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MNewbie
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:20 AM
I may be new to the posting in forums, but I'm a good lurker and I've read all that I can find about towing and read the COTH commandments but I have a question about towing with a non-truck. *duck, covers* :)

My husband is a car guy. He's VERY supportive of the horse habit and his contribution to my new/first horse purchase is to find a trailer and tow vehicle. We live in Minnesota, so he'd like to find something he can use as a commuter when the weather turns bad to spare his '10 Camero and '70 Camero (see: car guy) from the road grime.

All about the tow guides and weight ratings will be investigated thoroughly when we narrow down the vehicle/trailer combo of choise.

I'm interested in what others have used for towing and whether you'd reccomend them - things that are NOT trucks, either half to full tons. We would be towing maybe a couple times a month, an hour or so, in flat country. Tom is leaning toward the large SUV's.

And I realize that it would probably be best, in this situation, to purchase/identify the trailer first and buy the vehicle to fit it.

FWIW, I myself lean toward an older truck and just be assured that it could haul anything, anytime, anyplace. BUT, in the spirit of research, does anyone have a non-truck that would be a good compromise for hauling one horse short distances.

Last night he tossed out the idea of a '95 Ford Bronco and I just cringed. My father drove an '88 Ford Bronco and when just lightly tipped on the rear fender when tumbling like a toy until he landed upside down in a ditch hanging my a seatbelt. So obviously my mind goes to the dark place when you put a trailer on the end of a Bronco. This is what I need to nip in the bud, regardless of how much "power" a Bronco might have. :D

Thanks, Elizabeth

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:32 AM
A Ford Bronco is in no way, shape, or form a "large SUV". By today's standards, a '95 Ford Bronco is a very, very small SUV.

I wouldn't haul an American trailer with anything but a truck unless it was a Brenderup or similar model designed to be towed with a smaller vehicle. That being said, I wouldn't buy a Brenderup, so I guess that doesn't really matter.

I know several people that tow (very) small bumper pulls with Lincoln Navigators or Ford Expeditions. That's probably the smallest SUV that anyone is going to suggest here. They claim to have never experienced any issues, but again, I wouldn't do it.

dkcbr
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:32 AM
Suburban or Expedition. :)

SGray
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:33 AM
wheelbase on Bronco is insufficient

dkcbr
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:38 AM
Adding that I hauled all over the place in the 70s and 80s with a full-size Jeep Cherokee with NO issues whatsoever. :yes:

I also have hauled a Sterling Eq-One and Cotner Lone Star with, variously, the smaller Jeep Cherokee (:no: ), a Ford Explorer ( :yes: ) and - currently - a Toyota 4Runner ( :yes: :yes: ).

I have downsized from a 3/4 ton towing a Hawk 2-horse bumper pull. So I'm on the side of "you don't absolutely NEED a huge honkin' truck" IF you choose the appropriate trailer.

SmartAlex
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:39 AM
We used to tow a two horse aluminum with an Expedition. It did absolutely awesome!

Janet
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:50 AM
The (long) weelbase of the tow vehicle is crucial. Otherwise you get "the tail wagging the dog."

I tow with a full sized van (Ford E35o 12 passenger) - same chassis and powertrain as a pickup.

If you go for an SUV, make sure it has a LONG wheelbase.

GallopHer
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:55 AM
I've pulled my aluminum 2 horse trailer with 4" dressing room very successfully with my Ford Expedition - since 1999 - and never any issues.

Best of luck with your decisions.

GoForAGallop
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:55 AM
Adding that I hauled all over the place in the 70s and 80s with a full-size Jeep Cherokee with NO issues whatsoever. :yes:

I also have hauled a Sterling Eq-One and Cotner Lone Star with, variously, the smaller Jeep Cherokee (:no: ), a Ford Explorer ( :yes: ) and - currently - a Toyota 4Runner ( :yes: :yes: ).


Yeah, keeping in mind that those original Cherokees weighed freaking 6000lbs!! No joke! And they had a 112'' wheelbase, which is still less than the "recommended" today, but they were NOT lightweight vehicles. My giant steel 87 Suburban weighs less!

My heart does break for that poor small Cherokee though. :( I have one, and I love the dear, but she is not a tow vehicle.

OP, your husband's Cameros have more than enough power to pull a horse trailer. But point out to him that there is a lot more to towing than just being able to move the trailer forward.

MNewbie
Aug. 10, 2010, 11:59 AM
OP, your husband's Cameros have more than enough power to pull a horse trailer. But point out to him that there is a lot more to towing than just being able to move the trailer forward.

