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IFG
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:52 PM
Today, my neighbor told me that she saw two people in my paddock at about two in the morning and a horse trailer parked on the road next to the paddock.

Paddock is located right next to the road, and horse is in/out of his barn 24/7/. Paddock is sand, about 1/4 acre. I have a cable lock on the front gate that people can squeeze through, but a horse cannot. I have a feeling, without that lock, my horse would not be around this morning.

I called the police, and they will keep an eye on the property. I bought a u-type bike lock to put on the gate so that people can no longer squeeze through. I bought locks for all of the other gates. I have a spot on the barn. I may add one to the road area. My bedroom looks out on the paddock, and I wake up when the spot goes on, but I had the shade drawn last night. I'll keep it open in the future.

Any other good ideas. I have heard the horror stories of stealing horses to sell for meat. Murphy is only 15.2 and a bit, but weighs in at 1000 pounds.

I am freaked.

Badger
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:56 PM
Ask you neighbor to call you if she ever sees anything like that again.

wireweiners
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:57 PM
Do you have a dog? A large dog can be a big deterrent to folks that are up to no good. I have a pit bull, a largish mutt and a catahoula. All three are really sweet but look intimidating.

skip916
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:01 PM
omg so scary.

why didn't neighbor CALL you?

IFG
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:04 PM
I told neighbor to call in the future. It was 2 am, and she felt funny about waking me up. Of course, they are going out of town for a week now.

Dog is a Standard Poodle, and cannot be trusted loose because of the road. He will defend the house, but I don't trust him and the horse together.

You don't think that these things happen in semi-suburban MA, but the police officer took it very seriously.

twofatponies
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:05 PM
omg so scary.

why didn't neighbor CALL you?

Tell neighbor to call police and you next time!

Don't leave a halter on the horse.

If you don't use the gate frequently, throw some crap in front of it to make it hard to open quietly - like a pile of poles and sheet metal or some metal trash cans full of rocks.

Good luck!

IFG
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:08 PM
Horse never has halter on. Good idea about blockading the gate.

Simbalism
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:08 PM
Yikes that would freak me out as well. For a small paddock, I am wondering if there is anyway you can rig some kind of alarm system?

Bluey
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:17 PM
Can you get some kind of driveway announcer that will beep any time someone is close to your driveway?

If you have some neighbors with horses, call them and warn them to be alert, they too are possible targets.:eek:

One of our neighbors called around when someone broke into his tackroom and took all his saddles.:(

chance2jump
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:30 PM
Can you attach surveillance cameras to the area? For instance, a low cost security camera system or camera hunters use that are triggered with motion? If so, make sure to post "smile, you're on camera" signs.

Tiffani B
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:34 PM
Even just the "security camera" signs alone might be a deterrant.

In addition to the suggestions offered, I would electrify the fence in such a way that the gate cannot be opened without turning off the power. Heck, I'd electrify the entire gate, not just a strand on top of it!

And I'd install motion lights by every possible entrance to the property and paddock.

IFG
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:44 PM
Good suggestions. I am going shopping for battery operated motion detector lights. I have 5' no climb with electric on top, so the only way in and out is the gates. Ugh...

I will look into the driveway warning. Problem is the paddock fronts the road for about 100'. I see tire tracks past the paddock on the road, away from the house.

suz
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:48 PM
HOLYSH!T!!!! was it a white ford truck? last year a truck with that description was seen with stolen trailers in our area and in pa.
this is so scary--my barn is next to the road too, and i have a double fenced
barnyard and security light so i can see the horses anytime from my bedroom window.
i'd also add a lot of debris to the gate area, leave halters off, and get a yard dog for sure.
i'm stunned this is happening so close to me.

IFG
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:56 PM
Neighbor could not see the truck in detail because it was parked further down the road out of range of the spot.

My trailer is parked in a way to be easily hitched close to the road. Need to move that too.

Diamondindykin
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:58 PM
Can you move your horse for a week or so? If not I would block the gate as suggested. They can cut through wire if your fencing is as such so be aware of that too. Honestly if I were you I would camp out by the barn for a few nights with a gun. If they are wanting to steal him they will give up after a few days.

I had a friend a few years ago who had her horse stolen and it was an absolute nightmare!!! Unbelievably she found the mare two years later safe and sound but it usually doesn't work out that way.

