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View Full Version : OT: HORSE BOARDING AND IRS



Blinkers
Aug. 6, 2010, 12:30 PM
for those of you who board horses at your place do you claim it?

SMF11
Aug. 6, 2010, 01:10 PM
Good lord! :eek:

Blinkers
Aug. 6, 2010, 01:46 PM
Good lord! :eek:

??????????

Petstorejunkie
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:02 PM
MYOB

mpsbarnmanager
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:12 PM
In a nutshell, yes, I think it would be wrong of you to report them.

I board a few horses and I do report my income every year. I don't need the iRS knockin on my door, who does???

IMHO, it is none of anyone elses business. Yes it is wrong, but there ate probably hundreds of thousands of people ripping off the iRS right now. Some will get caught, some will get lucky. How would you feel if roles were reversed and someone tattled on you? You are just speculating, you can't know the situation if you are a third party.

Given enough time, the iRS will probably catch up to them without your help.

DandyMatiz
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:16 PM
I disagree. It's a major, major issue. Not enough people report it sadly, when they know it's wrong. I believe there is an anonymous number you can call.. but i can't remember. I'm sure google would give you the info needed.

Doesn't matter if they are making money "under the table" in waitressing, hairstyling, horses, or mechanic work. All income should be reported. (yes, when I waitressed, i was the nutjob who claimed all her tips.. did it for 2 years, and the 3rd year i worked there, 8 of the other waitresses got audited... not pretty.. Always claim your income.. correctly). *sigh*

Bluey
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:16 PM
If the IRS has been after them before, I would guess they are keeping an eye on them, since cheaters tend to be repeaters.
One of those days, if they are fudging with the book keeping, they will find themselves in very unpleasant circumstances.

Are you sure you really know what their books look like?
When they tell you something, you may not be hearing what they are really saying, they may just be blowing about it, but still minding their accountant p's and q's.

Up to you to decide if they really are evading taxes, not just sounds like it and if so, if you want to do anything about it.:confused:

DandyMatiz
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:18 PM
Actually, it's not up to her to decide. She can report suspected activity, and then the I.R.S. looks into it. It's like calling AC.. you suspect something NQR, place a call into the authorities, and then they decide if there is a violation.

rodawn
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:32 PM
Anybody who hasn't smudged just a wee teeniest bit on their taxes, or decided not to correct the cashier when she gave you wrong change, or never ran a red light, or never drove their auto faster than the speed limit (ALL of which is breaking the law, I point out), then YOU can be the first in line to report it.

Otherwise, keep to your own business.

Blinkers
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:45 PM
Anybody who hasn't smudged just a wee teeniest bit on their taxes, or decided not to correct the cashier when she gave you wrong change, or never ran a red light, or never drove their auto faster than the speed limit (ALL of which is breaking the law, I point out), then YOU can be the first in line to report it.

Otherwise, keep to your own business.

u are saying cheating the government out of thousands of dollars and making honest tax payers pay for the fraud is equivalent to going faster than the speed limit? :eek:

TheRedFox
Aug. 6, 2010, 02:49 PM
With the money that this person is saving evading the IRS, would you say that they are most likely using said money to stimulate the US economy by buying goods and services from the US?

I would be way more concerned with people making non-reported earnings in this country and sending it back to the country of their origin and stimulating that economy.

Bluey
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:02 PM
u are saying cheating the government out of thousands of dollars and making honest tax payers pay for the fraud is equivalent to going faster than the speed limit? :eek:

In an important way, yes.
I NEVER go over the speed limit, or run a stop sign or red light.
That doesn't mean that at some time, I may have been distracted and speeded for a little, until I realized it and cut back. Speed control is my friend any more.:)

The difference is, some people speed knowingly, some cheat, don't just make a mistake.