Oh - I love that! :lol: The ONE time I had to drive his Camero to the barn b/c he had my car, I heard about the caked on mud endlessly! Would rather not go to the barn than drive his cars out there (well, almost). :cool:

jn4jenny
Aug. 10, 2010, 12:22 PM
For a traditional, extremely lightweight two-horse bumper pull? Wouldn't go smaller than a Tahoe. An Expedition or Suburban, which is basically a dumbed-down version of a 1/2 ton truck, would be better.

If you're asking what's *possible*, I have seen Pony Club moms hauling with Dodge Durango's and even Dakota or Ranger sized trucks. I would not feel safe in such a rig.

Your alternative is to buy a Brenderup, which can be pulled by a much smaller SUV. I pull mine happily with a 93" wheelbase and 168 hp. On the other hand, B'ups are expensive and have minimal storage space, so they're not the solution for everyone.

LisaB
Aug. 10, 2010, 12:32 PM
Just don't skimp. Your hubby doesn't realize that you're pulling live weight back there. And it doesn't take kindly to the tail wagging the dog (like that one, Janet!)
The only successful suv I've seen that hasn't had transmission/braking issues is the Suburban.

lovemyoldguy
Aug. 10, 2010, 12:58 PM
My mother and I were just talking about this very issue last night and cringing at our ignorance...when I was a Pony Clubber, we used our '88 Cherokee (smaller size, NOT a Grand Cherokee) to haul our bumper-pull 2-horse Shoop. With two larger horses. :eek: And no one told us that was bad! At least we had anti-sway bars and Mom was a super-conservative driver, but still... :no:

MelanieC
Aug. 10, 2010, 01:17 PM
I'll be following this thread. I have no horse as of yet (working on it) and no trailer. We have a Toyota Tacoma v4 (2005, I think) that I had assumed would be unable to tow a trailer. I'm only going to have one horse, and I've seen one-horse trailers on display at shows, but it seems like it's better to have a two-horse trailer so that you can share and/or not be doomed to trail ride alone (which seems unsafe). Our other vehicles are a Honda Element and a Toyota Prius, so obviously they're of no use.

I know it would be better to buy a bigger truck, but a trailer AND a new truck is going to take a while to talk my husband into. In the meantime I suppose I shall remain trailer-less.

DMK
Aug. 10, 2010, 02:39 PM
Most of the full size SUVs like an expedition, navigator, etc. are fully rated to tow everything an F150 tows (and built on the same frame), and you really do not need to be worried about starting, stopping, wear and tear on the vehicle - they are plenty durable in that area. They do have a slightly shorter wheelbase, BUT if you get a higher end one like the Eddie Bauer, it has load leveling suspension, and that compensates for a lot of sway.

I have a 2000 Eddie Bauer and a 2 horse trail et NY. I've hauled that trail et with the spedition and long bed F150s, F250s, regular super duty and extra long V10 crew cab for significant stretches of highway and hills (400-1400 miles) and while the pulling part was a treat with the F250 (kind of overhorsed for the job, so to speak), I can honestly say that load leveling suspension obviously compensates for a LOT of sway, since I have never seen an appreciable difference in sway between any of the vehicles. On the other hand, load leveling suspension is very expensive to repair and it WILL fail (mine has lasted an amazing 10.5 years and 182K miles) so you pick your poison.

But if you do get a half ton SUV or a half ton truck w/o LLS, I would recommend an aftermarket air spring kit (approx $125) that fits inside the coil - that's going to provide more stability than a coil alone, and spare your shocks some wear and tear as well.

eponacelt
Aug. 10, 2010, 03:16 PM
Suburban or Expedition. :)

This. Look at wheelbase - that is probably one of the most critical numbers when shopping. There is a minimum number for horse trailer stability, but I can't remember what it is.

joiedevie99
Aug. 10, 2010, 03:23 PM
Jeep Grand Cherokee with V8 Hemi engine and heavy duty tow package/upgraded rear axle ratio - pulls a Brenderup Baron

Friends....

