PDA

View Full Version : Ticks: Ultimate Solution to Remove Them Intact



Adamantane
Jul. 14, 2010, 07:38 PM
I have collected enough data now. This works for big fat dog ticks and smaller deer ticks, including those who have been latched on for 24 hours.

Every time I have tried it, it succeeded. Not just on me, but on other people. Not just on flat areas like arms and thighs, but in narrower more sensitive ones.

(I haven't tried it on companion critters or horses yet.)

Nothing I ever had tried before -- rubbing alcohol, finger nail polish remover (ethyl acetate), varnish, paint thinner, gasoline, acetone, turpentine, lighter fluid, 100-proof vodka, hot tweezers, cold tweezers, detergent, lighters, matches, you-name-it -- ever before worked not even once.

I want to hear back if this does NOT work for you.

Instructions:

Obtain some Everclear (95%, 190 proof ethyl alcohol) and either a narrow shot glass or better, something maybe a half-inch across into which you can put a quarter inch deep pool of Everclear. The ones I've used have been transparent, but a big clean dry 1/2" wide flat-edged/bottomed plastic bottlecap should work.



Be sure there is no water in the container -- if there is, dry it out and rinse it out first with some Everclear that you discard to make certain there is nothing but undiluted Everclear in the container. (If water gets into the Everclear and dilutes it, even a little, likely this won't work.)

Pour Everclear into the small container or cap. Better too much than too little. Half an ounce should be [I]more than enough.

Place the container containing the Everclear against the area of skin where the tick is attached. (This may mean having someone help you if the tick is on you and you can't reach to hold the liquid in place, or it is awkwardly situated.)

Invert the container so that the liquid totally covers and continues to cover the tick against the skin, and does not leak out while you're holding it against the skin.

Hold the container in place for ten minutes without letting the Everclear leak out. (For small deer ticks this might not need to be all of ten minutes, but go with ten minutes.) If the tick is on a hairy spot like your head or neck where the liquid slowly leaks out, you may need to use enough Everclear so that the tick stays submerged the whole time.

After ten minutes of continuous tick submersion, remove the container, exposing the tick.

Probably you can now just brush the tick off. Possibly you may need to grasp it lightly with your fingertips. At worse, you may need to attach tweezers lightly to the tick near its head and give the very slightest of tugs.

The tick will release without much effort. It's mouth parts and head will not remain embedded. The tick may even start wandering around on your skin.

Save or discard the tick as you prefer.

If it's been embedded a long time, you will see a little indentation/mark on the skin where the critter was clamped in before letting go.

Probably the alcohol will have done much to disinfect the former attachment site, but there's no guarantee that if the tick was infectious that the site might not become infected, so treat it as you would any other tick bite after the tick is gone (with or without its head and mouth).

Discard the used Everclear. Your skin should be just fine.

The tick no doubt felt no pain.

If for some reason the tick didn't release as all the others have so far, repeat the process for another ten minutes.

Do not substitute anything else for the Everclear. Even 151 proof rum doesn't have sufficient concentration of alcohol. It's possible that 90% isopropanol [rubbing alcohol] does, but normally the strongest version sold is 70% which does not work.

kinnip
Jul. 14, 2010, 07:44 PM
Nice, but I'm more likely to down the liquor myself then pinch the tick off.

callmegold
Jul. 14, 2010, 07:48 PM
I vote a shot of good whiskey, and save the Everclear for the tick.

Adamantane
Jul. 14, 2010, 07:57 PM
I like alcoholic beverages but I'd much rather drink whiskey and use the Everclear to get excess water out of gas lines in my garden tractor or jet ski if there's nothing else handy to do that.:D

hundredacres
Jul. 14, 2010, 08:14 PM
I just pull 'em off. Never had a problem!

shakeytails
Jul. 14, 2010, 09:43 PM
I just pull 'em off. Never had a problem!

Me too. Then I like to make them blow up like popcorn by holding a lighter flame to them (insert evil grin).

If I buy alcohol- it's gonna be something worth drinking!

Ghazzu
Jul. 14, 2010, 09:46 PM
Who on earth has a pain threshold so low they need to go through all that BS?
Pull the damn thing off and drink the alcohol.

