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View Full Version : CoTH Enables Needed: Shelter Dog Coming Home?- Sad Update Pg. 2



BCEVENTER
Aug. 5, 2010, 11:07 PM
This poor girl has been in one of the community shelters out here for EIGHT MONTHS! I sent in an application that was accepted and went in today and met her. She is such a sweetie and she needs a new name. In the shelter she goes by Chaze (pronounced Chazz.....not my thing). Any ideas?

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=6860470&l=d0153c6be0&id=526175329

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=6860467&l=818c043245&id=526175329

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=6860462&l=538652137e&id=526175329

RHdobes563
Aug. 6, 2010, 12:02 AM
Chanel? (Like the perfume)

Crooked Horse
Aug. 6, 2010, 12:22 AM
No name suggestions, but she's beautiful and you rock!

MelanieC
Aug. 6, 2010, 12:30 AM
She looks like a Greta to me. Congratulations!

citydog
Aug. 6, 2010, 12:30 AM
She's absolutely *gorgeous*!

Congratulations!

(The right name will come to you when you know her a little better. :))

shakeytails
Aug. 6, 2010, 03:56 AM
She's so pretty! I'd probably call her Bella. That's exactly why I don't visit the shelters- if I saw a dog like that there's no way I could come home without her, especially if she were an older dog. Are those gray hairs on her muzzle or just her coloring?

Polydor
Aug. 6, 2010, 05:15 AM
aww beautiful girl! Good on you for taking her home!

P.

SMF11
Aug. 6, 2010, 07:30 AM
That is one GREAT looking dog!

Bluey
Aug. 6, 2010, 07:35 AM
Sweet looking dog.:)

ryansgirl
Aug. 6, 2010, 07:55 AM
I'm not good w/ name suggestions sorry! But I did want to say congrats and thank you for adopting from a shelter... shelter dogs make the best pets :). Enjoy her - she is beautiful!

monstrpony
Aug. 6, 2010, 08:29 AM
One Lucky Dog. (no, don't name her Lucky, just don't, don't, don't).

PRS
Aug. 6, 2010, 08:30 AM
Awww....she's beautiful! She reminds me of a dog I loved when I when I was little, she wasn't ours but we boarded her for a lady who had health problems and was in and out of the hospital a lot. Her name was Queenie.

caper
Aug. 6, 2010, 08:33 AM
I am sure once you get to know her a name will fit. Being older she may know her name so try something that sounds similar or close to the first part of her name phonetically. So she will still respond.
It is a lovely dog and I can't imagine waiting 8 month to get a home. Kudos to you.

Zu Zu
Aug. 6, 2010, 09:03 AM
Bless you for giving her a "home" she is lovely ~ enjoy ~

Paddys Mom
Aug. 6, 2010, 09:52 AM
Oh bless you for taking her in.
She will know she hit the lottery. :yes:

minnie
Aug. 6, 2010, 10:01 AM
I vote for "Cherry on Top" ! I can't believe she sat for 8 months with no one taking her home!

pj
Aug. 6, 2010, 10:48 AM
One Lucky Dog. (no, don't name her Lucky, just don't, don't, don't).
LOL what's wrong with Lucky?
I've got one named Lucky and he came from the shelter fifteen years ago. He was a year old and is with us still.
I had gone to pick up another dog for my daughter when I saw this guy and fell in love. When I asked about him they said he wasn't adoptable and was going to be put down the next day. Seems he had bitten someone. I argued but couldn't budge them. He was going to be gassed the next day and that was that. My heart was broken but I had to leave without him.

Next morning I got a call and it seems they had him confused with the dog he was in with so if I wanted him....I got there within the hour!

Two days later as I was doing barn chores he came running up to me bringing an empty bag that had contained rat poison! It had been a new bag high on a shelf in the tack room and now it was torn and EMPTY. He was very pleased with himself. I haven't a clue how it had come off the shelf but it evidently had.
I poured peroxcide down him and oh my....at the green and white gunk. Ran him to the vet for a vitamin k shot and he never missed a beat.

We decided that since he had escaped death twice in two days he just HAD to be named Lucky. During this last fifteen years Lucky has been the most healthy and loyal and loving dog you can imagine. He's still spry and healthy and I hope he will be with us another fifteen years!

pj
Aug. 6, 2010, 10:58 AM
was just able to see the pictures and she IS beautiful! Love those eyes, too!
:) How could you not take her home!!