PRS
Aug. 6, 2010, 04:12 PM
Holy Crap!!! Horse thieves are almost as low as a child molesters in my book. There are motion activated alarms and cameras...if I were you I'd be looking into them. I'd be electrifing every part of the fence and gate so that anyone wanting to come in uninvited would get a nasty surprise and I'd get a hitch lock for my trailer and move it to a less accessible spot on the property. Locks and chains and a big ugly, loud yard dog are your friends.

JSwan
Aug. 6, 2010, 05:10 PM
The horrified horse owner part of me suggest that you sit outside with a shotgun. But of course, responsible grown ups don't make such suggestions so forget I said anything.

The responsible grown up in me wonders if a driveway alarm might work for you. You can get them on-line.

You may want to consult a company like ADT.

Signage, varying your routine, (they might be watching your place and noting your comings and goings) blocking access to the gate (not to your home in case an ambulance or fire truck needs to get in), advising neighbors to be on the lookout and to call 911 if they see anything suspicious, and to jot down descriptions and tag numbers.

Also, think about a permanent ID on your horse. Perhaps consult your vet on branding, microchips, anything that might identify your horse if the worst happens (God forbid)

Trailer hitch lock, padlocks on gates, you can get solar powered motion detector lights and place them anywhere you want.

Good luck.

IFG
Aug. 6, 2010, 05:25 PM
Horse is heavy, so he has the 24/7 in/out routine. Also 18 years old and a retired OTTB, so permanently tattooed. I will look into the driveway alarm. I still cannot believe that I need to deal with this in my neck of the woods.

I really appreciate the suggestions. We are moving our trailer to block on gate so that it cannot open and lots of heavy trash cans to block another. The road gates will be sealed with Kryptonite locks. Not to mention my bedroom window is about 100 feet away.

And JSwan. For the first time in our lives (ok the second after my daughters started to date), my husband and I are wishing that we had a shotgun.

JSwan
Aug. 6, 2010, 05:32 PM
It's a sign of the times, IFG. :no:

msj
Aug. 6, 2010, 05:58 PM
If your house and barn are not too far apart, something easy, inexpensive and quick is to get an intercom system. My barn is ~200' from the house and I have a monitor in the barn and 4 receivers in the house in the rooms I frequent the most.

Baby monitors work as well.

Do be careful though blocking that gate if that is the ONLY way, other than to go into the stall/barn, to get into and out of that paddock. Think about the distinct possibility of fire in the barn. The only way you could get your horse out is thru a gate that's blocked! :eek: Not good. If you want to block it, just use a few rocks or rails but forget parking the horse trailer there.

Speaking of horse trailer, put a lock on the hitch so no one can back up to it and pull away.

wildlifer
Aug. 6, 2010, 06:00 PM
Another thing to keep in mind is that if your fences are wire, they can and will cut through them VERY quickly. Sadly, NC has spent plenty of time leading the nation in horse theft and I used to school at a farm near Charlotte that was often haunted by kill trailers eyeing the heavy horses pastured away from the barn. Cameras are great, patrols are great. Vary your schedule as well. Police where I was arrested several folks and seized a laptop containing lists of farms up and down the E Coast, schedules, car makes and models that were present at what times, lists of horses, etc, very scary stuff. Definitely be vigilant and do not be shy about it.

IFG
Aug. 6, 2010, 06:40 PM
Locks on gates, and the police officer who took my report was nice enough to stop by and check in. He alerted all of the officers on duty so they will also keep an eye out.

On a good note, our street is frequently traveled so it would be hard to go unnoticed.

joiedevie99
Aug. 6, 2010, 08:09 PM
Battery operated motion sensor light on all gates. Large pile of noisy items in front of gate. Camera/alarm warning signs even if you don't have one. Take halter off horse and keep it out of sight. Mount on of those cheap laser beam alarms on the outside of the posts that hold up your gate- horse should never set it off if its on the outside, but a person leaning over to pet the horse or trying to open the gate would break the beam and trip the alarm.

Jaegermonster
Aug. 6, 2010, 11:07 PM
FYI, your horse cannot be traced back to you through his JC lip tattoo, assuming it's even still legible at his age. I second the microchip suggestion.

I have several solar powered motion lights at my place and they work really well

2boys
Aug. 7, 2010, 12:00 AM
Wow. This is my neck of the woods, and I am shocked to see that this is happening. I don't have any additional tips... These are great ideas. Good luck!

sadlmakr
Aug. 7, 2010, 12:48 AM
There is a set up that has a UV light beam that if they walk through it it sets off an alarm. Motion sensors work too.
I would not get complacent about this. They were thwarted once but they might try again.
It is scarey to think of it.
My prayers are with you about this.
Kindest regards, sadlmakr

jetsmom
Aug. 7, 2010, 01:33 AM
You can always park a vehicle in front of your gate, so no one could lead a horse in or out of it, yet you could move it in an emergency.