Nissan Armada pulls 2 horse Sundowner slant

Nissan Armada pulls Brenderup Royal

Tahoe pulls Hawk 2h, no dressing room

3/4 ton Suburban pulls steel 2H with dressing room

katyb
Aug. 10, 2010, 06:42 PM
I've towed with a Jeep Commander (5.7 liter w/ tow package), an Expedition (5.4 liter) and an F350 superduty crew cab longbed dually. All of them were great for my area (east TN). I can see that the suvs wouldn't be so great somewhere with steeper mountains and higher elevations. Honestly, my favorite was the Commander, but my husband really wanted a sports car, so I downgraded to the expedition, which is fine. The F350 is more powerful but WAY less manueverable, and there's not a big improvement in terms of braking distances. I tow a bumper pull, obviously, with two 15hh approximately 1,000 lb horses. Empty weight of my trailer is about 2,500 lbs. The jeep was tow rated to 7500 (or close, it's been a while), but I wouldn't have tried to tow more than about 5,000 live weight with it, and won't w/ the exped either.

Dalemma
Aug. 10, 2010, 07:25 PM
I cringe when I see or hear of people towing with less than a 3/4 ton..........this is one time where bigger is better......one ton diesel all the way.

Dalemma

SharonA
Aug. 10, 2010, 08:01 PM
FWIW, I like my Brenderup very much, and since I wasn't going to go buy a truck just to pull an American-designed trailer, it was an easy decision. As previously said, they're expensive to start with and the lesser-priced models don't have alot of storage space. But, if you're just going for day trips or you can store alot of stuff in your tow vehicle, I find that they can work very well. A pleasure to tow, a pleasure to stop (I joke that mine is like the cartoons of a rhinocerous in a ballerina tu-tu; the B'upster looks alittle awkward, but is very smooth when it comes to towing and stopping) cool and quiet back there for the horse, etc.

Concordia
Aug. 10, 2010, 08:07 PM
Here is the thing....it's not the PULLING you need to worry about...it's the StOPPING.... and those SUV's just aren't as safe if you need to stop quickly with a loaded trailer behind you.

As for Brenderups - those are designed for European roads, not American freeways.... they are designed for slower speeds.... I've pulled one a few times for someone else and it felt OK, but it was like towing a cardboard box...I really worried about how safe it really was.

BasqueMom
Aug. 10, 2010, 08:23 PM
We have an Expedition with the 5.4 engine rigged for towing as a backup vehicle. Our one haul with it was uneventual except for speed. Over 55 mph, the trailer began to sway. So anti-sway bars or whatever, would probably be called for.

Remind hubby it just ain't the pulling, it's the stopping power you got to think about.

Could be wrong but I think 120 inches is the minimum wheel base, might be
140 inches. Most crew cab short beds are 140 and most extended cabs long beds are 160. Our quad cab Dodge with long bed is also 160 or 158--it does
however have a shorter turning radius than the Ford F250 extended cab long
bed.

Having hauled with an F150 with a smaller engine before getting the F250 with the 7.3L diesel engine, never again would I pull with anything so underpowered! Hubby thought it would be fine for a two horse (he's from
Kansas) and we could barely get the trailer home empty from the dealer with it (living in Colorado) at the time. About 2 trips with the F150 and we were
out truck shopping. The F250 could pull the house as well as the horse trailer and not blink an eye. The Dodge 1500 does okay but doesn't match
up to the F250 diesel. All vehicles are 4x4's.

A Brono would be an accident waiting to happen! Even in Colorado, saw
lots of Expedition/Suburban combinations pulling 2 horse trailers at the shows.
The saddest thing was a 2-horse hitched to a Ford Ranger--the bumper was
practically dragging on the ground.

DMK
Aug. 10, 2010, 08:25 PM
As for Brenderups - those are designed for European roads, not American freeways.... they are designed for slower speeds....

I'm not a fan of brenderups, but you realize, this does beg the question: "You mean roads with slower speeds like the autobahns?"

And it's also worth pointing out "SUV" is a generic term that covers everything from light duty vehicles not suitable for towing all the way through 1/2 and 3/4 ton vehicles suitable for towing within their weight ranges. Quite frankly, a 3/4 ton suburban or excursion can safely tow just about anything that you can drop on that hitch, and most 1/2 and 3/4 ton SUVs are heavier than their pickup counterparts and really don't have an issue with braking.

Laurierace
Aug. 10, 2010, 10:31 PM
I am on my second Sequoia. I have probably logged close to 100k miles of towing between the two of them. In some unbelieveable conditions too. Most likely will get a third one when this one is over the hill.

suz
Aug. 10, 2010, 10:42 PM
so what about a real alternative? are there foreign makers or commercial brands which could do the job? i've seen those monster-looking jobs hauling huge rvs, maybe one of those would be a good choice to haul a horse trailer?
i'm looking too and having a hard time finding anything beyond the ford, dodge, or chevy options.

dkcbr
Aug. 11, 2010, 09:27 AM
I'm not a fan of brenderups, but you realize, this does beg the question: "You mean roads with slower speeds like the autobahns?"