BCEVENTER
Aug. 6, 2010, 12:23 PM
She is only about 3. If you noticed, her paws also have slightly white coloring, just like her nose. The white paws/nose/chest is a give-away for Australian Shepards. So while it LOOKS like she is ancient (the ridiculously poofy coat doesn't help either), she is only about 3.
She has had 4 homes in those 3 years though, and she is ready to come home finally!
I think we have decided on Addison, or Addy for short!

SMF11
Aug. 6, 2010, 01:12 PM
LOL what's wrong with Lucky?


I have a veterinarian friend who says this -- if you name the dog Lucky, odds are he won't be. She's given me (sad) examples of this too!

leilatigress
Aug. 6, 2010, 01:14 PM
Love the name and grats on the lovely girl. My guy was a rehab/shelter/rescue reject and I was his last ditch effort of a home. Haven't regretted it since, and I adore him!

Bluey
Aug. 6, 2010, 01:45 PM
I have a veterinarian friend who says this -- if you name the dog Lucky, odds are he won't be. She's given me (sad) examples of this too!

Still, the odds are in your favor to call one Lucky.:yes:
From all the dogs called Lucky, how many were not lucky?;)

I know several horses called Lucky but only one unlucky one.
Grandma gave one of our best gray colts to a neighbor, that had admired him since he was born.
He took him to his place at weaning, called him Lucky and worked with him, taking him along with his riding horses when he was checking cattle, until he was ready to start under saddle.
He was extremely proud of that colt, how smart he was and nice to handle.
That spring, Lucky and two older geldings got into some loco weed and had to be euthanized.:cry:

I don't think the Lucky name had anything to do with it, it was one of those things that happen.
Our neighbor, now elderly, was inconsolable for long time.
Lucky was to be his next great personal horse, for the rest of his life.

I would not be afraid to call anyone Lucky, it is a nice name.:cool:

snkstacres
Aug. 6, 2010, 06:08 PM
OK that dog is just lovely. Simply a dollbaby. Thankyou for homing a shelter dog.

jetsmom
Aug. 7, 2010, 01:40 AM
She's gorgeous! Reminds me of my Chow/Border collie mix I have that was a stray for 3 years (took me 9 months to catch him).

She'll amaze you with her gratitude.

BCEVENTER
Aug. 13, 2010, 12:31 AM
Sad update here.
Today she went after three people with teeth bared. I've had her for a week and while she is getting better with me, she is getting more aggressive towards other people.
While I would be more than happy to work with a trainer, I fear that I won't be able to trust her, so she is going back tomorrow.
If I hadn't been holding onto her when she went at my dad, he would be in the hospital right now :(
Please don't flame me for not giving her a chance. She scared the CRAP out of me when she went after these people (one of which was a father and son) and her issues are obviously beyond my comfort zone. It's not fair for either of us that I put her in a situation that makes her feel like this :(

appaloosalady
Aug. 13, 2010, 12:45 AM
Please don't feel bad for taking her back. You gave her a chance and now you know why she went through so many owners in such a short time. I know I will take a lot of flack for this, but I tell people to never bring an adult dog home from anywhere unless you KNOW everything about its history. Too many of them have major baggage and it can be dangerous to people and other animals. Just ask my youngest daughter who had to see a boarder's new shelter dog kill her cat right in front of her because they wanted to use my farm to see how he got along with other animals ( I was not home ). Nope, I will never adopt an adult dog under any circumstances.

citydog
Aug. 13, 2010, 12:55 AM
So sorry to hear that. :(

I hope you find the right dog soon, and that this doesn't cloud your feelings towards other shelter dogs.

citydog
Aug. 13, 2010, 01:16 AM
Too many of them have major baggage and it can be dangerous to people and other animals.

Which is why systematic temperament evaluations are so very important.


Just ask my youngest daughter who had to see a boarder's new shelter dog kill her cat right in front of her because they wanted to use my farm to see how he got along with other animals ( I was not home ).

That is far more the fault of a phenomenally stupid boarder than that of the dog. The dog should never have been allowed access to the cat until proven safe (either through nature or training).

Poor kitty. I hope the boarder was sent packing--I wouldn't have anyone that lacking in common sense on my property.

I've worked with many thousands of dogs and placed hundreds. While no animal is ever truly bombproof, I would not hesitate to place (or adopt for myself) adult dogs that have been evaluated by a knowledgeable tester and been in an equally knowledgeable foster home for at least a few weeks. I do have reservations about placing dogs with unknown histories straight from a shelter into homes with young children, or extremely novice (or stupid like your boarder) owners.