IFG
Aug. 7, 2010, 07:45 AM
Well horse is fine this AM. I have a niece who works for security so I will look into the laser beam detector. We repositioned the sensor light so that it targets the road gate. It is obnoxiously bright. I will get a battery ones for the other two gates that could be used. I have two other gates that go to the garden/manure are, but because of a rock berm, no where else.

Thanks all for your suggestions.

fivehorses
Aug. 7, 2010, 09:15 AM
I would take this seriously, I had read on equinesite some concerns about a white truck and trailer scoping out farms in Mass and RI.

Like wildlifer said, if you have wire or wood, the thieves will cut that and lead the horse through it. Also, I am dismayed at the fact these thieves targeted places...yuck.

Anyone have good leads on security sources for the solar and laser lights or high pitch alarms...where does one go to buy those things?
I probably should be getting alarms for the gates.

I guess this is one of those times, I am glad to have neighbors who live next to each gate! and know my horses would not be loaded thru those gates, especially at night. Alarms would be wonderful.

OP, take care, and do everything possible, They most likely will be back if they think this is an easy mark. Plus, alert your neighbors to call the police and you if anything is suspicious, and also tell them what is going on, and that if you ever load your horses, you will notify them first, so that they don't wonder if its you. Good luck.

Thomas_1
Aug. 7, 2010, 09:51 AM
Get a good heavy chain and padlock on your gates and wrap it round so it rattles and clatters when you take it off. I use combination locks to save myself having to mess about with keys.

Put electric fencing up and switched on inside the gate.

Put a sign on the gate saying you've got video surveillance and an alarm system. Put signs up saying "beware, electric fencing"

If it's practical then get a sensor flood light rigged up so if someone approaches it switches on. The ones I have also are linked to an alarm and video camera in the house but you have to have electricity supply and be the right distance away from the sensors etc for those to work and be viable.

If it's not a gate you regularly use then put a great big rock that you'd need a tractor to move in front of it and to stop it being opened.

Remember, you can get signs up as a deterrent though without actually having a system to back it up.

CatOnLap
Aug. 7, 2010, 12:01 PM
There are a host of solar powered security lights and sirens available nowadays. That is scarey. I bring my horses in at night, but more to protect my neighbours' gardens in case they should break out. My horse facilities do not front any roads, thankfully.

We've had 2 attempted burglaries in the last couple of months. Both times the hapless burglars stole a bike out of our garage or garden shed in the middle of the afternoon, while the SO was home ( but was practicing his drums). Both times they abandoned the bike, with its two flat tires, not far from the house. Now our dog is tied in front of the house during the day and has access to both the shed and the garage...and any opportunistic thieves.

tallyho392
Aug. 7, 2010, 12:22 PM
man, i would booby-trap the place like crazy!

string line of tin cans to get feet tangled in..
how about those motion sensor sprinklers, used to keep birds away.......would at least make would-be thieves yell

trigger rig paint ball guns?

i would think that siren alams would also be good......loud shrieking ones......

makes me SO MAD that there are folks like this...

since your horse has to stay out because of health reasons, is there a way to keep him in JUST a smaller paddock only at night?,,,that way, it would be easier to rig a defense for a smaller area.......

fivehorses
Aug. 7, 2010, 04:09 PM
in case you didn't see this thread....
http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=268148

goeslikestink
Aug. 7, 2010, 05:06 PM
Today, my neighbor told me that she saw two people in my paddock at about two in the morning and a horse trailer parked on the road next to the paddock.

Paddock is located right next to the road, and horse is in/out of his barn 24/7/. Paddock is sand, about 1/4 acre. I have a cable lock on the front gate that people can squeeze through, but a horse cannot. I have a feeling, without that lock, my horse would not be around this morning.

I called the police, and they will keep an eye on the property. I bought a u-type bike lock to put on the gate so that people can no longer squeeze through. I bought locks for all of the other gates. I have a spot on the barn. I may add one to the road area. My bedroom looks out on the paddock, and I wake up when the spot goes on, but I had the shade drawn last night. I'll keep it open in the future.

Any other good ideas. I have heard the horror stories of stealing horses to sell for meat. Murphy is only 15.2 and a bit, but weighs in at 1000 pounds.

I am freaked.