MistyBlue
Jul. 14, 2010, 09:57 PM
It probably works because ticks breathe through their "skin." (exoskeleton)
If you want to wait 10 minutes, just cover the tick firmly with a piece of tape. Masking or duct works well. Wait 10 minutes, remove tape and tick with all parts should come with it. Now just fold the tape and toss out, the tick cannot resurrect itself covered in tape. :winkgrin:
Or just pinch it out. Then stick it to a piece of tape.

columbus
Jul. 14, 2010, 11:19 PM
The problem with squeezing them and or pulling them off is then they will barf into the wound. Ticks are far to dangerous to have them depositing tick spit in their chew hole.

The best ways for removing ticks is the way most likely to prevent this.

Then there is the problem with their head encysting if it is left behind when the body is pulled off.

The tick pullers depend on getting the grip of the tick at the entry into the skin and then NOT gripping the ticks body...the pull is of the head and mouth parts. Unlike fingers might grip as they pull on the body...squeezing as they pull. It is really important to not inject a nice dose of tick spit which is loaded with spirochetes and bacteria for some really unpleasant diseases.

I don't know if the everclear method prevents ticks barfing. Seems ok to me. PatO

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 12:02 AM
Any idiot can just rip an embedded tick out. :rolleyes: And apparently some do.

You can extract a tooth with determination and pliers or amputate a finger with a meat cleaver, too. Not very scientific but in a crude sort of way it'll do the job, at least in the short term. Someone in the US Army during WWII stationed in the rural Philippines swears they'd break horses with two-by-fours, too. :yes:

The problem is leaving a tick head/mouth buried for days with increased risk of tick-borne or other infection, plus days with an sore welt.

None of the other approaches have work reliably for me or anyone else around here I know.

Took many experiments but this one does.

citydog
Jul. 15, 2010, 12:19 AM
:rolleyes:

It's easy enough to grab their heads with tweezers and pull them out all in one piece with no embedded parts and without squeezing their contents back into your own (or your critter's).

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 12:28 AM
:rolleyes:

It's easy enough to grab their heads with tweezers and pull them out all in one piece with no embedded parts and without squeezing their contents back into your own (or your critter's).

With such dexterity you have a bright future awaiting you in the healthcare profession. :yes:

The rest of us who aren't so gifted need to rely on inducing their cheerful cooperation.

Think of it as a partnership between rider and tick facilitated by alcohol.:D Now if I could only knock a couple back with my horse and come to the same understanding.

HighFlyinBey++
Jul. 15, 2010, 06:54 AM
Yay! I'm a dexterous idiot!

A) I'm not waiting one extra second to get that icky thing off of me

B) If we're going to ascribe human emotions to parasitic insects, then I vote for a causing a split second of pain vs. 10 minutes of terror while it slowly drowns in a miniature vat of booze.

Dad Said Not To
Jul. 15, 2010, 06:57 AM
According to the CDC, the best way to remove a tick is with tweezers or a tick extractor. If the mouth parts break off in the skin, they're easy to remove the same way you'd remove a shallow splinter-- no need to "leave (it) buried for days". If you're too squeamish to remove mouth parts from your skin, it won't increase the risk of tick-borne infections, as the bacteria are carried in the tick's gut. The entire head can't break off in the skin, because ticks don't bury their heads to feed.
From the CDC's website:
Folklore remedies, such as the use of petroleum jelly or hot matches, do little to encourage a tick to detach from skin. In fact, they may make matters worse by irritating the tick and stimulating it to release additional saliva or regurgitate gut contents, increasing the chances of transmitting the pathogen. These methods of tick removal should be avoided.

saje
Jul. 15, 2010, 07:43 AM
I just soak them with fly spray if they are in unreachable areas of horseflesh and they drop off w/in 1/2 an hour.

On the dogs I'll either douse them in spray also, or pull them.

On me, I pull the suckers and shudder....

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:01 AM
B) If we're going to ascribe human emotions to parasitic insects, then I vote for a causing a split second of pain vs. 10 minutes of terror while it slowly drowns in a miniature vat of booze.

My joke about cooperation aside, I don't give a rat's ass about how the tick feels. (If there any Jainists out there, since the ticks come out of this alive and crawling, at least until you squash them dead afterward, the Everclear approach seems better.)

CDC is right that the 'folk remedies' don't seem to work, at least not for me or my friends.

Which was the driver to experiment for a few years until I worked this out.

