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BEARCAT
Jul. 29, 2010, 05:47 PM
How well do they really work?

I have 2 Aussies that like to run (and chase birds, stray dogs, etc) onto the road. We are on 4 acres and are thinking of putting one of these up:

http://www.petco.com/product/5884/PetSafe-In-Ground-Radio-System-Fence.aspx?CoreCat=SBB

PetSafe In-Ground Radio Fence Deluxe Pet Containment System
Model PRF-304W (Deluxe) - For Pets Over 8 lbs. - Covers 25 Acres
SKU: 564583
PetSafe In-Ground Radio Fence Deluxe Pet Containment System
FEATURES
The Deluxe Radio Fence incorporates all the benefits of the Standard Radio Fence plus:

Deluxe transmitter with AC adapter which covers up to 25 acres
Five adjustable levels to fit the sensitivity of your dog.
Low battery indicator.
Anti-Linger: doesn’t allow the dog to hang out right on the border and run the battery down.
Run Through Protection: automatically ramps to a higher level if the dog is running toward the border at a high rate of speed.


I undertand training is a big part of it, but the bottom line is, will this type of fence effectively stop a running (chasing) dog from going on the road?

Experiences? Good? Bad? Not worth it? Yes works great?

Diamondindykin
Jul. 29, 2010, 05:53 PM
I didn't buy the exact model that you posted but I bought a brand new one still in the package on Craigslist for $35 :D It works fantastic for my Border Collie. All it took was one shock and he never went near the fence line again. Although he is a super sensitive dog to trauma. He did eventually figure out if he didn't have the collar on that he wouldn't get shocked so we just leave it on him when he is outside.

MelanieC
Jul. 29, 2010, 06:39 PM
I personally would never trust an electronic fence to stop dogs from chasing small animals. The shock is only momentary for a dog running at full speed and many dogs bull right through them. And then, after they're done chasing, they are stuck outside of the fence and may not be as motivated to get back inside.

I am not a fan of electronic fences, because (1) I don't use shock collars, (2) they don't stop really motivated dogs, and (3) they don't keep other animals from coming into the yard, and while that is undesirable enough as it is I think it is really unfair to allow strange dogs into and out of a yard without giving the resident dogs some avenue of escape. I know a lot of people use electronic fences and are happy with them, but for my three Border Collies (one of whom is a very enthusiastic cat and squirrel chaser) I would never trust anything less than a hard fence, even though they all have rock-solid recalls. I want them to be secure in their yard when they are out there.

Is it possible to put up a real fence and create a secure dog yard? That would be my personal preference. I often walk past dogs behind electronic fences in my neighborhood and I hate to see them back there simultaneously defending their territory and cringing away from the boundaries of the yard. I also wonder what they would do if the power was out after having spent so much time being frustrated and anxious about getting shocked. Aussies are guardy anyway and I would worry that they may become TOO defensive, if you get my drift.

MistyBlue
Jul. 29, 2010, 06:44 PM
I swapped my late Malamute from an in-ground wire shock fence to a radio shock fence.
What a difference! I'll never use the in ground wire again.
Mals are tall, super thick coats and stubborn as mules. Kodiak was more than happy to take a single zap to go walkabout. (and that's all he ever did, walk around, not chasing anything or following a scent)
After I swapped to the radio fence...well instead of one shock when they leave the containment area they get a warning zap...a few seconds and then followed by zaps every other second until they return. No possibility of the dog "taking on for the team" and then going off. They return every single time and immediately. At a run!

My Mal has since passed away and my current dog does not leave the specified yard area. Not even chasing deer...he'll bolt after one all out and when he hits his "no zone" he skids to a stop. We live far from the road and when he goes out, I go out. So I hadn't used my radio fence for a few years.

My niece moved down the road from me and not too long ago got her first dog. A Walker Hound. A "chase anything that moves and follow every scent" hound. :lol: He's just turned 6 months old, I gave her my radio fence and collar and she bought new flags to train him with. That was a month ago, it took one day to teach him and he's now able to go outside and doesn't go anywhere near his boundaries! Even if they go for a walk, he sits inside the yard and waits.

So it's a pretty good fence for those "hard to contain" type dogs IMO. I have/had a...erm...I think it was called a Guardian? I bought it 7 years ago at a Petco for $200. Worth every penny. It's a smaller one, works for up to 1/2 acre I think. But it's nice that it can be moved and used anywhere there's somewhere to plug it in. I've brought it on picnics so my dog could come and stay in the area.

No wires to bury, nothing but a unit you plug in inside the house and the receiving collar. The unit sends out a signal to the collar so it does NOT zap (opposite of the wire in the ground type) and if the dog leaves the area it keeps zapping until they return, so no chance of a dog rocketing past the shock zone when excited and getting away. They rocket past the zone...stop dead, yip and circle a second and then rocket even faster back to the house!

