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View Full Version : How did you do your washrack drain? HELP!



mpsbarnmanager
Jul. 20, 2010, 04:20 PM
Hi,

I am building a new barn and my younger brother is doing the plumbing. He is a plumber by trade. I expressed to him how important it is that the washrack drains (I will have 2) do not clog, EVER. He thinks that having a 4'' pipe going down into a 12'' square plastic catch basin, then out into a "huge" drywell filled with small cinder block peices rather than paying for rock will do the job just great. I'm a little septical.

The other runoff option is that we have a ditch near one end of the barn, but to trench it out to the ditch on a slope (as it needs to be, obvi), the pipe will come out just under the ditch. So we could dig the dich out a bit, I think that is the better option, but he IS the plumber here. The ditch is about 60 feet from the back wall of the wash stall.

One WR is across the isle fron the other, so the pipe for that drain would be under the concrete isle and pick up the other WR drain, and go wherever it will end up being piped to.

Any thoughts, ideas or suggestions?? Plesae help me decide!!

Thanks!!:)

Pennywell Bay
Jul. 20, 2010, 04:30 PM
Actually, your township should tell you what needs to be done. There are usually zoning issues to deal with that.
Depending on your specs of course.

skyy
Jul. 20, 2010, 07:00 PM
Sadly, I have no useful information for you but I had to chuckle when I read that you were "septical"! Was that a little bit of plumbing humor?

A question though. By 12" catch basin, do you mean something that you can physically clean out? We manage a to hose off a staggering amount of mud from our horses and if we had a real wash stall with a real drain I think we'd be in for a huge problem when all the mud settled.

ASB Stars
Jul. 20, 2010, 07:25 PM
The essential issue is having enough fall, from the wash stall, to the drain area. You need to be sure that the water, etc. will keep enough velocity to drain completely.

Ask me how I know? :lol:

baysngreys
Jul. 20, 2010, 07:31 PM
Hi,

I am building a new barn and my younger brother is doing the plumbing. He is a plumber by trade. I expressed to him how important it is that the washrack drains (I will have 2) do not clog, EVER. He thinks that having a 4'' pipe going down into a 12'' square plastic catch basin,

That's how mine was in a previous barn. The catch basin will need to be cleaned out occassionally but it prevents a ton of goop clogging up a septic or drain field.
It worked fine for me - 4 horses, but I sold it to a trainer - 10+ horses and it clogged up. She had to dig a new drain field.

Depends on how much use it will get.

Tom King
Jul. 20, 2010, 09:17 PM
No catch basin and no dry well. 4" pipe straight out, after one large radius elbow, to daylight somewhere downhill and out of the way.

deltawave
Jul. 20, 2010, 09:46 PM
Drain is on the SIDE of the wash stall, not in the center. (Bonnie is convinced the Loch Ness Monster lives in drains) :rolleyes: Pipe is currently not attached to anything :P because my "wash stall" has never been used as such and is currently a "hay storage area". I wash the horses outside, tied to my trailer. But if I were to hook it up, there's a pipe that drains from the sink in the tack room to the small creek on our property. I am very careful to not dump anything in there except water and modest amounts of natural or organic soap. Another reason I'm sort of glad my "wash stall" is not acting as it was intended. ;)

mpsbarnmanager
Jul. 20, 2010, 11:26 PM
Sadly, I have no useful information for you but I had to chuckle when I read that you were "septical"! Was that a little bit of plumbing humor?

A question though. By 12" catch basin, do you mean something that you can physically clean out? We manage a to hose off a staggering amount of mud from our horses and if we had a real wash stall with a real drain I think we'd be in for a huge problem when all the mud settled.

Haha I meant "skeptical"! lol:

Yes, the catch basin is a plastic square that has a removable cap. You can go in and clean out sediment when needed. I'm afraid if I just pipe it out the pipe could clog due to lazy boarders washing poop down the drain. But I'm told a 4" pipe is very large for this application. Thanks everyone!! :)

inquisitive
Jul. 21, 2010, 10:20 AM
Drain is on the SIDE of the wash stall, not in the center. (Bonnie is convinced the Loch Ness Monster lives in drains) :rolleyes: Pipe is currently not attached to anything :P because my "wash stall" has never been used as such and is currently a "hay storage area". I wash the horses outside, tied to my trailer. But if I were to hook it up, there's a pipe that drains from the sink in the tack room to the small creek on our property. I am very careful to not dump anything in there except water and modest amounts of natural or organic soap. Another reason I'm sort of glad my "wash stall" is not acting as it was intended. ;)

We do this too ;)

There is a drain in the center, with a grate. The grate lifts up, and in the bottom is a big container that you would periodically lift out and dump into the trash. There is a pipe that goes out a couple inches above the bottom of the pan (so in theory the water goes down, the silt and junk sits in the pan, it fills up with water, and then only water goes out. The pipe would just go out the hillside surrounded by rocks...

