Blow letting a bunch of coons loose in non-familiar territory (to them) .. and people who study areas (usually for quite awhile) and release animals. They don't just tranqualize a bear and let it loose. there are people who study areas they intend to relocate wildlife, lookiing into the how much wildlife the area can support, how many are already in the area, etc. They don't just drop a bear into another bear's territory and say have a nice day. Same for every species that is relocated.
If you trap a coon, and drive it an hour away and dump it, you have no idea of the feasibility for the area to handle another racoon. you also most likely have not tested the animal and seen if it has anything that could spread to other wildlife.

enjoytheride
Aug. 15, 2010, 08:55 AM
So the point is the next time you find a raccoon eating your cat's food you should take out a shotgun and blow its head off.

Then post about it on COTH and everyone will jump on you for not relocating it.

My Two Cents
Aug. 15, 2010, 11:03 AM
TKR - Thank you for trying to do the right thing even though it didn't work out this time. Sometimes relocation works and at least you were willing to give it try. Sometimes other methods (aka, shotgun) become necessary to protect other animals. If the coon had killed some of your cats (or given them rabies) you would be feeling worse then having to euth. one coon for your own health and safety. Hope your finger is feeling better and that the tests come back as a non rabies result. Be sure to let us know if that foaming and fear of water develops. lol

Bluey
Aug. 15, 2010, 11:20 AM
Quote:
Transporting a wild creature to unfamiliar territory would be like letting a pet go somewhere far from home. It's wrong on so many levels.

-----------------------------------
I've read this many times on this board. Yet, I see animals relocated on television all the time.

Many bears that come too close to heavily populated (human) areas are often relocated to more remote places.

I've seen previously wounded animals cared for, then the rehabber *finds* a suitable place in which to let the animal loose. And so on.

Yes, some carefully relocated animals make it fine, I am sure, then some don't.

Our game warden rehabbed a snow egret someone found hurt.
Once he was fine, he came here to release it by a pond, hoping the egret would find his way back to other egrets.

Next morning, some coyote had egret breakfast early, because we found a pile of white feathers by the edge of the dam.
We didn't tell the game warden, no sense in sadden him with it, but that is the nature of rehabbing and relocating, some times is just doesn't work, for the some times it does.

Relocating coons, well, I think that weights on the possibly more harmful than helpful column, as plenty of post have explained why.

Do be very, very careful when handling wild life, rabies, rare that it is in humans, we tend to be more protected from it than other species by being generally less exposed to infection, can be terrible, as this very sad story at the end of this article tells:


http://bovinevetonline.com/newsCNL1.asp?contentid=1206296

---"Without immediate treatment, rabies almost always kills its victims. It is an unusual event in the United States, but it is a problem that kills more than 50,000 people around the world every year.

KVUE.com tells the story of Zack Jones, a 16-year-old who died from rabies four years ago after a bat flew into his room while he was sleeping. “We know the bat woke him up it was fluttering in his face — that’s what he said,” said Connie Jones, his mother.

He was not bitten, and Zach and his parents did not realize he could have contracted rabies so they missed the short window to get Zach treated. “He said mom there’s something really wrong with me. It’s my mind I can’t sleep I’m having little seizures,” his mother said he later told her.

The Jones’ said Zach’s condition puzzled doctors too. “They didn’t realize Zach had rabies and second, rabies had taken over Zach. He had a very small chance of survival,” his mother said.

One week after he noticed his first symptoms, rabies killed Zach. “This is something we’ve been praying for and hoping for,” his parents said about the ongoing research for a rabies cure."---

Sipsi
Aug. 15, 2010, 01:10 PM
I know this is a late post, but you should have gone to your doctor (nearly wrote vet...) and get a gamma globulin shot. This kicks starts your immune system. It would be the first in the rabies series anyway. The series is: gamma globulin, and 1 rabies shot. Second rabies shot at 14 days, third rabies shot at 28 days. Voice of experience - I am a wildlife rehabber who doesn't normally do rabies vector species, but I ended up with a rabid bat - serves me right for grabbing it just before the 7 year old reached it, but that is another story. Oh, and the shots are just under the skin, although some are into the muscle - some debate about the efficacy.