CatOnLap
Jul. 29, 2010, 06:59 PM
well, thanks Misty- see my thread on rotties...they could've cared less about the "in ground"( actually, the MFG said it could be inground or strung on our fencing, which is what we did) system I paid $300 for from Petsafe, if they were after a rabbit... Plus, the wire supplied by Petsafe basically started falling apart after about a year and we had so many breaks in the circuit we gave up.

I may give the radio transmitter one a try.
How do you train them for that type? We spent weeks training them to the inground boundary according the MFG's directions, but one rabbit...and no training would have helped.

citydog
Jul. 29, 2010, 07:09 PM
Hate 'em.

They don't keep other animals out, they won't stop a drivey dog (there is *always* going to be something out there that will get a dog to go through the fence--and once they do it they tend to keep getting out), too many dogs figure out how to beat them, and in the case of the radio type that Misty Blue described, it's a great way to send a more sensitive, reactive (think herding breeds) dog fleeing for the hills in blind panic to the point of exhaustion.

I've also seen a number of dogs that build unfortunate associations between the zaps and other things: dog is excited and wants to go see the family friend coming up the driveway-->gets zapped-->fears not only family friend, but also anyone coming up driveway-->becomes defensively aggressive. One of my dogs panics when called *towards* the house on damp, misty days because of an IF mishap in her first home (went out of the yard after a bicycle on a damp day, got zapped on her way back).

We get too many dogs into rescue (I work mostly with Border Collies) that have developed IF problems. I would *never* trust my dogs' safety to one, and recommend against them for clients' dogs unless it's a last resort sort of thing like a zoning or homeowners' group issue, and even then recommend that they have one of the professional fence companies come and install and train.

Some wire mesh fence and t-posts can make a fine and inexpensive hard fence.

Tommy's Girl
Jul. 29, 2010, 07:23 PM
I have the Sport Dog one, that you don't have to bury. You just use lawn staples to put it on the perimeter (you can also just staple it to fence poles), which is a lot easier than burying it. My dog doesn't cross it to save her life - one shock was enough. I also like that the Sport Dog one has five levels of shock, so you can adjust it to what you need.

We have all manner of wildlife, all of which she wants to chase, but doesn't.

Pennywell Bay
Jul. 29, 2010, 08:05 PM
I don't trust them. I agree that a dog on a mission will just blast through them. Most even state they are not "for all dogs". Honestly- I trained my shepherds with an electric sport collar. It only took a few times of my giving the stop command and zapping them that they would halt in their tracks. ( they were very obedient to begin). My female needs the collar on for proofing by the male has not had it for years and still will drop like a rock if I yell the command word. They both avoid the areas where they are not supposed to go. Good luck.

CatOnLap
Jul. 29, 2010, 08:49 PM
Some wire mesh fence and t-posts can make a fine and inexpensive hard fence.
well, maybe if you've got a clear yard, easy soil and no brush. But for 3 acres, with lots of rocks thrusting out of the ground, and plenty of dense brush that would need to be cleared for the fenceline, not only is it ugly as sin, its darn difficult.

Equino
Jul. 29, 2010, 08:51 PM
I would not use or trust an invisible fence. But I am also one who does not believe in using shock-anything in training-like city dog said, I think it creates misdirected fear/aggression and that is not how I want my dogs to feel. However, my boss was intent on putting up an invisible fence line for her dogs so I convinced her to place it in a perimeter that was outlined by horse fencing and a driveway gate, this way the dogs were going to slow down as they approached the horse fencing and was less likely to run through the line. One dog was a rather sensitive pointer cross who was petrified of the fence line-however, she started snapping at strangers who came in after getting zapped as she approached them. The other could care less would would regularly walk through to greet the people, get zapped a few times, and walk back in with you, getting zapped again. Not my kind of thing.

Go Fish
Jul. 29, 2010, 08:51 PM
I personally would never trust an electronic fence to stop dogs from chasing small animals. The shock is only momentary for a dog running at full speed and many dogs bull right through them. And then, after they're done chasing, they are stuck outside of the fence and may not be as motivated to get back inside.

Bingo...my male Corgi has figured out that it's only a split second of shock and he's free. However, his motivation is the neighbor's cat food. My Corgi girl respects it...she stays put.

I was hoping to be able to use this fence so the dogs could stay out while I was gone. Forget it.

CatOnLap
Jul. 29, 2010, 09:00 PM
I wouldn't trust them either. But I am also one who does not believe in using shock-anything in training. However, my boss was intent on putting up an invisible fence line for her dogs so I convinced her to place it in a perimeter that was outlined by horse fencing, this way the dogs were going to slow down as they approached the horse fencing and was less likely to run through the line. Worked for them.

I wish. This is how our fence wire was installed and the dogs could care less.

Equino
Jul. 29, 2010, 09:04 PM
I just went back and edited my post-I wasn't going to add my last part but thought better of it after thinking how one of the dogs started snapping at people, she was truly afraid, and I always blamed her fear on misdirected aggression after getting zapped by the fence as she approached strangers. I think she wanted to greet people, or maybe just protect her territory, but then associated the zapping with the strangers and not the boundaries. However, the second one, a Bernese, was the same way as your dogs-could care less. He had no desire to wander, he just liked to meet visitors as they entered the property.