And it's also worth pointing out "SUV" is a generic term that covers everything from light duty vehicles not suitable for towing all the way through 1/2 and 3/4 ton vehicles suitable for towing within their weight ranges. Quite frankly, a 3/4 ton suburban or excursion can safely tow just about anything that you can drop on that hitch, and most 1/2 and 3/4 ton SUVs are heavier than their pickup counterparts and really don't have an issue with braking.

True!

pintopiaffe
Aug. 11, 2010, 10:47 AM
I used a Dodge Dakota for 220k, much of it hauling, and also weekly heavy load farm work--4WD, capacity bed load etc.

I would go for a Durango in a HEARTBEAT if I could afford one. It would be my ideal tow vehicle for a 2 horse/not a lot of frills.

My S&S Custom Stock Combo horse trailer is XW/XT, 12' long with enough nose space to throw a curtain up for a dressing room... It is 2,250 empty.

The Dakota didn't even notice it, and I did NOT have the big 8 or hemi.

It stopped it fine as well, several times without the electric due to a fault in the trailer--but I don't *recommend* that. With the electric brakes working normally, it was a dream to tow and stop.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Aug. 11, 2010, 11:42 AM
Your husband and mine sound a lot alike (except that mine is driving a late model Ford Taurus, lol). But he doesn't get the need for a truck. So I've done a lot of research/thinking on this.

I've towed my friend's two horse Featherlite with tack room with her 99'ish Tahoe. I kept waiting to die (but had to get to the vet clinic asap). Every time a semi went by I was like "omg" you just feel the trailer sucking to it. This has anti-sway bars, btw!! I wouldn't even consider it without them!!

I would buy an SUV with a tow package, heighest weight rating I could find and go for the longest wheelbase and add a tranny cooler. I'm thinking 3/4 ton Suburban is what we will buy. I would put on a weight distribution hitch (on anything smaller) and sway bars. I would make sure the trailer has breaks on BOTH wheels. I would religiously check tire pressure. I would pull the shortest trailer possible. I would try not exceed 65 mps, even on the freeway. I'm looking at very light weight, tack compartment or no tack room trailers--see the other thread on this forum--we were just talking about them. Brenderups are very expensive. You have storage in the back of the SUV anyway.

I have had the breaks go out while towing, but luckily it was in the 3/4 ton truck. It still sucked, but was very doable. I'm pretty sure I would have died if the trailer breaks had gone out while usuing the Tahoe.

[Just to clarify--not anti-Brenderup. I just want a stock combo for airflow, where I have the option to safely conver to the box stall if needed]

CatOnLap
Aug. 11, 2010, 12:26 PM
Tell hubby there is no SUV worth pulling a trailer except a PORSCHE CAYENNE.

You can pull the titanic with that one...and it costs almost as much.

Then gently take him around to the used truck lot and show him the nice half or 3/4 ton you picked up.

FWIW, I have pulled 2 horse bumper pulls with everything from a 1967 Ford Country Squire station wagon through a 1990 Jeep Cherokee and a 2004 Lincln Navigator and any sort of pick up right up to the present dually F350.

I would not go back to the "something-less-than-a-truck" for stability and peace of mind issues.

mg
Aug. 11, 2010, 12:36 PM
I guess I'm just not fully understanding why you want an SUV instead of a truck? Is it because your husband wants to use it as a winter commuting vehicle, worried about MPGS, what exactly? I don't really see any advantage to having an SUV instead of a truck when you're not hauling. The 2002 F350 V10 superduty dually I haul with gets just 2 MPGs worse than the 2003 Ford Expedition (Eddie Bauer) V8 that I borrow from my mother occasionally when not hauling. Trucks are just fine for a commute as well. Do you just want to be able to take 8 people with you?

atlatl
Aug. 11, 2010, 03:40 PM
Tell hubby there is no SUV worth pulling a trailer except a PORSCHE CAYENNE.



And what are you doing hanging out with my husband!!!

Seriously, it took me a week to convince him that the Tahoe would do just fine. I pull a 2 horse Sundowner with dressing room with no problems and we pull a 22 foot Airstream again with no problems.