As for release and relocating wildlife: we don't trap healthy animals, just get people to practice exclusion. Adult mammals especially don't do well trapped. Juveniles would be run off anyway, so they adapt better. Like I said, I'm a state and federally permitted rehabber. I mostly do birds of prey (hawks, owls and eagles), and wading birds (egrets, herons etc.) and we rehab and successfully release hundreds of birds a year. All of our birds are banded, some are tracked. Unless you have the proper facilities, the knowledge etc. you will not be successful. And the game warden might have had good intentions, but unless they have been specifically trained to rehab, it would have been better to turn the egret over to a permitted rehabber. Sorry, soap box!


Hope the test comes back negative....

Bluey
Aug. 15, 2010, 01:53 PM
Right, much to consider there.
I did not mention that the game warden was working under the direction of our vet, that is certified for wildlife rehabbing in our area, not all vets are, so was not completely on his own.

I did wonder why they choose here (we are a wildlife preserve, have been since 1957) to release it at that time, when some miles further South there is another wildlife preserve with a more appropiate water source for that.:confused:

It sure is easier to see what should have been done, in hindsight.:(
That was a beautiful bird to see.:)

Jaegermonster
Aug. 15, 2010, 04:42 PM
That was uncalled for. She was trying to move it - it is unfortunate - bet you never do anything wrong. She could have just shot it and be done with it.

Hardly. it didn't have to happen at all. She didn't have to feed her animals outside, she didn't have to try to catch it, and she didn't have to try to move it. Then she would not have been bitten and an innocent animal wouldn't be dead.
It could have all been avoided.

and enjoy the ride, no she doesn't have to just shoot it. That's a little extreme. It could all have been avoided by not feeding domestic animals outside, and/or by not leaving food out and accessible to wild animals.

rcloisonne
Aug. 15, 2010, 05:19 PM
Hardly. it didn't have to happen at all. She didn't have to feed her animals outside, she didn't have to try to catch it, and she didn't have to try to move it. Then she would not have been bitten and an innocent animal wouldn't be dead.
It could have all been avoided.

and enjoy the ride, no she doesn't have to just shoot it. That's a little extreme. It could all have been avoided by not feeding domestic animals outside, and/or by not leaving food out and accessible to wild animals.
Amen.

wendy
Aug. 15, 2010, 05:19 PM
yeah, usually wildlife "problems" can be resolved peacefully by simply making your locale a bit less attractive. However, it's much more humane to quickly dispatch a wild animal by shooting than to trap it, stress it out of its mind, and then dump it somewhere where it's probably going to starve to death/ fight with the local animals/ or get eaten because it doesn't know the area and has no boltholes set up.
It's illegal in most places to try to relocate raccoons.

Huntertwo
Aug. 15, 2010, 06:02 PM
Hardly. it didn't have to happen at all. She didn't have to feed her animals outside, she didn't have to try to catch it, and she didn't have to try to move it. Then she would not have been bitten and an innocent animal wouldn't be dead.
It could have all been avoided.

and enjoy the ride, no she doesn't have to just shoot it. That's a little extreme. It could all have been avoided by not feeding domestic animals outside, and/or by not leaving food out and accessible to wild animals.

Another Amen!

OP, this is not intended directly at you, so please don't take offense.

I found raccoons in my garage eating the dog food. Extremely simple solution? I didn't leave food out anymore and closed the door, so they couldn't get in. Case closed.

I don't know why in this case the raccoon needed to have been trapped. :confused:

This is a very good reason if one is just passing through, leave it alone.
You could have been seriously bitten by an animal who was simply frightened, which is what happened.

Maybe farm owners or people who are apt to have more contact with wild animals would benefit from having the Rabies Vaccine.