MistyBlue
Jul. 29, 2010, 09:43 PM
Well I;d never recommend a radio fence for folks who have issues with other dogs wandering onto the property. But for wildlife wandering on? I consider that a benefit of living in the woods. :yes: Plus I've never had snack sized dogs. :winkgrin:
Heck my Malamute used to play with the local coyote pair. They had a blast carrying sticks together, 3 to a stick.

CatOnLap...training for the radio fence wasn't hard at all. Use flags for a visible boundary and start oout using a leash on the dog. Approach flags...when the warning buzz is heard immediately use voice "Eh eh!" stern and then voice "Come back, come back" higher pitched, happy and excited as you pull them back to the safe zone or where you want them at a trot. Then stop, pats and praise.

Rinse a repeat a few times. I personally don't do the "zap them on purpose" because I don't want the dog to think I am the one zapping them. I want them to think it'll happen whether I'm there or not.

The repeated happy voice, removing them back swiftly to the safe zone and pats and praise convinces most dogs it's not something to freak out about and lets them know exactly where to go.

After a day or two of that, have them outside either off leash with you (or on a longe line if they're really stubborn about taking off all the time) and just watch them as they wander. If they wander too close to the flags, use the happy high pitched "Come back come back" command and claps your hands or jump up and down, anything to get them excited about coming back and away from the flags.

If they don't listen and get a zap, they'll yip. Start immediately towards the dog to bring them back physically while using the upbeat "come back" command. (or pull them back too using the longe) If they bolt the wrong way, they won't keep running. The zaps will slowly increase in frequency and duration the further they go away. Dogs usually end up circling or spinning backwards instead of running. Even real sprinters like sight hounds normally spin around or try backing away from the zaps instead of staying at a run.
Either way, simple to grab and return them while using an upbeat return command. Never use the growly "bad dog" voice for when they get zapped, that doesn't work so well.


I've seen them work wonderful on sight hounds, scent hounds and even stubborn as mule northern sled dogs. They seem to work better on the "won't work for every dog" buried wire types.

For anyone using any type of shock fence...make sure to buy a large package of the collar batteries and check those for changing at least once every 3 months. A dead battery does nothing and once the dog learns it can leave safely again (if they continue to test the fence) they retraining has to start all over.

Plus it only takes on escape to equal smooshed by car.

chancy deal
Jul. 29, 2010, 09:53 PM
I bought an invisible system from Innotek and it works great for my rottie mix. She was leaving the farm constantly, chasing deer. She stays home now.
It only took one time. Of course, we went around with her first and showed her what to do when she hears the warning beeps. She has never run through it.
We bought the heavier guage wire from Dog Watch and installed it. Didnt use any of the lighter-weight guage wire that came with the system. The wire Innotek sent was crap.
We love the invisible fence. It allows our dog to run over several acres.
I believe the same company makes both PetSafe and Innotek brands. We got our's from Cabelas.

Pocket Pony
Jul. 30, 2010, 12:01 AM
I have the Invisible Fence brand invisible fence and two 10-month-old pups. Our property is 5 acres and the IF is inside the border so they don't get the run of the entire 5 acres. They respect the boundaries and stay in their area. We did make sure to train them to it right away and so far so good.

CatOnLap
Jul. 30, 2010, 01:51 AM
I am thinking my dogs got dropped on their heads before we got them. We did the training as described by Mistyblue, and as demonstrated on the DVD that came with the fence system. They werea bout 4 months old whenwe started. We trained them every day, twice a day, for about 20 minutes, for several weeks, since it didn't seem to be taking. The problem did seem to be several fold- for one, yes the system came with collar batteries that died within the first two weeks, were replaced, and those ones lasted about a month, were replaced and again they lasted about a month. The collar batteries are not cheap- they were like $13 a pop. They are supposed to last several months. Second, the shock only occurs as the dog approached the wire and once they were over the boundary, it stopped. Third, our dogs have a lot of loose skin folds around their neck, so without choking them, its hard to guarantee the shock points make contact, fourth, after about a year, the supplied wire started to rot and short out- which is a PITA to trace the fault and repair it. We just gave up on that one.

At least the radio fence would avoid the second and fourth problems.

The fifth problem is apparently irresistible bunnies.

tpup
Jul. 30, 2010, 05:16 AM
So glad I saw this post! We moved into a property that has 3 acres Invisible Fenced. We have 3 Goldens. Two are older - 11 & 12 and the 12 has a tough time walking far. The youngest is 4 but she is quiet and somewhat timid, and can be spooky as h*** about "stuff". We always joke she would make THE spookiest horse. Our acreage is WIDE open and flat. Few trees and backs to several acres of open field, with woods behind that. All 3 of our acres are invisible fenced.

Installer/trainer came out yesterday to equip them with the collars and train "us". I started the initial training, one dog at a time.

The warning beep is SO quiet. Trainer says dogs can hear it but for me it is barely audible unless I bend over near the dogs collar to hear it. Regardless, he said to approach the flags (which are on the boundary) and when I am 2 feet away, to retreat to safe zone.