I'm surprised when people insist on a 3/4 ton or full ton truck to tow as the tonnage rating applies to the weight the truck can carry (that in the bed and the passenger compartment) and NOT the towing capacity. Granted, those trucks typically have bigger engines but you can get those as options on the "lighter" trucks and not have to ride on the stiffer suspension all the time. I agree with the previous post that wheelbase is important. The wheelbase is essentially the same on a 150, 250 or 350 if the cab configuration is the same.

atlatl
Aug. 11, 2010, 03:43 PM
I guess I'm just not fully understanding why you want an SUV instead of a truck? Is it because your husband wants to use it as a winter commuting vehicle, worried about MPGS, what exactly? I don't really see any advantage to having an SUV instead of a truck when you're not hauling.

I suspect the advantage for a winter commute is more weight over the rear wheel if it's a 2wd. Other advantages: it's easier to secure stuff in the back seat of an SUV than the bed of a pickup, you can take more than 2 people with you.

DMK
Aug. 11, 2010, 08:41 PM
I suspect the advantage for a winter commute is more weight over the rear wheel if it's a 2wd. Other advantages: it's easier to secure stuff in the back seat of an SUV than the bed of a pickup, you can take more than 2 people with you.

All this. SUVs have a time and place and I don't know if random internet strangers are qualified to judge what another person needs. Back in 2000, I traded in my
(4th?) F150 for an Expedition because it was the right choice for me at that time. Now I'm ready to get a gooseneck in the next few years and while an F150 and a half ton appropriate SUV are just fine for a 2 horse BP where serious mountains are not involved, you couldn't pay me to drop a GN on a 1/2 ton (and well, the SUV problem is obvious ;) ). Well, you could pay me... you'd have to pay me because of the wear and tear a GN does to a half ton! Different trucks for different jobs, but a 3/4 ton vehicle as the only choice for haling a horse trailer seems ... extreme and perhaps a bit dated in what the old "SUVs" and lighter duty trucks have evolved into since the 80's...

CatOnLap
Aug. 12, 2010, 12:16 AM
And what are you doing hanging out with my husband!!!

OMG! That was HIM???

He told me he owned the local volkswagon dealership!

He was hauling a 3 horse angle haul with that Cayenne too.

I almost fell over when he told me the sticker price.
Cheaper than a semi I guess...

atlatl
Aug. 12, 2010, 12:33 AM
What a relief; it wasn't him. He hasn't touched a VW since he installed the baja kit on my bug back in '81, but now I'm dating myself!:)

TrotTrotPumpkn
Aug. 12, 2010, 10:39 AM
I don't really see any advantage to having an SUV instead of a truck when you're not hauling.

Really? 1-2 adults in front, 1-2 kids in back & 2 dobermans crated in the rear + suitcases while driving in the snow/rain/sleet/heat. My dogs are babies about temp and have asked me not to put their crates in the bed of a truck ;) And even with a 4 door truck, my passengers don't want to share the back seat with the dogs.

My dad used to put a mattress in the bag of his Suburban on hunting/fishing trips and sleep in there. He said it was much nicer than a tent in the cold/rain.

I'm sure I will think of some more...

OP, if you are in MN now, I would go 4x4 and prepare for salt corrosion. Maybe the only place where an extra undercoat isn't a rip off from the dealer and constant washing in the winter of the undercarriage is a must. Bah.

Summit Springs Farm
Aug. 12, 2010, 11:23 AM
in a word Suburban, mt farrier just bought one that is 18 years old andis running great.
I use my suburban and have be very happt with it.
I did have a Sequoia and I like the suburban way better, but it was fine until I got the sub and realize it was better for towing.

Lieselotte
Aug. 12, 2010, 11:56 AM
I'm saving up money for this combination: VW Touareg and Brenderup Solo... Can't wait!

poltroon
Aug. 12, 2010, 01:15 PM
Most of the full size SUVs like an expedition, navigator, etc. are fully rated to tow everything an F150 tows (and built on the same frame), and you really do not need to be worried about starting, stopping, wear and tear on the vehicle - they are plenty durable in that area. They do have a slightly shorter wheelbase, BUT if you get a higher end one like the Eddie Bauer, it has load leveling suspension, and that compensates for a lot of sway.


Right. When you get to these SUVs, they are half-ton trucks, just with a different body. So if he was thinking that the SUV was going to be easier to park or get better mileage than a "truck", sorry, no.

mg
Aug. 12, 2010, 02:52 PM
Really? 1-2 adults in front, 1-2 kids in back & 2 dobermans crated in the rear + suitcases while driving in the snow/rain/sleet/heat. My dogs are babies about temp and have asked me not to put their crates in the bed of a truck ;) And even with a 4 door truck, my passengers don't want to share the back seat with the dogs.