I work with Feral Cats and had the series of vaccines. 3 vaccinations, very simple and didn't hurt. ;)

TKR
Aug. 15, 2010, 08:05 PM
Yes, I fully understand the criticisms. However, this raccoon was actually coming through two windows left open about 8" for my cats to access their outside room and their air conditioned/heated porch, which is part of our HOUSE! I had chased her away a number of times. My old cat stays on the deck which is high with a closed door to the porch. Her food is minimal and I had been taking it up at night once she was done. We are in a wooded area with a pond a few yards from the deck. There is plentiful wildlife, which we enjoy watching and don't feed or try to attract. I also have done rescue for aeons, all of my cats are rescues in some manner and many were also feral. I also have tame and feral barn cats, which I trap and spay/neuter. I've placed some kittens from females that appeared pregnant and kept some. All of my dogs are also rescues except my GSD. I do my part and try to be responsible. I did not need this raccoon coming into my house and eating with my cats INSIDE! Instead of killing her, I elected to relocate -- maybe not a great idea but made the effort. So, crucify me -- I've probably taken care of and rescued more than all of you collectively that are being critical and should own stock in my vets business from all the spay/neuters we've done. Sorry if you are offended!
PennyG

mustangtrailrider
Aug. 15, 2010, 08:53 PM
Well, I have no patience for wildlife invading my space. Under those circumstances, I would have done/tried to do the same thing.

Ghazzu
Aug. 15, 2010, 10:21 PM
an innocent animal wouldn't be dead.


I have to chuckle at the idea of "innocent" being used to describe a coon.

Of course, having had the siding ripped off my henhouse, and the entire population slaughtered and their gizzards ripped out, I could be a little prejudiced...

WendellsGirl
Aug. 15, 2010, 10:49 PM
I'm confused how to feed the barn cats without teasing the raccoons?

Jaegermonster
Aug. 15, 2010, 11:06 PM
You feed them in a tackroom or other enclosed area, let them eat and take up whatever is left. Or where ever you feed them, take up what is left within an hour or so, and feed them early enough in the day that night wandering wildlife is not out and about. Key is feed them during daylight hours. You might have a few that go hungry for a day or so, but they are smart and soon learn to show up when the vittles are being dished out. And really how much do you want to feed a real barn cat? Just enough to keep him sticking around.

And TKR, I'm hardly offended, we really don't need to have the I rescued more than you contest. I have done more than my share of both domestic animals and wildlife and volunteer regularly at the animal shelter as well as do cruelty investigations lets don't go there because, well, really it isnt relevant.

None of this needed to happen, the raccoon didn't need to be caught, you didn't need to be bitten, it all happened because of decisions you made that ultimately cost an animal it's life. So own up to it, learn from it and figure out a better way to do it next time so it doesn't happen again. Like if you need to trap it how bout calling someone who knows what they're doing to do it for you.

Jaegermonster
Aug. 15, 2010, 11:10 PM
Well, I have no patience for wildlife invading my space. Under those circumstances, I would have done/tried to do the same thing.

to be technical, YOU probably invaded THEIR space first.

carolprudm
Aug. 16, 2010, 08:04 AM
Well, I have no patience for wildlife invading my space. Under those circumstances, I would have done/tried to do the same thing.

Agreed.

OP, I hope your hand is OK

Alagirl
Aug. 16, 2010, 08:52 AM
Well, that's alot to consider. I had thought the local wildlife could adapt to another location and food sources in a natural habitat. Maybe not. I just hate the idea of killing anything just trying to survive, although in an opportunistic type of way. Maybe just keeping food in at night will be enough. Thanks!
PennyG


Update pls once the results come back.

I mean, I hate when stuff dies, but by all means, Racoons are not a rare species. They are more like gigantic rats. ;)

Skinless fingers are no fun! I hope all heals well.