So far I both like it and dislike it. I like it because fencing the entire property would cost over 5k. I also love the idea of just opening the doors and letting them out...not worrying about my kids leaving doors ajar, etc.

I dislike the fact that I cannot walk my dogs for a month unless I DRIVE them down the driveway over the line :( They are used to a short walk daily at 6:00 am. It's always been "our time". So for now I will walk them in our yard in the safe zone and make it fun.

Also dislike the that the training will be LONG for 3 dogs, separately over 3 acres! I was pooped after the first session yesterday and have to do it twice a day for several weeks.

I am encouraged that after only a day, "spooky Golden" is getting it already. Husky/Golden mix who is older just got tired of the retreating over and over again by me, and I think is avoiding the fenceline because she is getting tired (she is 11 and slowing down too). The oldest simply cannot do the full training for long periods of time. Hers has to be short and spotty. Ex: one retreat/approach in the front, one in the back, and one on each side. No way can I keep zig-zagging her over 3 acres. She physically can't do it.

I think it will work for my girls, but the training is way more than I bargained for due to the size of our yard and the fact that we have 3. I wish a smaller area were boundaried.

Finally for those with the Inv. Fence brand, is it "normal" for the beep to be so quiet??

eponacelt
Jul. 30, 2010, 08:39 AM
We seriously considered invisible fence, but with two very prety driven Irish terriers, I just concluded I didn't think I could ever fully trust the fence. Ultimately, we fenced an 1/3 acre grassy area near the barn for the dog's field, and I feel confident that it will contain them. I wish I could just open the back door and let them run, but even though they are very trainable (one is an agility dog), their prey drive is just SO strong.

threedogpack
Jul. 30, 2010, 08:53 AM
I had one and the dogs (heavy, double coated dogs) blew through it. So then I put up a barrier fence and buried a new cable just inside it. The oldest dog eventually learned to kill the batteries, her daughter became afraid of the leash when I was training her. Another daughter refused to go off the back step for 2 weeks and when she finally did, was incredibly afraid of the yard in general.

I also got in a foster that had blown through an underground to grab a dog on the other side.

I use a barrier fence now.

msj
Jul. 30, 2010, 05:11 PM
I've had Invisible Fence for the 20+ yrs. For the first dog, a shelter mutt, it was great. Then I got an Aussie/Ridgeback puppy and he was good on it until he hit about 2 yrs old and decided he wanted to leave pound friend and visit the neighbor's little dog. I tried clipping the hair from around his neck to get a better ZAP! I also tried a stronger battery and finally ended up giving him to a girl from work with 5 greyhounds. I didn't want to come home to find roadkill.

I've since had a Rottie/Shepard mix on it, currently an Australian Cattle Dog (heeler) and another mixed breed, all pound dogs and they've been good. Oh yea, I also had a Chow mix that ran through it after deer and went back to the shelter, but for other reasons like snapping and growling at the hand that feeds it.:sigh:

People are right in that while it might keep your dog in, it doesn't keep other dogs out unless those dogs happen to be wearing IF collars. That did happen once with 2 labs that were loose out on the road, saw my dog and decided to come to visit. They got zapped and immediately left with their tails between their legs. :( Animal control did catch them though and eventually found their owners. :)

DopyDgz
Jul. 30, 2010, 07:18 PM
I only use them to reinforce a physical fence (prevent Houdini dogs from tunneling uder/jumping over). Any dog in the heat of the momemt will chase a rabbit through an ivisible fence alone (no solid fence), and it is really unfair not to keep other dogs out (they don't have the collar).

alteringwego
Jul. 30, 2010, 08:03 PM
I have a PetSafe Stubborn Dog system installed over nearly 10 acres. I LOVE my fence, when it is working... In hind sight, I should have concealed the wire within tube of some sort before buying the wire but lesson learned. I have breaks weekly and am constantly repairing wire over a lot of land. This is very time consuming and frankly a pain in the butt. However, the fence keeps the dogs contained VERY well. I have 2 hunting type dogs and they would love to roam and did before the fence. I made the perimeter of my fence match the fence lines so that there was a visual barrier as well as a shock barrier. This also keeps my dogs from chasing horses. I actually have 2 perimeters. One that covers a large amount of land and one closed off for just one paddock. That way when the farm is busy my dogs can get shut off in to the small paddock and stay safe. When things quiet down or in the evening they can have the run of the place. The fence gives me peace of mind for my beloved babies.

cheval convert
Aug. 1, 2010, 11:53 PM
Hate 'em.

They don't keep other animals out, they won't stop a drivey dog (there is *always* going to be something out there that will get a dog to go through the fence--and once they do it they tend to keep getting out), too many dogs figure out how to beat them, and in the case of the radio type that Misty Blue described, it's a great way to send a more sensitive, reactive (think herding breeds) dog fleeing for the hills in blind panic to the point of exhaustion.

