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View Full Version : When is poison ivy dead enough?



Weighaton
Jul. 21, 2010, 01:52 PM
I just tore down an old greenhouse on our property. I drug it out to a clearing and burned it. No problems there. The original site of the greenhouse is covered in poison ivy and has a lot of debris (i.e. broken flower pots). I can't mow through there with the debris and I can't clean up the debris with the poison ivy there. What do I do now? If I spray the poison ivy with round up when I can get in there and clean up? I have horrible reactions to poison ivy so I really don't want to get it on me.

SGray
Jul. 21, 2010, 01:54 PM
roundup won't do it -- you need a poison designed for woody plants

twofatponies
Jul. 21, 2010, 02:02 PM
Be careful burning it! The smoke carries the poison and can get in your eyes and lungs...And the dead plants are still itch-inducing until they've rotted into oblivion, as far as I know.

Tom King
Jul. 21, 2010, 02:07 PM
I don't think it ever gets dry enough to not cause a reaction to those sensitive to it. We redid some chimneys on an 1828 house that had been covered in poison ivy vines. The owner remembered cutting them back in the '70s. They were dry and brittle, but the guys pulling them off, who said they weren't alergic to it, both got it bad between their fingers.

GallopHer
Jul. 21, 2010, 02:08 PM
The dead vines can excrete the irritating substance much longer than you think. Ask me how I know...

JSwan
Jul. 21, 2010, 02:08 PM
It's never dead enough. You could douse the stuff in napalm and it would still give you a freakin' rash.

Not that I know from personal experience or anything. ;)

Weighaton
Jul. 21, 2010, 02:15 PM
Round up makes a poison ivy formula that does make it brown and brittle.

So how do I get rid of it? Should I just cover myself and get it there and clean up the debris and then cut with the mower?

I remember you all talking about the smoke from burning poison ivy so we stayed away from the burning building. Now it is just a smoldering pile that I need to clean up.

twofatponies
Jul. 21, 2010, 02:20 PM
Round up makes a poison ivy formula that does make it brown and brittle.

So how do I get rid of it? Should I just cover myself and get it there and clean up the debris and then cut with the mower?

I remember you all talking about the smoke from burning poison ivy so we stayed away from the burning building. Now it is just a smoldering pile that I need to clean up.

Maybe get some of those disposable coveralls like chemical workers wear?

SGray
Jul. 21, 2010, 02:41 PM
plant expert was on NPR to talk about pi -- said if you get it in your skin you have ~8 minutes or less to wash it off -- after that it will have been absorbed (just an fyi)

GallopHer
Jul. 21, 2010, 02:52 PM
Just be careful - if you cover your body and hands - that you don't inadvertently wipe your hair out of your face or scratch your nose. Again, ask me how I know...

lil'redbarn
Jul. 21, 2010, 03:38 PM
This is pretty timely as just last night I called my dad up to the barn I board at to confirm that what the horses were eating was indeed poison ivy. From a distance I had assumed it was abadoned grapevine. However, upon closer inspection it had grown into a tree shape and in a few other areas along the fence it looked espaliered :) I'm familiar with its growth pattern in woodsy areas, but this took me aback a little.

Although I am not seeing any ill effects, I am uneasy with the fact that the horses are ingesting this plant. Can anyone point me to information regarding it's toxicity in horses? TIA!

ETA: A three second google search led me to the following article http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=5230. Apparently I should be searching for a few goats to lease :)

wendy
Jul. 21, 2010, 03:55 PM
I suggest renting? stealing? one of those spacesuit-like biohazard suits with helmet and air supply for the cleanup. Dead, alive, it doesn't matter, the oils still remain. Plus that roundup poison ivy killer doesn't really work; the stuff will come back to life six months later.

cllane1
Jul. 21, 2010, 04:47 PM
Any chance you could bushhog the area instead of mow it? That might break up the old pot debris better and do less damage to your mower. Plus, in a tractor, you'd be higher up out of reach of the PI. Then maybe once it's bushhogged, you could go about eradicating the PI?

Twiliath
Jul. 21, 2010, 06:50 PM
I have taken concentrated Round Up undiluted and poured on the stumps. That seems to have killed the PI that was covering my barn.

As to totally getting rid of it, put on gloves, use Ivy Block, dig it up and put it in plastic bags and throw away. Then have someone ready to clean up the handle of the shovel and open the doors for you to go in and clean off. If you're lucky, you can strip in the laundry room and run nekkid to the shower to use TecNu to wash with.

Weighaton
Jul. 21, 2010, 07:12 PM
So I can grab the vines by the root and pull them up? I have plenty of garbage bags. Is that the best solution? I can even throw away any old clothes that I am wearing.

Just as an aside - I can run nekkid through my house whenever I want but I may mentally scar my children for life.

blaster
Jul. 21, 2010, 07:24 PM
I've had great success killing poison ivy with this stuff:
http://agrisupply.com/wise-up-plus-glyphosphate-herbicide/p/50135/c2p/hp/

8 oz per 5 gallons in the back pack sprayer with no raining for 2-3 days. Wait 2-3 weeks. You need to spray the leaves to kill the roots. It will shrivel up and turn brown. It will be much easier to deal with.