Rinsing a big cotton ball in 95% ethanol and sticking it on with a big piece of tape or some vet wrap for ten minutes ought to accomplish the same thing, but I haven't collected data yet. (That would have the advantage of working for ticks in hard to reach places such as the belly of a critter.)

AKB
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:04 AM
Read the CDC website. Just remove the tick with tweezers. Don't torture the tick with various substances before you try to remove it. They are more likely to spit infectious substances into you if you torture them instead of just pulling them off. My experience, after pulling off many, many, ticks at work, is that they break apart much more easily if they are dead or have been tortured. Then, the head is left in place, which can be annoying (as well hard to remove if it bothers you).

If I don't have tweezers, and I am not at work, I just pull of the tick with my hand and wash my hands afterwards. With the very tiny deer ticks, it is easier to use tweezers.

If a deer tick has been on you for more than 24 hours and is fat/engorged, some people will prescribe a 200mg dose of doxycycline if you are in a Lyme endemic area. Otherwise, you just need to watch for rashes, fevers, or flu like symptoms in the next weeks.

HighFlyinBey++
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:06 AM
My apologies for failing to grasp that your thread title was a joke


Ticks: Ultimate Solution to Remove Them Intact Without Pain

Or was the "without pain" part referring to human pain? I haven't finished my coffee oh crap, now I'm late for work!

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:12 AM
My apologies for failing to grasp that your thread title was a joke



Or was the "without pain" part referring to human pain? I haven't finished my coffee oh crap, now I'm late for work!

Human. Over the next few days, not instantly while yanking it off the old fashioned way. That last is no worse than yanking off a bandaid.

I'll tweak the title if I can think so something.

But those ticks are feeling no pain.:lol: I don't recommend drinking the Everclear afterward though it probably kills any microbes.:winkgrin:

SmartAlex
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:39 AM
What proof Everclear was this? Because, unfortunately, even in some of the very few states where you could still buy it the governments have determined that humans are unable to handle the responsibility of 190 proof anymore, and you can only get then 151 proof. :mad:

Tom King
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:50 AM
If I took ten minutes to pull every tick off that I have pulled off, I would be missing a year of my life.

Fingers work just fine. Just don't pull too hard and fast and they will turn loose.

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:52 AM
Aren't governments wonderful? What would we ever do without their vigilant protection?:sadsmile:

This is 190 proof. I think it is key to have the high concentration. I tried 151 proof rum once. Didn't unlatch the suckers, though I didn't time how long I tried.

Not sure whether that is due to the 'dehydrating' effect or superior lipophilicity. I'm pretty confident that 90% or 100% isopropanol would work, especially if lipophilicity is what's in play, but what's usually supplied is only 70%, which is pretty much the same story as 151 proof booze. I'd be wary of methanol (wood alcohol).

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:59 AM
If I took ten minutes to pull every tick off that I have pulled off, I would be missing a year of my life.

Fingers work just fine. Just don't pull too hard and fast and they will turn loose.

You and several people here seem to have uncanny luck getting the buggers to cooperate.

I agree it's a pain to hold the thing in place for ten minutes, but that's all the data I have so far.

Didn't want to deny the world the benefit of the only thing that actually works until I'd gotten past the proof of concept stage.

Trying the cotton ball sopped in Everclear and stuck on with tape or vet wrap is the next thing I'll play with. No obvious reason why it shouldn't work, too.

KayBee
Jul. 15, 2010, 11:46 AM
Read the CDC website. Just remove the tick with tweezers. Don't torture the tick with various substances before you try to remove it. They are more likely to spit infectious substances into you if you torture them instead of just pulling them off. My experience, after pulling off many, many, ticks at work, is that they break apart much more easily if they are dead or have been tortured. Then, the head is left in place, which can be annoying (as well hard to remove if it bothers you).

If I don't have tweezers, and I am not at work, I just pull of the tick with my hand and wash my hands afterwards. With the very tiny deer ticks, it is easier to use tweezers.

If a deer tick has been on you for more than 24 hours and is fat/engorged, some people will prescribe a 200mg dose of doxycycline if you are in a Lyme endemic area. Otherwise, you just need to watch for rashes, fevers, or flu like symptoms in the next weeks.

I've tried the tweezers, and 7 out of 10 times, I can get it out no problem. The other 3 times, no luck. And we have a TON of ticks in Litchfield County, CT.