My dad used to put a mattress in the bag of his Suburban on hunting/fishing trips and sleep in there. He said it was much nicer than a tent in the cold/rain.

I'm sure I will think of some more...

I was speaking to what I saw to be the OP's situation. Her husband wants this as his commuter vehicle in the winter. Maybe he brings a whole crew with him to work, but I doubt it. Also, the interior of a 95 Bronco (what he suggested) is a lot different from something like a Suburban or Expedition. It's a lot more like a truck with a cap. I understand the need in *general* for an SUV over a truck, I was just trying to clarify why the OP wanted an SUV instead of a truck (since she never stated in her post).

SuperSTB
Aug. 12, 2010, 03:11 PM
Hubby once asked if I could just use the Ford Escape to pull the loaded 2h w/ dressing room.

I spewed my coffee and dropped to the ground laughing.

Silly boy :lol:

I've seen plenty of suburbans, tahoes, durangos, even blazers and expeditions towing 2 horse trailers. Heck my sister went cross country in a lincoln AVIATOR w/ a loaded 2H (scaaaaaaaaary). They are all capable but... so many additional factors play into whether it's a good idea.

such as:
Additional wear and tear.
Driver capability.
How behaved the horse(s) is.
Condition and weight of trailer.
Road conditions/ terrain.
Towing accessories.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Aug. 12, 2010, 03:19 PM
I was speaking to what I saw to be the OP's situation. Her husband wants this as his commuter vehicle in the winter. Maybe he brings a whole crew with him to work, but I doubt it. Also, the interior of a 95 Bronco (what he suggested) is a lot different from something like a Suburban or Expedition. It's a lot more like a truck with a cap. I understand the need in *general* for an SUV over a truck, I was just trying to clarify why the OP wanted an SUV instead of a truck (since she never stated in her post).

I forgot about the Bronco part--I'm with you. Maybe the op will clarify?

OP, I would never tow with a Bronco, btw.

Sithly
Aug. 12, 2010, 04:07 PM
Where's 2Bees? He's late for his regularly scheduled rant. :lol:



If you're asking what's *possible*, I have seen Pony Club moms hauling with Dodge Durango's and even Dakota or Ranger sized trucks. I would not feel safe in such a rig.

The other day, I saw a three horse steel trailer hooked up to a Durango in a bar parking lot. :eek: Trailer was empty, so I was hoping they were just transporting it somewhere and were not planning to actually haul horses with that rig. Scary.

enjoytheride
Aug. 12, 2010, 05:06 PM
Unfortunatly on this BB you will not get an answer besides "F 750 and nothing smaller or you will die a horrific horrible horrifying death.

I have seen all manner of SUVs towing smaller BP trailers at every single show I go to, I guess someone needs to tell them that they're an accident waiting to happen.

Someone should also write Brender Up and tell them they're death on wheels.

There are plenty of non truck vehicles out there that can do the job depending on what your needs are and what kind of trailer your own. Send your hubby to horsetrailerworld.com and have him read up, if he's a car guy he'll understand all the guy specs and research and will probably have no issues making a good decision.

DMK
Aug. 12, 2010, 09:06 PM
They are all capable but... so many additional factors play into whether it's a good idea.

such as:
Additional wear and tear.
Driver capability.
How behaved the horse(s) is.
Condition and weight of trailer.
Road conditions/ terrain.
Towing accessories.

LOL, those factors come into play as soon as you decide to hitch a box with wheels to a box with an engine and put the World's Stupidest Large Animal (WSLA) in said box and use the two boxes to take WSLA from Point A to Point B. After that, it's just semantics.

2bee
Aug. 13, 2010, 12:05 AM
Where's 2Bees? He's late for his regularly scheduled rant. :lol:




He's been at work and doesn't have time to get drawn into any silly shit.

True, the dumbass comments about wheelbase and stopping have appeared.........but there has also been quite a few (for this forum) posts from people who aren't scared to death to use something other than a 3/4 ton. ;)

Carry on.

wildlifer
Aug. 13, 2010, 10:14 AM
Wheelbase comments are not dumb -- it does indeed play a factor. Physics is not all about direct relationships and a few inches can make a LOT of difference in handling capability and safety. You can rant all you want, but it doesn't make things true that are not, in fact, true at all.

At any rate, the OP's questions was can you haul with an SUV. Yes, you can. But I would not do it with anything larger than a basic two horse trailer and anything smaller than a full size SUV (Suburban, Expedition, Excursion). The problem you hit when you add dressing rooms, etc, extending the length is that you get trailer sway which is more than the smaller trucks and even 1/2 ton pickups can often control. I've unfortunately involuntarily tested this one!