TKR
Aug. 16, 2010, 09:34 AM
Thanks to all of those who have offered support. To Jaegermonster, who is apparently perfect and knows everything -- I've been using humane traps since I was a little kid. I've trapped enough to know how to handle it, it was one of those instances that just happened. Yes, the raccoon had to go -- she was coming in my house. I've also worked with the local wildlife rescue, rescuing wild. I have spent my entire life and $$ helping, rescuing and taking care of animals -- almost all of my small animal population is a rescue -- and I take care of over 20 of those a day, by myself for the most part and drain my bank account doing so -- they eat the good stuff! So, I guess I run my own little shelter and "volunteer" 24/7. I've testified in a cruelty case -- and won! I regularly help out with donations to animal groups, write letters -- just helped a mare stay out of the kill pen -- who was not the first! My interest and knowledge is not at the novice level. Is it difficult being so sanctimonous and self-rightous? Sure, it was my mistake -- feel better? But my mistake was not handling the trap better -- Not interested in a pissing contest with you, I have nothing to prove or justify. I care about animals to the nth degree and do all I can to safeguard them. I feel terrible about the raccoon. I am NOT feeding my cats outside or leaving food outside at night. Now I'll go say some "Hail Marys" and do a "Mea Culpa" and hopefully she wasn't rabid. My sinceresty apologies to you and the raccooon for my protecting my home and cats from an animal who had access to many other natural food sources. Enjoy your mistake-free life!
PennyG

Bluey
Aug. 16, 2010, 09:45 AM
How is your finger today?

Remember, an infection can take off like wildfire, so if anything looks or feels different, don't wait to see a Dr., get it looked ASAP in the ER.:yes:

Alagirl
Aug. 16, 2010, 10:11 AM
to be technical, YOU probably invaded THEIR space first.


rofl, we are not talking native Americans and pale faces, we are talking short lived critter moving in pre-existing structure...:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

Aggie4Bar
Aug. 16, 2010, 11:16 AM
So how's the finger? Did you ever get word if the coon tested negative?

We have "wildlife rehabber" a couple miles behind us that feeds raccoons off her back porch. As a result, we have a booming coon population. I don't like the thought of shooting anything and neither does my husband. Raccoons scream and sound just like toddler, which makes it worse. However, they have caused damage to our property, and given the human-assisted population explosion, a separate human-assisted cull is more/less unavoidable.

Tiki
Aug. 16, 2010, 12:37 PM
Keep an eye on it; Keflex is basically worthless as an antibiotic since so many bacteria are resistant to it. If it doesn't look better in a day or two, go back and ask for something stronger.Keflex is not worthless in the right situation.

Also, it is not a matter of using a 'stronger' antibiotic as it is of using one to which the organism is sensitive. It may be what you might consider a 'milder' antibiotic.

However, there is really no such thing as a milder or stronger antibiotic, it is a matter of using one to which the organism is sensitive.

TKR
Aug. 16, 2010, 02:46 PM
Good news for me -- the testing came back negative. So, I guess I won't have to undergo a series of injections. My finger is healing, much less sore, but still a bit raw so keeping it covered and meds on. Thanks to all that were concerned. Hopefully I won't have any other wildlife incidents.
Cheers!
PennyG

Alagirl
Aug. 16, 2010, 02:47 PM
welding gloves FTW :winkgrin:

Zu Zu
Aug. 16, 2010, 03:16 PM
Good news ~ glad you are healing up and no shots are required ~ Jingles

craz4crtrs
Aug. 16, 2010, 04:11 PM
Good news for me -- the testing came back negative. So, I guess I won't have to undergo a series of injections. My finger is healing, much less sore, but still a bit raw so keeping it covered and meds on. Thanks to all that were concerned. Hopefully I won't have any other wildlife incidents.
Cheers!
PennyG

Good for you. I am very tired of raccoons. We never used to have any at all, now there are plenty. I used to keep my garage door cracked for our outside kitties but can't do that anymore. So kitties if they decide to stay out have no food overnight. Raccoons are hard on baby bunnies, but I guess we have plenty. It is disconcerting to go out to the barn and find bunny parts and know it isn't the cats.

If we see them up by the house, they are fair game for my husband. Our lab chases them off regularly. When she sounds off when put out potty after dark, we figure its those stupid raccoons.

Like coyotes, the raccoons are vermin.