As stated above, you can still get rash--but I've had great success clearing after it is dead.

Chall
Jul. 21, 2010, 08:43 PM
Dont forget goggles! I got it even though I had on a plastic apron, gloves, those huge black garbage bags, one on each arm OVER the gloves and attached at the top of my arm with rubberbands, goggles and a breathing mask.
Yup still got it.
You don't burn it because your throat and lungs can close up in allergic reaction! Egads.

DressageFancy
Jul. 21, 2010, 08:49 PM
This is pretty timely as just last night I called my dad up to the barn I board at to confirm that what the horses were eating was indeed poison ivy. From a distance I had assumed it was abadoned grapevine. However, upon closer inspection it had grown into a tree shape and in a few other areas along the fence it looked espaliered :) I'm familiar with its growth pattern in woodsy areas, but this took me aback a little.

Although I am not seeing any ill effects, I am uneasy with the fact that the horses are ingesting this plant. Can anyone point me to information regarding it's toxicity in horses? TIA!

ETA: A three second google search led me to the following article http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=5230. Apparently I should be searching for a few goats to lease :)

Way back when I first started raising dairy goats someone gave me a book titled "Never Kiss A Goat On The Lips". I've ofter thought about that book when I observe my horses eating poison ivy!

SmplySweet1021
Jul. 21, 2010, 08:57 PM
I'm highly allergic to it and my mom when I was younger would take bread bags and put them on to pull the Poison Ivy out. They were great because you already had them and they reach up high on your arm. Have a trash bag ready to dump everything in. :-)

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Jul. 21, 2010, 08:58 PM
Gah. I've got the stuff crawling back up my side porch columns, from an old vine I thought I killed years ago. Apparently it was only slumbering. :uhoh:

But since the last great poison ivy slaughter, I fenced in my front and side yards and now the dogs have access to it. So I'm afraid to use poison on it.

Can anyone recommend a canine-safe herbicide for poison ivy?

SmplySweet1021
Jul. 21, 2010, 11:05 PM
The biggest thing about poison ivy is you need to pull everything out....roots and all. Otherwise it will keep coming back.

jwright
Jul. 21, 2010, 11:11 PM
wear a jumpsuit that covers all your body parts just to be sure.

Bobuddy
Jul. 21, 2010, 11:15 PM
I work in the medical field - I usually steal surgical gowns and gloves, mask, etc. and then go to town.

Some of the worst poison ivy cases I have ever seen -

1) poison ivy baled in hay

2) poison ivy burned - inhaled and guy spent time in the hospital for swelling and lung problems

3) patient that wanted to have a dinner party with a "wine" theme. So, she went outside - mind you, this is in the dead of winter - and cut vines to bring them in. Yes.... they were poison ivy vines. That was months getting rid of it for her.

wlrottge
Jul. 22, 2010, 03:43 PM
I've had great success killing poison ivy with this stuff:
http://agrisupply.com/wise-up-plus-glyphosphate-herbicide/p/50135/c2p/hp/

8 oz per 5 gallons in the back pack sprayer with no raining for 2-3 days. Wait 2-3 weeks. You need to spray the leaves to kill the roots. It will shrivel up and turn brown. It will be much easier to deal with.

That's the same stuff as Roundup (Glyphomate). None-selective, systemic herbicide.

I worked with our entemologist on a community service project a couple of weeks ago regarding herbicide usage.

Glyphomate is systemic, spray the leaves, kill the roots... if you do it right. Per him (a licensed applicator with a LOT of experience in integrated pest management); he recomends using a 2-3% mixture on poison ivy. For the 41% glyphomate that means 2 2/3 - 6 1/2 oz of herbicide per gallon of water.

wildlifer
Jul. 22, 2010, 06:48 PM
It's never dead enough -- I get horrible reactions to it too. Nothing kills it and increased carbon levels in the atmosphere make it grow bigger faster. Yay.

subk
Jul. 22, 2010, 09:22 PM
The urushiol oil is in the wood whether the plant is living or not. Some woods other than PI, like ginkgo, have trace amounts of urushiol. If you are allergic you shouldn't wear wood jewelry of unknown origin next to your skin. Ask me how I know this...

The PI washes now available have mineral spirits as their active ingredient. Makes sense--if you want to clean up oil based paints that's what you use. I keep some mineral spirits at the barn and if I think I've come in contact wipe it on the area then wash it off really well with soap and water. The oil can and will stay on your skin for days--soap and water doesn't get it off. If it's been a while since exposure--even to the point you are breaking out--you should still suspect the oil in still on your skin and use the mineral spirits to clean it off.

anchodavis
Jul. 22, 2010, 09:31 PM
Roundup is supposed to be safe for critters and people. The property we bought a couple years back and are now trying to tame is rife with poison ivy. I'm not sure what to do about it, except be grateful that horses don't seem to take issue with it...