1ofEach
Jul. 15, 2010, 12:25 PM
Works they same way as what MistyBlue said, but instead use Olive Oil. A couple drops massaged into a dog's ears is also supposed to kill ear mites, but I haven't tried that one yet.

Ghazzu
Jul. 15, 2010, 12:53 PM
Didn't want to deny the world the benefit of the only thing that actually works until I'd gotten past the proof of concept stage.

.

But the number of replies you've gotten clearly indicate that it *isn't* the "only thing that actually works"...

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 01:15 PM
Clearly some folks have talents denied me and all my friends in NC.

More power to them.

What's with the sour grapes, Ghazzu? Sorry you didn't figure it out first?:lol:

All I can say is that this particular approach has never yet failed, not to say that it can't, I suppose.

The little suckers unlatch and stagger away (if you let them), or at least the dog ticks do. As for deer ticks, no movement detected. Dead drunk so to speak?

Ghazzu
Jul. 15, 2010, 01:51 PM
Riiight.
Sure you haven't been doing more with the Everclear than drowning ticks?

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 02:03 PM
Riiight.
Sure you haven't been doing more with the Everclear than drowning ticks?

Well, sometimes I use it to pull water into solution in the gas tank on my jet ski or garden tractor. Which is what I had been doing when I first got the idea to try this.

Generally what I drink is bourbon. Way too early in the day for me. How about you?

mp
Jul. 15, 2010, 02:33 PM
All I can say is that this particular approach has never yet failed

Shooting the tick in the ass with a .22 wouldn't fail either. But that approach would also be overkill.

Removal by tweezer or fingers works fine for me. YMMD.

Guilherme
Jul. 15, 2010, 02:48 PM
Flip the tick over on its back before trying to remove it and the job is a lot easier.

Then kill the little bastard.

G.

scheherazadetbmare
Jul. 15, 2010, 02:54 PM
I grew up with ticks on me and on dogs, so I learned as a child how to remove them with my fingers w/o leaving those annoying and painful heads in the skin.

You can apply fingernail polish remover to make them easier to take off, but if you have been taught by your parents as a child, it's ingrained. Just pull tick away from the skin and then pull it off and treat with something to lessen the soreness.

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 03:02 PM
Shooting the tick in the ass with a .22 wouldn't fail either. But that approach would also be overkill.

Removal by tweezer or fingers works fine for me. YMMD.

Why limit yourself to a .22?

Shooting the tick in the ass probably would fail to remove the head and mouth unless the shot simultaneously blew away the flesh where the tick had chomped down, so I'd go for a .44 to be sure nothing accidentally remains behind.:yes:

No doubt overkill but still in line with Ghazzu's damn-the-torpedoes just-rip-the-tick-apart school of thought.:winkgrin:

With this approach it probably still would be a good plan to have some kind of booze handy for afterward.

And if you try this method to remove a tick attached to a horse, maybe a lot more than booze.:lol:

Ghazzu
Jul. 15, 2010, 05:43 PM
Generally what I drink is bourbon. Way too early in the day for me. How about you?


Laphroaig, if you're buying :D.

Ghazzu
Jul. 15, 2010, 05:45 PM
No doubt overkill but still in line with Ghazzu's damn-the-torpedoes just-rip-the-tick-apart school of thought.:winkgrin:



Torpedos would also be overkill.

I don't rip it apart.
I remove it intact most of the time.
Sometimes clutching a tiny piece of epidermis in its little jaws.

Tamara in TN
Jul. 15, 2010, 05:47 PM
Laphroaig, if you're buying :D.

your not a cheap date are you ? ;) I prefer peach schnapps in the summer,barenjager in the winter,cazadores for parties and
muscadine white for every day use

I would never however waste (even) Everclear on a bug:)

Tamara in Tn

pmysliwski
Jul. 15, 2010, 06:06 PM
Yay! I'm a dexterous idiot!

A) I'm not waiting one extra second to get that icky thing off of me

B) If we're going to ascribe human emotions to parasitic insects, then I vote for a causing a split second of pain vs. 10 minutes of terror while it slowly drowns in a miniature vat of booze.

This! Ticks are just wrong.

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 07:01 PM
Pull the damn thing off and drink the alcohol.

'Pull the damn thing off' isn't quite the same as 'removing it intact most of the time' which sounds a little less wild-ass, even when it's 'clutching a tiny piece of epidermis in its jaws.'