I've also seen a number of dogs that build unfortunate associations between the zaps and other things: dog is excited and wants to go see the family friend coming up the driveway-->gets zapped-->fears not only family friend, but also anyone coming up driveway-->becomes defensively aggressive. One of my dogs panics when called *towards* the house on damp, misty days because of an IF mishap in her first home (went out of the yard after a bicycle on a damp day, got zapped on her way back).

We get too many dogs into rescue (I work mostly with Border Collies) that have developed IF problems. I would *never* trust my dogs' safety to one, and recommend against them for clients' dogs unless it's a last resort sort of thing like a zoning or homeowners' group issue, and even then recommend that they have one of the professional fence companies come and install and train.

Some wire mesh fence and t-posts can make a fine and inexpensive hard fence.

Actually, I have an australian shepherd with a very strong prey drive. I have the radio fence that Misty describes and it works beautifully. He reacts exactly as Misty described when he went outside the area, which has been once. He has not become more aggressive toward people. He is very aware of the boundary and never crosses it. He can be in full flight chasing deer, he hears the beep of the collar and his butt hits the ground. I think good training to it is part of the secret. The reactions you describe sound like the owners never properly trained the dogs to the fence and so things went wrong. Any tool, used improperly can cause problems. I suspect this is doubly true when dealing with any type of electric collar.

LauraKY
Aug. 2, 2010, 12:14 PM
Nothing will stop our coonhound when he's on the scent, except for a car door opening. He's right there, immediately, all ready for a ride.

MistyBlue
Aug. 2, 2010, 12:24 PM
LOL...the magical car door opening works like a charm for many dogs!

My Mal would go walkabout once in a while at our last house. Only way to nab him was to drive by slowly, then stop, swing a car door open and say the magic words, "Wanna go for a ride?" :D

Apparently the lazy bum would rather ride than walk.

And I'm sure it helped than many of his rides were with Mr Blue to go get a burger. :lol:

wendy
Aug. 2, 2010, 01:10 PM
I undertand training is a big part of it, but the bottom line is, will this type of fence effectively stop a running (chasing) dog from going on the road?


as you say, it depends on the training. Most people who have "failures" of these fences don't put in the solid weeks to months of TRAINING required to end up with a dog trained to be reliable to the boundary. It should be thought of as a training aid, not a fence. A dog properly trained will experience very few, possibly no, shocks from the fence, because they've been trained to back away from the boundary, and the shock is only there as an aid for a dog who forgot.
The model you post has "run through" protection which means if a dog approaches the boundary at speed he'll get massive, rapidly repeating shocks that will deter practically any dog, not the "brief single shock" some of the older models have that many dogs will happily run through without even noticing.

Our dogs would stop dead at the boundary even in full pursuit of deer, squirrels, cats, fox. They would stay in even without the collars on, and they stayed in during the two weeks the fence was off-line due to driveway construction.

We've had the wire partly buried and mostly just lying on the ground for close to ten years now and the only two times we've had a wire failure was once a tree fell on it and severed it, and once something decided to gnaw through it.

bambam
Aug. 2, 2010, 01:42 PM
It just depends on the dog and the training I think.
We had it for the family dog (Husky mix) and it was wonderful and worked for her for 13 years on several pieces of property. It was not feasible to put in physical fences and this allowed her to hang out outside, which she LOVED to do, without being on a leash.
She had a pretty good prey drive (chased, caught and killed most of the critters who came through the yard including, unfortunately, an entire skunk family over the course of one summer) but never once ran through the fence. The only time I ever felt bad about using it was when the cat would torture her by playing with her and then cross the line, stop and say "nah, nah, nah, nah, nah, nah" to the dog (I swear that is what that cat was clearly saying and he knew exactly how far the dog would go).
We trained her in a day and never saw fear issues. Eventually we stopped turning it on and then ultimately using the collar at all because she simply did not cross the line.
On the the other hand, I have known more than dog that would just blow through it. Again, I think it really depends on the dog. I have been told it generally does not work for northern breeds because of the combo of prey drive, thick fur and stubbornness, but it worked for our northern breed - shrug

Trevelyan96
Aug. 2, 2010, 05:04 PM
I have a hord core seriel escapee terrier mix. We bought the Pet Safe wireless radio fence system, and it works fantastic. I have one in the house and one in the tackroom in the barn.

You do have to do the training. My little guy pretty much figured it out the first day, but we did the full training cycle as recommended anyway.

The only issue I have is that he figured it out well enough that he knows as long as he's not wearing that specifice collar, he won't get zapped, so if I forget to put it on him when I go out the door, he's off as usual. Also, you can't store the transmitter long term in below freezing temps, so when we get a cold spell in winter, I lose my barn transmitter. :(

MistyBlue
Aug. 2, 2010, 07:14 PM
Lots of dogs do figure out Special Collar = Zaps and No Special Collar = Run Like Hell, I'm Free!!!! :lol: :eek: :lol:

Stinks if one slips out the door on you. And that's not the type of collar you want them wearing 24/7 in the house too.

Trev, have you tried a light box for your barn unit? Build a box large enoough for a light bulb and the unit, like folks do for hoses. Maybe that would work?