1st bang the end of your gate posts flat so that they cant lift it of it hinges
2nd do a chain unsited on the hinged side of gate and wrap it around the post




3rd do what i did and i know people hate bare wire as my gates are also on the road, and twist it in and out of the gate it self and continiue though to the gap if possible on to your fence line and then hide the ends
i did thorught bars and up andover the top so there no way people can climb over or through dont worry about horsey as theyget used to it

4th - on the gate catch see if it has a hole on the opening side if not find a welder and attach anoter one that has and attached to catch the 2nd bar down - then put a massive lock on that one

third bare wire top of fence line - add cctv if yuo dont live there its just as easy with a pc you an buy them if not located in the same place as your horse if you are can still add cctv

add this type of lock in the hole -- mentioned as cant uundo with bulk cutters so easily
http://www.masterlocks.com//CatalogImages/17-116-Category_Primary_Image.jpeg

you want to look at commerical building pad locks

http://www.masterlocks.com//CatalogImages/48-1039-Category_Primary_Image.jpeg

Claddagh
Aug. 7, 2010, 07:04 PM
Boy, what a scary situation to be in! But lucky for you that your good neighbor saw what was going on!

I *second* what goeslikestink said about also putting a chain and lock around the post on the hinge side of your gates. It is as easy as can be to just lift the gate off of the hanging hinges and then open the gate from the hinge side. I never thought of that when we put chains and locks on our gates - my farrier pointed that out to me. The gates just pop right off those hanging hinges!

Best of luck. Isn't is a shame that we have to go through such measures just to protect ourselves from the *evil out there*?

JohnDeere
Aug. 7, 2010, 07:47 PM
man, i would booby-trap the place like crazy!

string line of tin cans to get feet tangled in..
how about those motion sensor sprinklers, used to keep birds away.......would at least make would-be thieves yell

trigger rig paint ball guns?

i would think that siren alams would also be good......loud shrieking ones......

makes me SO MAD that there are folks like this...

since your horse has to stay out because of health reasons, is there a way to keep him in JUST a smaller paddock only at night?,,,that way, it would be easier to rig a defense for a smaller area.......

Have you watch Home Alone lately? :lol::lol::lol:

amastrike
Aug. 7, 2010, 07:56 PM
I agree with the suggestion of parking a vehicle in front of the gate.

Do you feed hay or anything in the paddock? If so, be sure to put it as far away from the road as possible. Encourage the horse to stay away from the gate and the road.

Guin
Aug. 7, 2010, 08:01 PM
If there's a fire emergency you can just drive a truck through the fence. I think blocking the gate with the trailer is an excellent idea.

Equibrit
Aug. 7, 2010, 08:09 PM
I make it a point not to have any gates that can be accessed from the outside perimeter of my property. It may be a good idea to move the gate closer to home.

Foxtrot's
Aug. 7, 2010, 08:23 PM
Have the police had any other horse thefts in the area?

IFG
Aug. 8, 2010, 11:55 AM
Thanks so much all for your help. I have implemented most, and I am working to implement the rest. When I first heard of cutting the fence, I was really upset, until I realized that when we excavated, we put all of the boulders that came out of the ground on the perimeter. We did it more to keep the horse in if he broke the fence, but I am really lucky in that, with the exception of one section, that is right next to the front gate, even if someone cuts the wire, they cannot get the horse past the boulders (on front and three sides of the paddocks) and the swamp and large debris berm in the rear. So efforts focus on the gates and the one section of fence next to the front gate. Those are easy to light, chain, and alarm. I remain vigilant. And all ideas are welcome.

BTW, I have put the word out to other horse folks in the area.

fivehorses
Aug. 8, 2010, 12:44 PM
good for you...I thought if you live in New england, its not just fence but also our stone walls, etc that are also fences. I am glad you did that with the rocks that you excavated.

I don't know who this is that haunts the mass horse farms looking to 'steal' horses, but wish they'd catch them.
I also have baby monitors out in my barn, and you'd be amazed what else they pick up. I hear the police sirens, animal sounds, etc. So, if you had an electric outlet that was indoors, but near a doorway or window, you might also 'hear' unusual noises that would alert you.
Good luck.