But, to repeat, if you are hauling infrequently, over flat terrain, I'd have no problem putting a horse or two in a little bumper pull behind, say, a Suburban or somesuch. You can go the Brenderup route too, although I personally don't like them (yes, I have tried them) and would never buy one. But ymmv and if you have cash to throw around, it's an option.

Trakehner
Aug. 13, 2010, 12:40 PM
OK...more from the Dark Side.

I towed all over the East Coast with....a 1988 Ford Bronco (5 liter engine, C6 3-speed transmission). It worked just fine. Wasn't squirrely going down the road, didn't bottom out and was a nice vehicle to drive except for the 9 miles a gallon gas usage...that kinda' hurt. Of course, on a good day it got 13 mpg.

I towed a Featherlite aluminum two horse (no dressing room) extra-wide/extra-tall custom trailer that later became available as a "warmblood" trailer. I frequently towed two horses, and one of those an 18.2 hand Shire mare.

I used a Reese equalizing hitch with anti-sway set-up.

I towed with this vehicle until it hit 100,000 miles and I started to worry about the transmission at that point.

At horse shows in the old days, you'd see more full-sized station wagons pulling trailers than trucks, and also big sedans hauling two-horse steel trailers...we survived. Lots better brakes and suspensions now, better brake controllers and hitches available. People have gone a bit nuts with paranoia about trailering.

I now tow with a Dodge I ton dually diesel. Is it better for towing? You bet! Better mileage? You bet! Can it tow more weight safely? You bet! But I miss the Bronco as a 2-horse platform...You Bet!

Can't stand Brenderups...Euro crap on a cracker trailers no matter what their proponents say...I much prefer a Rice trailer for lightweight stuff.

DMK
Aug. 13, 2010, 01:45 PM
At horse shows in the old days, you'd see more full-sized station wagons pulling trailers than trucks, and also big sedans hauling two-horse steel trailers...we survived. Lots better brakes and suspensions now, better brake controllers and hitches available. People have gone a bit nuts with paranoia about trailering.

Yes, with some qualifiers - those old station wagons were monsters with some seriously heavy chassis as a base for the rest of the vehicle - those cars weighed a lot, and they had a lot of engine on them (says the person who used to joke that her '73 Buick Gran Sport got 9 gallons to the mile ... going downhill. With the engine cut off. And a tailwind).

So it sort of goes both ways - yes, the larger SUVs built on truck chassis are fine for towing within their limits, BUT the lighter SUVs do not take advantage of the improvements/technology in suspension and they have sacrificed that heavy chassis and big powerful engine for a lighter, more fuel efficient and more comfortable vehicle.

2bee
Aug. 14, 2010, 01:35 AM
Wheelbase comments are not dumb -- it does indeed play a factor. Physics is not all about direct relationships and a few inches can make a LOT of difference in handling capability and safety. You can rant all you want, but it doesn't make things true that are not, in fact, true at all.

At any rate, the OP's questions was can you haul with an SUV. Yes, you can. But I would not do it with anything larger than a basic two horse trailer and anything smaller than a full size SUV (Suburban, Expedition, Excursion). The problem you hit when you add dressing rooms, etc, extending the length is that you get trailer sway which is more than the smaller trucks and even 1/2 ton pickups can often control. I've unfortunately involuntarily tested this one!

But, to repeat, if you are hauling infrequently, over flat terrain, I'd have no problem putting a horse or two in a little bumper pull behind, say, a Suburban or somesuch. You can go the Brenderup route too, although I personally don't like them (yes, I have tried them) and would never buy one. But ymmv and if you have cash to throw around, it's an option.

You have no clue about what causes/controls sway, the same way you over-rate wheelbase.....but keep on with your profound recommendations, I'm sure someone will listen. :rolleyes:

tabula rashah
Aug. 14, 2010, 07:57 AM
Unfortunatly on this BB you will not get an answer besides "F 750 and nothing smaller or you will die a horrific horrible horrifying death.

I have seen all manner of SUVs towing smaller BP trailers at every single show I go to, I guess someone needs to tell them that they're an accident waiting to happen.

Someone should also write Brender Up and tell them they're death on wheels.

There are plenty of non truck vehicles out there that can do the job depending on what your needs are and what kind of trailer your own. Send your hubby to horsetrailerworld.com and have him read up, if he's a car guy he'll understand all the guy specs and research and will probably have no issues making a good decision.