Does your barn unit and house unit overlap? That's neat, I'd never think of overlapping two units for a bigger territory.

msj
Aug. 2, 2010, 07:38 PM
And that's not the type of collar you want them wearing 24/7 in the house too.



I guess I'm just a bad dog owner as my girl and all my dogs for 20+ yrs have lived in their Invisible Fence collar 24/7.:( :( The only time my girl's collar comes off is when she gets a bath but she still has a regular collar and leash so it's not a problem. She has figured out, as the others did, just how to lie down and get the collar to shift so it's not digging into her neck when she sleeps.

I'm lucky in that I don't even have to take the collar off when I drive off the property OVER the wire that's been cut into the asphalt. I think the setting from warning to zap is a very small region, therefore the 4WD truck is just high enough that she doesn't get zapped.

katyb
Aug. 2, 2010, 08:16 PM
Ditto to the below. My two aussies understood the wireless petsafe on the first day of training. I have the younger dog on the lowest correction setting, and my older one is on beep only, because that is all she needs. My older girl loves her basketball and chases it with a passion, but when it rolls past the edge of the "fence", she doesn't chase it. I can ride my horse down the driveway, and the dogs stop at their boundary and wait. We have rabbits, squirrels, skunks, and foxes, and none of those entice my dogs out of the fence. I think the fact that the radio fence isn't a shock they can run through makes the difference. I have two units, so my dogs have almost an acre of freedom. I think it is the BEST!


Actually, I have an australian shepherd with a very strong prey drive. I have the radio fence that Misty describes and it works beautifully. He reacts exactly as Misty described when he went outside the area, which has been once. He has not become more aggressive toward people. He is very aware of the boundary and never crosses it. He can be in full flight chasing deer, he hears the beep of the collar and his butt hits the ground. I think good training to it is part of the secret. The reactions you describe sound like the owners never properly trained the dogs to the fence and so things went wrong. Any tool, used improperly can cause problems. I suspect this is doubly true when dealing with any type of electric collar.

MistyBlue
Aug. 2, 2010, 08:53 PM
Aw, I didn't mean it made anyone a bad owner.
I always took the collar off indoors because my dog had a 6" thick coat. In order to wear the collar so it was close enough to his neck to zap him, it had to be pretty tight through all that fuzz. And his had the huge zapper thing on it for the extra large dogs.

Here's what my Mal looked like wearing his collar:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/1207302752058690718UvSBQv?vhost=pets
Not comfy for him to wear all the time indoors. ;)
Other dogs could come into the yard, that's a neighbor's dog Tucker over for a visit. Kodiak and Tucker were buddies, it's the only dog Kodiak ever liked. (he was quite opinionated, LOL)
To give you an idea on Kodi's size, Tucker is just shy of 90 lbs. Kodi was 164 lbs in that photo and his summer shaved look was growing back in. This was early fall IIRC. He was even fluffier than that in winter:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/1212399374058690718STPXaK?vhost=pets
Believe it or not, he's wearing his zap collar in that photo too, LOL! You can just see the grey part of it under his chin, his coat usually hid it pretty well. :winkgrin:

Boy I miss that guy.

DefyingGravityEventing
Aug. 2, 2010, 10:01 PM
It keeps my Jack Russell on the property!

Training was the biggest part...she figured out that one little shock wasn't a big deal, so she got out several times. We cranked up the volume of the shock, and boy, she does not go near the barrier anymore. Doesn't matter if the neighbor's dog is out, deer in the woods, she runs up to the point where her collar starts the beeping warning and stops dead.

It was this or keep her tied up all day. I couldn't risk her getting in the road or wandering off. She passed dog obedience school, but forgets her lessons when there is a distraction around.

msj
Aug. 2, 2010, 10:31 PM
Aw, I didn't mean it made anyone a bad owner.
I always took the collar off indoors because my dog had a 6" thick coat. In order to wear the collar so it was close enough to his neck to zap him, it had to be pretty tight through all that fuzz. And his had the huge zapper thing on it for the extra large dogs.

Here's what my Mal looked like wearing his collar:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/1207302752058690718UvSBQv?vhost=pets
Not comfy for him to wear all the time indoors. ;)
Other dogs could come into the yard, that's a neighbor's dog Tucker over for a visit. Kodiak and Tucker were buddies, it's the only dog Kodiak ever liked. (he was quite opinionated, LOL)
To give you an idea on Kodi's size, Tucker is just shy of 90 lbs. Kodi was 164 lbs in that photo and his summer shaved look was growing back in. This was early fall IIRC. He was even fluffier than that in winter:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/1212399374058690718STPXaK?vhost=pets
Believe it or not, he's wearing his zap collar in that photo too, LOL! You can just see the grey part of it under his chin, his coat usually hid it pretty well. :winkgrin:

Boy I miss that guy.

MistyBlue, that is one gorgeous dog! I've never had one with anywhere near that heavy a coat. The only one that really was bad was the Aussie/Ridgeback mix and his coat wasn't long like an Aussie but shorter and thicker, more like the Australian Cattle dog /heeler that I have now.