Tiki
Aug. 8, 2010, 05:13 PM
I *second* what goeslikestink said about also putting a chain and lock around the post on the hinge side of your gates. It is as easy as can be to just lift the gate off of the hanging hinges and then open the gate from the hinge side. You should NEVER use both hinge pins as hanging hinges. It is just as easy for the horses to lift the gate off the hinges as it is for people. Maybe even easier as they are bigger and stronger. I ALWAYS put the bottom hinge pin facing up and the top hinge pin facing down. Put the gate on the bottom hinge pin and then slide the top hinge up onto the top hinge pin and tighten both down very well. Use case hardened carriage bolts. It is VERY difficult to get very well tightened, case hardened carriage bolts off a gate without the proper tools and a lot of time!! Then, lock the gate to the post with a heavy chain on the other side.

Bluey
Aug. 8, 2010, 05:59 PM
We always put both pins up, because so it is much harder to hit the gate with a vehicle and break it loose, as it is with one pin up and one down.
If a horse or cow pushes another one into a gate with the top pin down and the bottom up, the gate may bow enough to come clear off the henges, we have seen that happen.
If both pins are up, then under pressure, the bottom one may come off, but the gate will still be held somewhat in place by the top one.
A chain in the middle tends to help keep the gate from bowing too much under pressure.

We put both pins up, then wire the top henge down, so cattle or horses can't lift it, it doesn't take much to keep them from it.
We chain the gate on both ends, so people can't lift it after cutting that wire.

The chains are locked with combination locks, so you don't have to hunt for a key and anyone may call you in an emergency and get the number.
That number is also on file at the sheriff's office, that handles the EMT and fire services.

With today's portable power tools, anyone can cut a chain or lock or gate easily and let themselves in anyway.:(

At least we may keep some from even trying to get in right here, as long as they can get in easier somewhere else.:yes:

Each one has different ways of doing things and I expect they are just as much or little a deterrent as the one trying to get in wants to try to do so.

katie+tru
Aug. 8, 2010, 08:01 PM
Why not do something really evil like put hot wire on the outside of the fence. Or stake some up a foot or two away. They can't cut the fence if they can't even touch it. >:)

Christa P
Aug. 8, 2010, 08:12 PM
Why not do something really evil like put hot wire on the outside of the fence. Or stake some up a foot or two away. They can't cut the fence if they can't even touch it. >:)

Insulated wire cutters would take care of this, and most wire cutters come with a rubber grip on the handle for this reason. Once the wire is cut it is no longer hot.

Christa

retreadeventer
Aug. 8, 2010, 08:58 PM
I think it is important to drive your road and see if there are any convenience stores or retail establishments at the end, or across from an intersection, that might have surveillance video. Check with them about the night in question fairly quickly before the tapes re-use and erase. You might be able to find the vehicle.
Some intersections have traffic cams that also record vehicles. A vehicle you describe would have gone thru one of those SOME place near your home, I bet. Just have to sort of scope around and find the right one. I do accident scene investigation and I know there are traffic cams all over the place and lots of businesses with cameras. McDonalds...drugstores...etc. most trained on the egress/entrances of parking lots to record vehicles. Most pawn shops. Etc.

Take a picture of your truck and trailer and your horse, (oh and photo that lip tattoo, also) and put the pictures on a flyer with your name and contact info, and make copies -- and go to every neighbor on your road with it in your hand, and tell them personally -- this is MY horse and my trailer. If you ever see MY horse in some other trailer he is being stolen, call 911 then call me.

Are there any other horses in properties on your road? Have they seen the same trailer and truck? Chances are they scoped out your horse and property during the day and came back at night -- this would be the second time then, they were at your place.

Sorry I know that doesn't make you feel very secure! But chances are you may not be alone, it's possible they scoped another adjacent property, too.

Just my thoughts. Hope it helps.

hntrjmprpro45
Aug. 9, 2010, 11:43 AM
I know you said you can't let your dog loose outside but could you possibly put a dog pen near the horse? Our dogs aren't allowed to wonder loose without us being around (we also have a busy road next to our property) but our dogs pen is close enough to our front entrance that ANYONE coming on to our property causes the dogs to bark. Barking dogs can be a big deterrent to thieves as well as to unwanted wildlife. Security cameras and/or motion sensored lights are also good ideas.

SonnysMom
Aug. 9, 2010, 01:47 PM
In this economy they might have been looking to drop off an unwanted horse instead of steal yours.

Summit Springs Farm
Aug. 12, 2010, 11:56 AM
I know with all you're dealing with might not want to but please take pictures I think we'll all love to see what you've done.
I have always worried about horse thief, we put alot into our animals and we would be devastated if tey were stolen.

If its possible we do not even leave ours at shows over night because of this. And the ones we do all the braider have my cell phone number if anything looks funny.