I am glad your finger is ok. I don't think I would be so nice next time. :cool:

mustangtrailrider
Aug. 16, 2010, 04:22 PM
TKR, It is wonderful news that you are alright. I think that wildlife belongs where it is wild. I choose to live in the wild areas. I absolutely enjoy it! I love going outside seeing the birds, snakes, deer, squirrel, turkey, eagle, etc...I can't name it all. I apologize I got carried away. I most certainly try to live in peace with all animals. I do what I can where I can when I can.

We do not have a coon problem here. We have more than our fair share of snakes. I have yet to have a close run in with one. I have passed by a few on trail. They happily go on there merry way.

OP, glad you are ok....

Jaegermonster
Aug. 16, 2010, 08:21 PM
I too am glad the OP is ok, I've had the rabies series myself, I hate shots.

mustangtrailrider
Aug. 16, 2010, 09:10 PM
Maybe, but I ain't letting them in my house.

TKR
Aug. 16, 2010, 10:30 PM
Thanks Jaegermonster -- I'll bet we have alot more in common than not. I share your concerns, interest and passion for all animals and certainly regret the loss of life.
PennyG

mustangtrailrider
Aug. 16, 2010, 10:45 PM
It is always a shame when human vs wildlife come in conflict.

elysian*fields*farm
Aug. 17, 2010, 02:07 AM
TKR- Glad you are going to be okay rabies-wise, and your finger is healing. It is a shame the raccoon had to be PTS. I know you were just trying to protect your cats and, well, sometimes things don't go right even when we have the best of intentions.

I have to say that raccoon - peopple encounters don't just happen in the country. When my son was in college, he rented an apartment in an old home in downtown Baton Rouge-- less than four blocks from the state capitol building.

Anyway, I was visiting him one afternoon- broad daylight about 3 pm. We were sitting on the steps to his place and had the door open. While we were sititng there- a huge raccoon-- the size of a beagle really- came from across the street-- where a lady put out food for the stray cats in her back yard -- and he walked right past us up the steps(we were afraid to move he was so close) and into my son's three room apartment!!

Well, we waited outside trying to decide whom to call. We heard some noise coming from the kitchen, and that raccoon walked out big as Dallas and bold as a brass jackass with a chicken leg bone from the kitchen trash in its mouth. Well, my son told his landlord, who promised to talk to the neighbor about putting out so much cat food in her yard. She agreed to cut back drastically-- it was costing her a fortune anyway.

About a month later, my son was awakened in the middle of the night by a terrible crash coming from his kitchen-- apparently, with their ready food source gone- the raccoons had managed to get into the space over the kitchen ceiling-probably climbed up through the walls- those old houses don't have fire stops in the walls-- and had chewed a hole in the ceiling sheetrock-and then a whole family- mama and three or four babies fell down into the kitchen.

They were pretty terrified- but so was my son when he switched on the light and found an angry mama raccoon threatening him for fear he was after her babies. John beat a hasty retreat to his truck- leaving the apartment door open-- there was only one exit door-- and it was through his bedroom/ sitting room.

Well the raccoons finally left, but first they tore into his bread and ate some of each piece, knocked everything off the kitchen counters, opened some of the cabinets and got into his sugar and flour. The even managed to get the top off a jar of peanut butter. (They apparently can use those cute hand-like paws to unscrew jar tops) And they chewed their way into a bottle of cooking oil. They left lots of messy, greasy peanut butter, flour, sugar and who-knows-what footprints all over his futon bed --I guess you have the picture.

At the end of the semester, my son decided to move back home to the country and commute to LSU. He had enough of the city's wildlife.

Yes wildlife is wonderful-- especially when it stays outside!! Inside- it is a whole other story. Hope this story gave you a laugh TKR-- you probably need a few after what you've been through. :)

poltroon
Aug. 17, 2010, 02:44 AM
OP: glad it came back negative.

Next time, wear heavy gloves!

You might also consider a magnet-keyed cat door for the cats.