I'm not upset about the comment about not wearing their collars 24/7 so don't worry. :) My first dog was a 24/7 outside dog. Even though he had a heated pad in the barn, with a dog door to get in and a straw bales made into an igloo so to say, he preferred to sleep on the manure pile (plenty of warmth coming from that) so he was NOT allowed in the house unless it was really bitter or a blizzard and then only in the mud room with the door closed. Second dog was outside all day with a blanket but in at night and she was a rottie/shepard cross so no really heavy coat like your Kodiak.

wendy
Aug. 3, 2010, 11:46 AM
Lots of dogs do figure out Special Collar = Zaps and No Special Collar = Run Like Hell, I'm Free!!!!


well, don't mean to point fingers? do I? but that is a problem created by people being stupid. Collar-wise dogs are created by people being stupid.
We very carefully did not create collar-wise dogs; by putting the "special" collars on and off at random, before the fence was activated, and after. So we ended up with dogs who respected the boundary and didn't connect it to wearing a special collar, which comes in handy at 5 am when you realize you just opened the door and forgot to put collars on the dogs and they are out there...

MistyBlue
Aug. 3, 2010, 01:56 PM
Ah, but it can go both ways. :)
It's also stupid to forget putting the collar on. It's like taking your dog for a walk and forgetting the leash. ;)

neversaynever
Aug. 3, 2010, 02:14 PM
I was also thinking about gettin a radio collar but did not know if it would work well in hilly areas. We are in E TN near the Smokies and the terrain is up and down - the house is on a flat area but slopes down pretty steeply on 3 sides.

SCM1959
Aug. 4, 2010, 11:55 AM
We recently installed the PetSafe invisible fence for Stubborn Dogs. We have had so much trouble! I am hoping some of you might have some suggestions.

We figured out where we wanted to lay the fence and the first thing we did was get the wire all laid out. We tested to be sure the fence was on and everything was working. Check.

Next, my husband carefully buried the wire, using one of those half-moon edger things. We tucked the wire in carefully. We tested the wire periodically to be sure everything was still working. Check.

When we finally buried the last length of wire, all the trouble started. A broken wire was indicated. We worked and worked and worked, trying to figure out where this could be. We went online and found some troubleshooting directions and followed them ... no definitive answer. In the meantime, our dog is still chained up and we feel terrible.

We eventually discovered that the transmitter was bad. We switched the transmitter out and eveyrthing seemed fine.

We started working training our dog and boy was he impressed with the fence! We looked forward to when we could finally let him off the leash or the chain. The day came and he was wonderful .... until he got to one point in the woods behind the house and whoosh -- he was gone. We found him several hours later and back on the chain he went. We tested the fence in that area and the charge is good and strong. The transmitter does not indicate any problem.

Coby respects the perimeter of the fence everywhere except for this one spot. Any ideas? The fence runs through a wooded area for a very long distance and he will not even go near the fence anywhere except for this place.

Help!

SCM1959

awaywego
Aug. 4, 2010, 04:12 PM
As soon as he's unsupervised, my lab is gone from the fully fenced, 2 acre yard. I have gone over and over the fence trying to find a hole, anything, but my only guess is that he's going OVER the split-rail/wire mesh fence. I hate keeping him tied up in the yard when I'm riding, so I have been thinking about a remote controlled shock collar to zap him with whenever he gets close the the existing fence. Has anyone done something like this?

Might be going out on a limb here, but guessing this is how this super sweet dog ended up at the SPCA to begin with...a perpetual runaway.

avezan
Aug. 5, 2010, 08:20 AM
I've had Invisible Fence brand and now DogWatch for nearly 20 years. It has worked very well at keeping our farm dogs from wandering off the farm. At our current place, the fence wire runs along our horse fence line, so it is just extra protection so that they won't find a place to go under or squeeze through the gate. I highly recommend getting the pros to install it and help train your dog correctly. SCM, your issue is something I would want to ask the pros. Sorry I don't have any other suggestions.

BEARCAT
Aug. 6, 2010, 06:10 PM
My fence got here today and I am a few feet short of wire (didn't realize I had to double it back from the house (transceiver). Is this something I can get at the hardware store?

kaluha2
Aug. 8, 2010, 09:28 PM
I am glad to see this thread. I have this puppy that some ass dropped off at my farm and after spending nearly $300 on shots/neutering/advantage/heartworm/mange shampoo,and antibiotics I guess I am now a dog owner, reluctently, but an owner nonetheless. He's a smart little guy but he chases the horses and when I ride he hangs off off my mares tail. Talk about pissing me off. LOL! I have tied him up and he chews through even the cables. He digs out of or goes over fencing. I have pretty well had it to say the least.

So, I am considering the Petsafe invisible fencing for this guy and hoping this will work otherwise I don't know what else to try.

I am interested in the invisible fence that does not have to be buried. I understand that it can be laid on the ground and works fine. What type is this? Does it really work well? Do you just lay it on the grass or does it have to be laid on gravel? Thanks

SCM1959
Aug. 9, 2010, 12:33 AM
UPDATE on my PetSafe for Stubborn Dogs fence ... Hooray, hooray, hooray, we finally have success!!!!

