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Maude
Aug. 5, 2010, 09:48 AM
I have a 2006 Ford F250 diesel short bed truck. I'd like to eventually get a small LQ trailer. I currently tow an Exiss event GN w/4' DR. The payload for my truck is 15,000 pounds. My question: What is the largest LQ/weekended package trailer that I can tow with my current truck? An F350/duelly is not an option at this time. Thanks

Guilherme
Aug. 5, 2010, 10:26 AM
I have a 2006 Ford F250 diesel short bed truck. I'd like to eventually get a small LQ trailer. I currently tow an Exiss event GN w/4' DR. The payload for my truck is 15,000 pounds. My question: What is the largest LQ/weekended package trailer that I can tow with my current truck? An F350/duelly is not an option at this time. Thanks

If your towing capacity is 15,000 lbs. then the largest LQ rig you can tow, loaded, will weigh 15,000 lbs. QED. :)

Sadly, this does not answer the question you seem to be asking which is "how many horses and how much LQ?" There is no "school" answer to this.

The first big divide is AL vs. steel. Steel is significantly heavier. Then there is the question of amenities. How much refrigerator, couch, dinette, bathroom, etc. Are there slides (slide outs weigh 1000-1500 lbs., for example)? The more “homey” the trailer, the more it will weigh empty (meaning fewer horses, less water, less forage/fodder, etc.). The alternative is a bigger truck.

Your best bet is likely to visit some trailer sellers (ones with a decent used inventory) and "kick some tires." Also hit some of the internet trailer seller sites to see what's available. One of the biggest frustrations you'll face is that very few people know what their rig weighs empty. We have a 4 horse Featherlight with a very modest "weekender" LQ. It weighs in at 7300 lbs., almost empty. But, as I say, the LQ is quite "Spartan" and most 4 horse units will go for at least another 1000 lbs. if they are AL. A steel unit will run 20-25% more. A two horse will be less, a six horse more.

Again, there is no simple “school” answer. Good luck in your search.

G.

mvp
Aug. 5, 2010, 10:50 AM
Two rules of thumb.

Don't get too little truck for the job. You'll suffer from frequent white knuckles or worse.

Don't underestimate how much weight you are actually hauling. I say this because LQ trailers offer the possibility of throwing in an enormous amount of crap whose weight adds up in an "under the radar" way. Sure, you know the weight of your trailer empty. You know what your horses weigh. But traveling with an LQ, now add in every saddle, trunk, water tank. Then how about the big ol' cooler, full propane tank, hibachi, set of chairs, food, clothes etc.? Because it didn't take two people to move any of these things, you tend not to think of them in terms of "too heavy" or adding lots of weight.

Stopping by a truck scale when you are fully loaded for an average trip might be a good idea at least once.

2bee
Aug. 5, 2010, 11:34 AM
First off the 15,000 lbs is the max trailer weight, not the payload. Payload is what the truck can carry (which is probably around ~3000 lbs if you load by the rear axle) and is going to be the limiting factor with 3/4 tons and LQ. With a LQ you'll hit the 3000 lbs pin weight before you'll hit the 15,000 lbs trailer. "What's the pin weight?" should be your first question when LQ shopping.

Too many variables to give you a good answer, but a 6'-8' short wall will be in the ball park for a 3/4 ton pickup. I would leave the slides and marble floors/countertops for the duallys. ;)

Maude
Aug. 5, 2010, 12:23 PM
Not the slide out, marble counter top type here :) Just looking for something decent to camp in at shows, etc. Also that we can haul a motorcycle in (not when hauling the horses) so hubby and I can stay in the LQ and haul the bike too for travel.

BBowen
Aug. 5, 2010, 01:20 PM
I have a 2004 Chevy 2500HD crew cab with tow package. It is the largest engine that Chevy made for this truck at the time, 8.1 L, V-8 (sucks down the gas), and I pull a Hawk, 2-horse straight load with an 8-foot short wall LQ. This truck pulls with the trailer loaded with no problem. It has never felt like it was struggling at any time.

Jaegermonster
Aug. 6, 2010, 10:19 PM
I have an 02 F250 power stroke diesel, short box crew cab. I have a 2h GN with a big dressing room that it pulls like a dream.
I also have a 3h LQ (12' shortwall). The trailer weighs 8000 lbs empty, and loaded is almost the max that my truck can handle, not quite but as close as I feel comfortable with.
If my truck were not a crew cab I would not feel comfortable pulling the trailer (it's 28' long) due to the wheelbase, both trailers are all aluminum.
We do plan to get a dually, it would be better for the truck and stability for the big trailer, the LQ just came along at too good a deal to pass up so we grabbed it up and plan to buy a new truck when we can. I mostly haul the 2h around unless i need the LQ or need to haul 3 horses.

I did have 2 extra springs put into the rear end of my truck and they made all the difference in the world when pulling that big trailer. You may want to consider doing that, it was only about $500 for the two springs.

I do know of a person who has a 4h gn with a huge slide out LQ pulling it around with a newer F250, and I swear you can hear that poor truck screaming all the way down the road. People shake their heads when she drives by. It's pretty scary.

cherham
Aug. 7, 2010, 09:02 AM
We have an older Dodge 3/4 pickup, single axle, regular cab, Cummins 5.9 diesel that we haul our 3 horse slant with an 8 foot short wall LQ. It has lots of power and torque for our trailer but as mentioned above even empty this trailer is heavy for it's length due to the extra weight of the galley (fridge, stove, water tanks, shower stall etc etc etc.) Our trailer is aluminum. I don't think we would want to haul a steel trailer fully loaded quite frankly but this set up does us just fine. Oh and the living quarters is a HUGE bonus at even the day shows. Just a nice place to relax, enjoy a cold drink or hot shower and watch your classes on TV with your friends. You will love it!

Maude
Aug. 7, 2010, 09:22 AM
Thanks everyone! Sounds like an aluminum trailer with a smaller LQ and booster springs is the way to go. I wouldn't want one too large as I can only afford one trailer and don't want to drive to lessons and locally towing a "brontosaurus". I am hooked on straight loads though and only need a 2 horse. Maybe this type of trailer would weigh a bit less?