If I eval and pull an unknown adult from a shelter, I don't just cross my fingers and turn it loose with my own animals or family right away. It earns its privileges and my trust. It's unfair to all concerned to just cross your fingers and hope for the best. Similarly, I don't just throw a new horse out with the others with no introductions or getting to know each other over the fence, and don't hop on bareback, helmetless, with just a halter and a leadrope alone in a field at night for a gallop as a first ride. Everyone needs time to settle in.


Sadly, too many shelters don't have the resources to do comprehensive, accurate temperament evaluations on the dogs or interviews with the people to find the best matches.

casper324
Aug. 13, 2010, 06:20 AM
Although I totally agree with you being uncomfortable with this dog since she barred her teeth at your Dad, I wanted to say in her defense she's only been with you a week and that is a short time for her to adjust. Shelter dogs need to settle in, learn their new home/rules. She probably thought she was protecting you from a stranger, she doesn't know your family ties.
That said a Chow's are not my favorite breed, I don't trust them, they are very protective. HOwever they are also loyal and protective to their owners which isn't a bad thing depending on your situation.
I guess what I am saying is if you get along with this dog well and like her, it will work out with patience and love.

Zu Zu
Aug. 13, 2010, 08:07 AM
Thoughts and prayers and huge hugs for everyone involved ~ bless you and your family for trying ~ thank goodness no one was hurt ~ Jingles for your heart as this must be the toughest of decisions ~

Bluey
Aug. 13, 2010, 08:47 AM
Our animal control shelter doesn't pre approve dogs, although it has a section closed to the public for dogs that have been shown to be aggressive or bite cases.

Anyone can go thru the pens and ask to get a dog out, that is taken to the visiting pen and they can interact with the dog and learn what history, if any, it came with the dog.
Now, dogs only have three days, so there is no real time to judge, you really don't know until you have the dog home.

Still, we rarely get a dog back as aggressive, because most touchy dogs do show you that when you first met and handle them.

There is a great shelter assessing and retraining program, called the Walter Turken Shelter dog program, that any shelter can apply for and some of their staff and/or volunteer can take their instruction:

http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/Org/33278-147

It is correct that some dog breeds are known for a more sharp temperament and can act or become too aggressive, chows some of them.

Still, you always have to evaluate the individual dog in itself, not by preconceived ideas of what the possible breed may bring.

Sorry that your dog is not working for you, but don't fret about it, that happens sometimes, be it your new human friend, horse or dog, that just are not a good match for you.

I bet there is a neat dog out there that will fit your family well.:)

tikihorse2
Aug. 13, 2010, 11:31 AM
She's a beautiful dog and bless you for giving her a chance-- why WOULDN'T you? And I don't blame you for returning her. An unpredictable dog could harm someone so badly.

It was so wonderful that you gave her a chance. Just bad luck it didn't work out.

Kim

Trakehner
Aug. 13, 2010, 12:28 PM
She had one more chance than anyone expected. Chows and chow crosses can be scary...very teritorial and very very able to do something about protecting "their" place.

Glad you kept any drama to just emotional.

You tried, next time, you'll succeed...some dogs, no matter how much you care and how understading you are just don't work.

Doberpei
Aug. 13, 2010, 01:10 PM
in her defense she's only been with you a week and that is a short time for her to adjust. Shelter dogs need to settle in, learn their new home/rules. She probably thought she was protecting you from a stranger, she doesn't know your family ties.

I guess what I am saying is if you get along with this dog well and like her, it will work out with patience and love.


I rescued an adult Shar Pei/Doberman mix from a shelter, and it was just about a week to the day she started doing this. The first person she went after was a coworker, who happened to be a vet tech, who recognized the problem for just what Casper said. My friend also suggested we get into training IMMEDIATELY. Which I did.

It wasn't easy, and I was never comfortable with people coming towards me quickly because my dog was protective. However, she was also sweet and loving with strangers as long as she approached them.

When my rescued coonhound started doing similar things, I tried all the things that worked with my other dog, but they didn't work with him as he had way too many other issues. The shelter said it takes a minimum of three months for an adult dog to settle into new surroundings. At the end of three months with this dog, I knew he would never settle, and two trainer/behaviorists told me he was downright dangerous, and would hurt someone - soon. Sadly, the folks at the shelter who temperament tested him, found him withdrawn and mellow. He could be mellow, except when he was on a rage, which, after two months, started happening more regularly.

Adult dogs from shelters can be tough, and dogs hard wired for protection more so. But you have to do what you are comfortable with. Don't give up on rescue!