Bet you don't do that with pliers or a cleaver.:no:

As for the Laphroaig, is that a true requirement or will undiluted grain alcohol do when nothing else is available?:confused:

My single malt choice is normally a mid-range Macallan -- JWB is fine as a blend --but I really prefer Maker's Mark.

If you work your way back into character as a respected COTH vet, do we buy you a pony of Everclear with a beer wash, or something else?

(If a .44 riles the patient or the herd, I hate to guess what a torpedo in the pond might do.:eek:)

Ghazzu
Jul. 15, 2010, 07:41 PM
Bet you don't do that with pliers or a cleaver.:no:


No tools required.



As for the Laphroaig, is that a true requirement or will undiluted grain alcohol do when nothing else is available?:confused:


Not required. Preferred.



If you work your way back into character as a respected COTH vet, do we buy you a pony of Everclear with a beer wash, or something else?


Wachusett Summer Ale with blueberries will do fine for the chaser.

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 07:59 PM
Wachusett Summer Ale with blueberries will do fine for the chaser.

Hmmm... Wondering if something might be amiss.

Guin
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:12 PM
I'm more impressed that you can get a horse to stand perfectly still for ten minutes while you're holding a bottlecap filled with liquid in the same place on its leg.

Adamantane
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:50 PM
I'm more impressed that you can get a horse to stand perfectly still for ten minutes while you're holding a bottlecap filled with liquid in the same place on its leg.

I can't, or at least not so far, though I bet my horse Jack would do that and then some.

That's the next phase with the sopping cotton swabs held in place with tape or vet wrap which my RI is going to try, or we will if our horses get ticks.

Maybe some of our tick-laden CT friends can try it out, too, on themselves and critters as well.

It was hard enough for me to make myself sit still for the ten minutes as needed. Even more challenging to get my girlfriend to sit still for that long for her tick bites, one of which wasn't exactly conveniently located.:no::)

Gotta start somewhere. Nothing else ever worked at all without leaving debris. This unfailingly did. (The deep little divots where the mouth had latched on before it released were pretty creepy to examine afterward.)

wildlifer
Jul. 15, 2010, 09:13 PM
Note: you should never put ANYTHING on a tick to remove it -- it causes the tick to regurgitate what is in its body into YOU. I.e. bacteria, viruses, etc. It's the fastest way to give yourself Lyme's disease. Just grasp the tick's head and pull it out. No squeezing, no goop.

Ghazzu
Jul. 15, 2010, 09:24 PM
Hmmm... Wondering if something might be amiss.

Nope. Quite tasty after finishing up evening barn chores in the summer.

MistyBlue
Jul. 15, 2010, 09:35 PM
I'm in CT and pretty darned tick laden. I don't live far from Lyme or Old Lyme CT. ;)
I also rehab wildlife and live in the woods.
I'm a walking tick magnet. And had have more than my fair share of Lyme Disease.
I follow the grasp firmly but not crushing in front of the body with fingernail tips and pick it right off with one smooth move. Quite simple to do actually, have never left behind any parts. It's easier on a human with bare skin than a furry animal, but you get used to it pretty quick and I can go through an infested animal and remove dozens in a couple minutes without leaving anything behind. (you gotta be quick with some of the animals I'm removing ticks from...they object strongly to the handling, LOL)

It just takes a little getting used to and not being squeamish when you remove the tick. After the tick is off and contained or killed...that's when the average CT resident does the massive Heebie Jeebie dance complete with shudders when one is found on yourself. That's followed by the constant slapping of yourself for the rest of the day/night as you imagine feeling creepy crawlies all over you for a while. (or spotting a mole you forgot you had and trying to pinch it off too, LOL)

Long Spot
Jul. 15, 2010, 09:47 PM
If you work your way back into character as a respected COTH vet,

Are you serious? :lol:


Hmmm... Wondering if something might be amiss.