I think that IRS knows the difference, although it does punish all and so does the cop that sees you speeding.:yes:

If those people are past cheaters and are bragging about cheating now, well, I don't know that they deserve much respect.
But, who should tell the IRS about it, their "friend"?
That, I dunno.:no:
Glad not to be in those shoes.;)

shortbusgeek
Aug. 6, 2010, 04:02 PM
Look at it like this. Sure, they may be making INCOME of $20k per year. But look at the deductions that they're also allowed. Do you think they could deduct at least that in depreciation, equipment, feed and other expenses? They may just figure it's easier to not say anything than have to deal with another half inch thick full of forms. Our tax return last year was like a small book. We purchased two trucks, a tractor and a horse trailer last year amongst other farm expenses (we started up in 2009) and between the various forms for that as well as our investment income it was a real headache.

Secondly, have you seen their tax return? How do you know what they're claiming and what they're not?

On another note, I'd much rather have a consumption tax to pay than an income tax. It'd save me a few days a year.

Blinkers
Aug. 6, 2010, 04:16 PM
Edited

MLD
Aug. 6, 2010, 04:23 PM
They must be boarding a LOT of SKINNY horses to be netting $20k a year.

They may have $20k a year in income, but what do they have in expenses? Everything from the hay to cell phones can be deducted from their business and then there is the depreciation they can take on all the fixed assets. While yes, this should all be reported, what is truly the bottom line? and is it really that important.

I always heard that the way to make a small fortune in horses is start out with a large one so I can't imagine that they are really netting that much out of their little boarding business.

Lori B
Aug. 6, 2010, 04:24 PM
Bad Karma. Don't do it.

LauraKY
Aug. 6, 2010, 04:44 PM
Oh for Pete's sake. Get a life. You've just admitted that you wouldn't report them if they were a friend, so lose the holier than thou attitude. I don't know ANYONE making money in just boarding, as a matter of fact, everyone I know loses money on their boarding operation; the true income comes from training and lessons.

So, in all likelihood, if they filed a tax return, they could take a loss against their income and pay less tax than they currently do. Why can't you just MYOB?

And, I can't believe that you just compared speeding to rape! Good lord!

Sure hope you live no where near me. By the way, I do report ALL my income.

Blinkers
Aug. 6, 2010, 05:07 PM
Edited

pezk
Aug. 6, 2010, 05:35 PM
so..... you wouldn't turn in your friends even if they were cheating every taxpayer out of thousands of dollars, but you want to turn these people in because you don't like them? is that what i read? This isn't about the IRS losing money, this is nastiness, pure and simple. And since when does anyone make money boarding horses? Do you really believe that there are no costs associated with rough boarders for the barn owner? OH please...... MYOB.

casper324
Aug. 6, 2010, 05:48 PM
"for your info no expenses involved with keeping the horses as all the horses are self care by their owners

except a fence or two that decides to go down which does not happen very often"

Blinkers I think you are forgetting little things like Real Estate taxes, insurance, upkeep on the barn and other facilities. Figure out what an acre of land would cost in your area and what the real estate taxes are.........TRUST ME they have many other expenses then you realize.

Blinkers
Aug. 6, 2010, 05:54 PM
"for your info no expenses involved with keeping the horses as all the horses are self care by their owners

except a fence or two that decides to go down which does not happen very often"

Blinkers I think you are forgetting little things like Real Estate taxes, insurance, upkeep on the barn and other facilities. Figure out what an acre of land would cost in your area and what the real estate taxes are.........TRUST ME they have many other expenses then you realize.

Edited

LauraKY
Aug. 6, 2010, 06:53 PM
I really dislike vindictive, holier than thou, people! Like I said, MYBO and GET A LIFE!

Hope Karma bites you in the butt!

How on earth do you know they have no liability insurance? Do you have their house wired? Are you listening in on their wireless phones? You sound like a pretty scary neighbor. I have a backyard barn and, believe me, I have liability insurance for everything with an umbrella policy to cover everything else that could possibly happen.

Although a lot of their expenses would still have to paid if they didn't have boarders, that all, miraculously, becomes tax deductible when you declare the income. To the point that, if it's a business and not a hobby, you can write off against your regular income and pay NO taxes on your regular income if you work it right. One the advice of your CPA only, I might add. I know someone who had a bad year expense wise last year and got back more than they paid in taxes and they had quite a healthy salary outside the boarding business. You obviously just want to cause trouble. What did they do to you?