Aggie4Bar
Aug. 17, 2010, 09:49 AM
At the end of the semester, my son decided to move back home to the country and commute to LSU. He had enough of the city's wildlife.That's funny. I think most people associate coons with the country without realizing that they're a species that benefit from human presence and are often more abundant in densely (human) populated areas. I was waiting at a Houston intersection a couple months ago - very busy and developed area - when a young raccoon went gallumping across 6 lanes of traffic and up under an overpass. At least it was crossing on a "walk" cycle, or it would have been one more among many road-killed coons I see daily.

Alagirl
Aug. 17, 2010, 10:28 AM
As a smart species, they know there is no hunting season in town...:D

Jaegermonster
Aug. 17, 2010, 12:36 PM
Thanks Jaegermonster -- I'll bet we have alot more in common than not. I share your concerns, interest and passion for all animals and certainly regret the loss of life.
PennyG

I think we do too, I'm very sorry the raccoon had to die although I do understand many others feelings towards them. I don't want them hanging around my place either for many of the same reasons. I'm glad you're ok.

TheRedFox
Aug. 20, 2010, 01:55 PM
Have not had time to read through this entire thread, so apologize if someone has already said this. Unless you are trained in the capture and relocation of wildlife, it is definitely in your best interest to call the people who are. Especially when dealing with raccoons.

Raccoons are fun to look at and watch, especially when they are interacting with each other, but dont let them fool you; they are nasty vicious little critters.

Raccoons carry a plethora of diseases like Rabies, dysentery, and harmful bacterial diseases just to name a few, but that is the least of your worries when you trap one. Coons may be small but they can definitely pack a huge punch. They have been known to scrap with German Shepherds to the death and live to talk about it, leaving the dog in pieces. Given the chance, they'll rip your face right off your head if you give them the opportunity.

There's a story about a man in LA that kept a pet raccoon. For 10 years this raccoon was his little buddy. The coon slept on the bed, ate at the table, and even rode to town with his owner on the bench seat in the old f250 ford. One day the man was driving into town with his critter on a long stretch of two lane highway when he noticed his little furry friend reposed on the bench seat with a strange look in his eye. The man didnt think anything about this coon with a hungry look, next thing you know, that coon jumped on that man's face and ripped his throat out. (think Jurassic Park when the little dino jumps into the Jeep with the fat guy and gobbles him up) By some miracle the man survived. True story (mostly) that just goes to show that these cute little guys mean business.

Re-locations happen all of the time and animals learn to adapt to their new surroundings easily. But, leave it to the professionals to trap and move them (at least raccoons) because they are just to darn unpredictable. You're very lucky you didnt lose your finger, or worse, your hand.

Summit Springs Farm
Aug. 20, 2010, 03:14 PM
I am picky I don't like any other animals on my farm, just the ones I've brought here.To all the other ones I'd be happier if they weren't here. But that's not how it works!

carp
Aug. 20, 2010, 06:07 PM
I've just discovered that you can now get cat doors with microchip readers built into them. The flap opens for cats (or little dogs) with an authorized chip; it stays sealed for stray cats, possums, coons, and other animals you don't want. A cat door like this might be a solution to the problem of keeping the barn cats fed without ending up with wildlife in your tackroom or sunporch. One of the models I saw could be programmed to recognize 32 different microchips. I hope you aren't feeding more barn cats than that!

Bluey
Aug. 20, 2010, 07:43 PM
I've just discovered that you can now get cat doors with microchip readers built into them. The flap opens for cats (or little dogs) with an authorized chip; it stays sealed for stray cats, possums, coons, and other animals you don't want. A cat door like this might be a solution to the problem of keeping the barn cats fed without ending up with wildlife in your tackroom or sunporch. One of the models I saw could be programmed to recognize 32 different microchips. I hope you aren't feeding more barn cats than that!

I have seen a hole in the roof where a coon wanted in that house and a hole in the wall to the tackroom a coon made to get in there.

I don't think an electronic cat door would stand a chance to a coon wanting in there, but it may keep other critters out.