But again, we don't "use" our "washstall" :D

Benson
Jul. 21, 2010, 11:52 AM
I was visiting a barn the other day that had a pool filter of some sort that she cleans periodically. THere are 11 horses using the wash stall daily and she says she has not problems. I don't know the specifics of setup.

wildlifer
Jul. 21, 2010, 12:04 PM
We don't have a drain -- the washrack just slopes towards the wall slightly, then drains outside to run away from the barn through a hole in the bottom of the wall.

AnotherRound
Jul. 21, 2010, 01:50 PM
Well we have some of the drain problems talked about here, and I think if there was something like a pool filter around the drain it would help immensly, as then the gunk could be cleaned up after each horse.

Edited to add: This would work best if the drain was in a corner, as ours is.

CatOnLap
Jul. 21, 2010, 02:03 PM
The essential issue is having enough fall, from the wash stall, to the drain area. You need to be sure that the water, etc. will keep enough velocity to drain completely.
This.

We have a 4 inch pipe that falls about 2 feet during a 60 foot straight run under the barn and out into a forest hillside where the water actually helps the trees. In 15 years still running free and clear. The pipe was laid and tested before we poured the concrete for the barn aisle. There is no mud trap or catch basin, which in our climate always becomes a stinking mess that breeds mosquitoes unless you physically remove and clean it daily.

Tom King
Jul. 21, 2010, 03:03 PM
This.

We have a 4 inch pipe that falls about 2 feet during a 60 foot straight run under the barn and out into a forest hillside where the water actually helps the trees. In 15 years still running free and clear. The pipe was laid and tested before we poured the concrete for the barn aisle. There is no mud trap or catch basin, which in our climate always becomes a stinking mess that breeds mosquitoes unless you physically remove and clean it daily.

That's what I was talking about. Ideally, any plumbing drain pipes only need to slope about 1/8 to 1/4" a foot so the solids don't separate from the liquid. Ours is about the same setup and it has been trouble free for 30 years-nothing to clean out, nothing to bother will. Just wash everything down the drain and it's no different than what's already on the ground out in the pastures.

betsyk
Jul. 21, 2010, 04:06 PM
Make sure the water drains out and away quickly enough that it won't freeze in winter. Where I board, the drain freezes, making the washrack into a skating rink for months. Then when it thaws, it floods the bathroom because the bathroom floor drain freezes, too.

Rayman421
Jul. 22, 2010, 12:49 AM
The best wash stall drain I ever saw was in a barn in Va. The floor sloped slightly to the back wall of the barn and the water drained directly outside to the same place under the gutters that the rainwater would. Because the way the floor sloped and that fact that there was no piping it never clogged and it wasn't too cold either- there was no huge gap in the floor- you couldn't tell there was any gap at all until you were standing right next to it. The wash stall was located in the middle of the barn and did not freeze up except in the worst winters when everything froze anyway. I think if we had installed heat lamps it wouldn't have frozen at all.

If I ever build a barn, that is the kind of drain system I will have. I have yet to see a wash stall drain that did NOT get stopped up.

CatOnLap
Jul. 23, 2010, 01:24 PM
I have yet to see a wash stall drain that did NOT get stopped up.

:winkgrin: You are welcome to come and look at ours, if it turns your crank! 15 years and never clogged, despite regular ( sometimes daily) washing of horses, even in shedding season. Of course, we do not try and wash our entire poop production down the drain.

pn
Jul. 23, 2010, 01:37 PM
Due to VERY lazy boarders flushing not sweeping, I have cut window screening to fit under the mat covering the drain. It fills quickly but has totally prevented the stuff they rinse down the drain from going down. We have to rinse it daily,but have had to have the septic flushed twice in six months so it has solved my problem.

rwfarm
Jul. 23, 2010, 02:21 PM
Our drain is in the middle of the floor. There is a basket inside the drain, under the typical medal lid. The sediment hair etc stays in basket. Water flows through. Basket comes out easily for cleaning. Works great.

coco21
Jul. 23, 2010, 03:55 PM
I don't have a drain in the wash stall either. And I'm very happy I didn't put one in! Every barn I've ever been in has had clogged drains.
I also had the concrete sloped toward the back off the stall where there is a 3-4" opening that runs the length of the wall and drains out the back of the barn. I have turned that area into a vegetable garden. All the water and muck runs out the back, fertilizing and watering the vegi's! it's a great situation!

mpsbarnmanager
Jul. 23, 2010, 05:00 PM
RWfarm, that is almost exactly what I am planning to do, glad to hear it works for you. Our site is totally flat, so I will have to have it piped someplace. I wish I could drill a hole in the wall, sounds SO maintenence free! Thanks for the tips on the slopes, I did not know solids and liquids would separate in the drain! Thanks again everyone, HUGE help!!