Ah a refreshing voice of reason

mvp
Aug. 14, 2010, 08:42 AM
This may or may not suffice as a good suggestion. But I test drove one and learned that we all need power back windows in trucks.

These are trucks but come in crew cabs. They are comfortable and have smart amenities for people. They are presently cheap for new vehicles as Nissan only started bullding them in 2004 and probably wants to get a bunch out there on the road.

A friend who hauls a big draft, his equipment and such in a 2H dressing room bumper pull likes hers. I think the wheel base is too short, but she is (has always been) about a weight distribution hitch and sway bars. The woman is happy with 1/2 trucks and this configuration. She hasn't used long enough to tell me what I'd like to know about the durability of the engine and transmission. Nissan doesn't know, either.

The Nissan's mpg isn't good-- 12 city, 17 highway. I'm not sure why Nissan wants to get into the truck market with a little one that does have power but gets crap milage in comparison to the established American competition.

But I offer this "non-truck" alternative because these are cheap and comfortable. Did you get the part about the power back window that we didn't know we *needed*?

poltroon
Aug. 14, 2010, 06:11 PM
This may or may not suffice as a good suggestion. But I test drove one and learned that we all need power back windows in trucks.

These are trucks but come in crew cabs. They are comfortable and have smart amenities for people. They are presently cheap for new vehicles as Nissan only started bullding them in 2004 and probably wants to get a bunch out there on the road.

A friend who hauls a big draft, his equipment and such in a 2H dressing room bumper pull likes hers. I think the wheel base is too short, but she is (has always been) about a weight distribution hitch and sway bars. The woman is happy with 1/2 trucks and this configuration. She hasn't used long enough to tell me what I'd like to know about the durability of the engine and transmission. Nissan doesn't know, either.

The Nissan's mpg isn't good-- 12 city, 17 highway. I'm not sure why Nissan wants to get into the truck market with a little one that does have power but gets crap milage in comparison to the established American competition.

But I offer this "non-truck" alternative because these are cheap and comfortable. Did you get the part about the power back window that we didn't know we *needed*?

Your post confuses me because I don't know anyone who would say the Nissan Titan is not a truck. It's a 1/2 ton + in terms of its towing and other capabilities.

And, you can get a crew cab on any full size truck. I have one and I feel a lot better about the gas mileage when it has 4-6 people in it.

mvp
Aug. 14, 2010, 08:45 PM
Your post confuses me because I don't know anyone who would say the Nissan Titan is not a truck. It's a 1/2 ton + in terms of its towing and other capabilities.

And, you can get a crew cab on any full size truck. I have one and I feel a lot better about the gas mileage when it has 4-6 people in it.

Yeah, I was not clear. What I meant was that it was not quite a truck in terms of it's thoughtful human features.

Back power window (which I'm still not over). Cool folding seats to make a laptop table. Stuff like that.

I have also always driven older, plainer, bigger trucks so I'm not used to all of the features the rest of you know about.

Wee Dee Trrr
Aug. 15, 2010, 10:09 PM
I'm a silly person who owns a horse and a trailer... but no truck. My trailer is 2,250 lbs, 10 ft. long and 7 ft tall. My horse is 15.3 TB. I live in Indiana, where hills are a mystery. When hauling locally (no highways) I borrow my boyfriend's Chevy v6 1500. When going longer distances I borrow my brother's GMC Yukon v8. They both do fine, although the chevy is less capable. I DO NOT haul 2 horses with the chevy. EVER. The yukon, on the other hand does great... I have hauled a fully packed 2 horse with 2 horses inside plus all gear for 2 people for an overnight event with it to KY and back. Plus it's PLUSH. Nice car, for sure.

Now, if I could go buy my tow vehicle right now... I would't get either. (I'd get a GMC Sierra) But it is what I have available, so I will cheerfully work with it and thank the boys who graciously le me borrow their cars. :D

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Aug. 16, 2010, 04:53 PM
I'm not a fan of brenderups, but you realize, this does beg the question: "You mean roads with slower speeds like the autobahns?"


The Autobahn is one of the safest "slow" driving roads I've ever driven on. "Slower traffic keep right" MEANS SLOWER TRAFFIC KEEPS RIGHT. You would never tow a horse trailer anywhere near the left lane on the Autobahn. And people will respectfully pass you on the left side. It is not unusual to see vehicles with top speeds of 50-60 km/h driving in the right lane on the Autobahn. And, FWIW, the average speed limit on open parts is about 80mph. In/around cities, you're looking at more like 45-50mph. Speed limit free zones are not as big or plentiful as many would imagine.