The solution was either one or all of the following:

1] Change the prongs on the collar to the long prongs

2] Put the warning charge on the transmitter to #4 (as per the directions for very lively dogs)

3] REMOVE his metal choke collar.

This third item was not mentioned anywhere in the instructions except during the part where it gave directions for training the dog to the fence. It kept saying to use a leash and a non-metal collar, blah, blah, blah.

Nowhere in the instructions did it say that the dog should not wear a metal collar in addition to the PetSafe collar. I did a search for metal choke collars and PetSafe collars and finally found something that said the metal on the extra collar could interfere with the signal from the fence!!!!

Coby has been outside several times today and he is VERY, VERY aware of his boundaries. It is wonderful!:D

witherbee
Aug. 9, 2010, 12:08 PM
Love our DogWatch Hidden Fence - have had it at 2 locations for over 15 years with 6 dogs (Rough Collie, 2 hound/lab mixes, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Golden Retriever and a Chihuahua) and it has been great. Currently we have about 8 or 9 pf our 10 acres covered and they love it. We have had breaks and it can get expensive, but worth it.

BEARCAT
Aug. 9, 2010, 12:17 PM
I am interested in the invisible fence that does not have to be buried. I understand that it can be laid on the ground and works fine. What type is this? Does it really work well? Do you just lay it on the grass or does it have to be laid on gravel? Thanks


Yes, I ordered the staples that allow you to just lay the fence on top of the ground - grass works great.

I am on day 3 of training and both dogs are starting to really get it.

kaluha2
Aug. 11, 2010, 07:20 PM
Thanks a heap Bearcat---that's the one I want to try on Scrappy. Which one did you buy? Thanks again

49'er
Aug. 11, 2010, 09:42 PM
I have the Petsafe fence hooked to my woven wire fence with electric fence staples and for the most part it works well with a JR and a Florida Brown Dog. But I do have a hard time keeping it working. I have to check the wire and connections and have replaced the transmitter once and the surge protector once. As of right now it is not working and I need to address the issue again as I have a new puppy. I love it when it is working.

bobbybradley53
Sep. 2, 2010, 05:36 PM
I've been thinking about buying a wireless fence from Havahart Wireless….it seems like it has a lot of great features that some of the less advanced fences don't have. It has a radius of 150 yards and can be set up and ready to train within a couple of hours. No digging! :)

DandyMatiz
Sep. 2, 2010, 06:05 PM
i think invisible fences are great.. inside a regular fence. I know some people who want to keep dogs out of garden areas, or out of a pool, or to keep them from going potty in the sandbax, etc. I don't trust them to contain a dog though. I've seen a lot get through them.. and it only takes one brief time.. like if the dog is out and gets scared of a storm and runs through it, or is chasing a rabbit (I have beagles.. so this is very likely), or for my belgian sheepdog... to go play with kids riding bikes down the road (she loves kids).. and they go through and realize the shock is minor and quick, and then they keep escaping.

katyb
Sep. 4, 2010, 08:48 AM
Well, with the wireless fence, the shock isn't quick. That's why I prefer it - there is a band of correction that is 30-40' wide, so they can't just run through and take the shock. That said, my dogs don't challenge the fence. One is on beep only, and the other is on the mildest shock. They are aussies, so smarter than the average pooch.

ManyDogs
Sep. 6, 2010, 08:33 AM
While we are fenced on most of our property, it is the neighbors' livestock fence and all of our dogs know where to go under it.
I, too hate(d) shock collars, but it was either that or keeping dogs inside most of the time. We have the wireless model. I put the flags up first but after a bit they were unneccessary. Not only do our dogs respect the line, they want the collars on! The JRT doesn't want it taken off! I can take the collars off and the dogs still respect the boundaries.
We have the collars set on beep only, and never had the collars much about 1 or 2. I can leave the dogs out as much as they like and not have to worry.

Link
Jul. 26, 2014, 02:06 PM
MistyBlue,

Would you mind explaining the difference to me between a in-ground wire shock fence and the radio shock fence. I can't seem to find the difference. My husband and I just purchased a 5 acre property which is only partly fenced. I am worried about my German Shepherd bolting through an electric fence. Would you mind haring what kind of brands you have been using and which one has worked best for you?

Thank you :)

AmarachAcres
Jul. 28, 2014, 05:21 PM
As a note to those who are worried their dogs figure out it doesn't work if they aren't collared, here is what worked for us.

We got an electric collar so that I could zap our dog every time she chased cattle. (Which worked, we only had to use it twice and never again. Electrified cattle!)

When we first got it, I only put it on her when we took her for a walk, to play fetch, to go to the dog park, etc... for two weeks. That collar meant good fun things.

By time we actually used it on her, she had NO idea that the warning beep or shock was due to the collar and still looked forward to it being placed on her every day.

She never chased cattle again, even when we stopped having her wear it.