Chief2
Aug. 13, 2010, 03:39 PM
This may not help in the immediate future, but given the climate out there, why not get the gun permit applications in so you can legally carry a gun in Mass, and start taking the NRA gun course? You may never actually need to use the gun, but better to be safe than sorry, and this would get you on the road to quality instruction and legal gun ownership.

I don't know if you need a permit up there to own and use a pellet gun. That would at least be a deterrent to folks with stealing on their minds.

Curiously
Aug. 15, 2010, 06:52 PM
Sadly, NC has spent plenty of time leading the nation in horse theft and I used to school at a farm near Charlotte that was often haunted by kill trailers eyeing the heavy horses pastured away from the barn. Cameras are great, patrols are great. Vary your schedule as well. Police where I was arrested several folks and seized a laptop containing lists of farms up and down the E Coast, schedules, car makes and models that were present at what times, lists of horses, etc, very scary stuff. Definitely be vigilant and do not be shy about it.

WOW, that's really scary!!!!!!!! :eek::eek:

wildlifer
Aug. 15, 2010, 07:10 PM
Yes, that particular bust majorly freaked me out. I did not own a horse at the time, or else I might have just had a heart attack and died of sheer paranoia.

My2cents
Aug. 15, 2010, 07:21 PM
Lights are a good deterrent but so is sound. I have an old christmas wreath made out of jingle bells wired on to my main gate. NOTHING gets in or out without making a lot of noise. Maybe you could make a string of jingle bells and attach them to the road side of the paddock. No one would be looking for such a thing and you can make sure that at the first jingle you'd be awake and ready for action.

LearnToFly
Aug. 15, 2010, 11:44 PM
you know, it might be time to rescue a shelter dog that can stay outside...

scrtwh
Aug. 16, 2010, 02:13 PM
Just be aware that motion sensors and alarms are set off by coons, possums, owls, etc ... you may not get any sleep.

I would be looking into a guardian dog.

So bloody scary.

IFG
Aug. 16, 2010, 09:02 PM
You're not joking about the spots waking you up all night. Horsie goes in and out of his stall all night. I am getting rings under my eyes. Nothing suspicious since the original post, and I feel much better with all of the locks. Given our small piece of land (paddock is 1/4 acre), I cannot see keeping an LGD.

Thanks all for your great ideas and good wishes.

elysian*fields*farm
Aug. 17, 2010, 02:15 PM
you know, it might be time to rescue a shelter dog that can stay outside...

LTF- What I great idea! I didn't go to a shelter to get my good-as-gold guard dog, he found me. Ben is a funny-looking black dog who looks like a cross between a Bassett and a Lab.

He showed up at my house one day, and curled up at the front door. I put up signs and ran an ad, but no one came for him.

He is quite happy to live in the fenced backyard with a dog house on the back gallery. Before Ben came, my house had been egged twice by students- egging teachers' homes is an unfortunate long-standing tradition in this rural town.

But ever-vigilant Ben put a stop to all that with his big loud bark. (He may be a short dog, but his bark sounds like it belongs to a great big dog.) Before Ben arrived, my three completely useless but lovable inside dogs- Pekes-- slept through both egg attacks.

But now, when Ben barks outside, they bark inside and alert me to any visitors- day or night. Ben has an uncanny ability to sense when people are around- even in the front yard while he is in the back. So getting a second dog from a shelter- one with a nice big loud voice, might be a solution.:)

macrylinda1
Aug. 18, 2010, 12:24 PM
Even just the "security camera" signs alone might be a deterrant.

In addition to the suggestions offered, I would electrify the fence in such a way that the gate cannot be opened without turning off the power. Heck, I'd electrify the entire gate, not just a strand on top of it!

And I'd install motion lights by every possible entrance to the property and paddock.

Good suggestions. I am going shopping for battery operated motion detector lights. I have 5' no climb with electric on top, so the only way in and out is the gates. Ugh...

I will look into the driveway warning. Problem is the paddock fronts the road for about 100'. I see tire tracks past the paddock on the road, away from the house.

kinnip
Aug. 18, 2010, 12:27 PM
Wal-mart sells game cams for about $50. They're motion sensitive and have a flash function. That should scare off most idiots and you'll have a photo to take to the cops.

JSPDesign
Aug. 18, 2010, 12:33 PM
Glad that nothing bad has occurred! This might be one of the few times I'm glad I have a horse that really only likes his own family and detests trailer rides! He wouldn't be as easy to take as he looks. ;)

Jamie