Me too. But I'm not wondering it about Ghazzu.

katarine
Jul. 15, 2010, 09:55 PM
Someone needs to apply Everclear to the OP. Orally ;)

ESG
Jul. 16, 2010, 12:32 AM
It just takes a little getting used to and not being squeamish when you remove the tick. After the tick is off and contained or killed...that's when the average CT resident does the massive Heebie Jeebie dance complete with shudders when one is found on yourself. That's followed by the constant slapping of yourself for the rest of the day/night as you imagine feeling creepy crawlies all over you for a while. (or spotting a mole you forgot you had and trying to pinch it off too, LOL)

This dance has regional variations everywhere. The Texas version usually involves internal application of copious amounts of either beer (for the hoi polloi) or tequila (for everyone), and a lot of hip waggling. Clothing tends to fly, also, but not for the reasons you think; just to be sure there aren't more miniature vampires lurking on one's skin. :dead:

That said, I think the OP's idea has merit. We don't have a tick problem in our current location (knock wood), but if we develop one, I think I'll try it.

kookicat
Jul. 16, 2010, 08:46 AM
I don't often come across ticks, but when I do, I just gently remove them with my fingernails.

I'm kinda fascinated by the fact that that OP is so convinced his way is the only way to remove them. :lol:

Tamara in TN
Jul. 16, 2010, 08:58 AM
=ESG;4981670. Clothing tends to fly, also, but not for the reasons you think; just to be sure there aren't more miniature vampires lurking on one's skin. :dead:


the mountain musical version is normally something like this:

children enter house at speed if light clutching some bones (hopefully) long dead from woods: <cue lights and music
done in the style of a whirling dervish >

"look what we found"
oh lord not again
"look what we found"
is it all dead?
"look what we found"
where did you go
"in the tall field below the old lime barn,look what we found"
look at your legs
"look what we found"
you're covered in ticks
"look what we found"
get in the bath, get off your clothes,where is the tape!!!!!!!

bones drop, children strip, duct tape is produced,seed ticks crawling at speed of light stopped in their tracks....<music reaches frantic tempo and the crescendo as last tick captured by sticky tape before it attaches>

silent pause then......

"now,look what weeeeeeeeee foundddddddddddddddddddddddd!!!!!!!!!!"

Tamara in TN

katarine
Jul. 16, 2010, 09:09 AM
Amen Tamara! We got into a mess of seed ticks at a horse camp years back. They were so tiny I bet 10-15 would fit on a grain of rice. I guess we could have marinated in Everclear but gettin' nekked fast as soon as we threw horses in stalls- tacked LOL- we ran for the LQ and stripped in the horse box. All clothes went in a plastic garbage sack, and we headed for the bath house for a more complete inspection....THEN the horses got stripped. All things in due time and all that ;)

great googly moogly that was gross and freaky to deal with LOL

chaltagor
Jul. 16, 2010, 07:55 PM
I'll never forget my ex dropping his pants right on the trail for me to check his legs and thighs and another couple coming up around a bend to see his boxers and me kneeling behind him. Good times.

pj
Jul. 16, 2010, 08:17 PM
A month or so ago I was taking a shower and a place on my back was itching like crazy. Done showering I wrapped up in a towel and marched into the livingroom where my dh was sitting. I asked him to look at my back and see if he saw anything as I couldn't reach the spot. He peered closely at my back (without his glasses) and said he didn't see anything but "that mole". Mole?? I didn't remember a mole on my back. As I've had many surgerys on skin cancers that seemed to be something I needed to pay attention to but didn't mention it to him.

Now we are not a house with mirrors. I have a small hand mirror and a bathroom cabinet mirror that I need to climb up and sit in the sink to see anything but my head. You can't get very close to the mirror because of the faucets. I looked best I could and...yep..there was what appeared to be a mole.
A mole that came up that quick...not good. Something that quick? Melanoma?
It didn't look like the ones I'd seen (never had one of those, thank you Lord) but...

Started researching melanomas. Oh MY! There was one called a nodular melanoma, second most agressive, usually when diagnoised it's too late. It looked like what I could see. I'm thinking I need to start making arrangements for my animals, check my will, I probably don't have much time.

I didn't sleep well that night but had agreed to meet a friend to ride and, after all there probably wouldn't be many more rides for me so after calling the Doctor and making an appointment for the next day I went and met her. :(
When we met I told her the sad news. She said let me see that! She looked and said "it's a D*** TICK!! AND it's dead!"
LOL we jumped around dancing...what a relief!

Then she asked wonder why it's dead? The only thing I can think of is I had frontlined the dogs two days before and gotten some on my fingers.
:)

Now I tell my dumb but lovable husband "I pulled a "mole" off today"

Tamara in TN
Jul. 16, 2010, 08:23 PM
I'll never forget my ex dropping his pants right on the trail for me to check his legs and thighs and another couple coming up around a bend to see his boxers and me kneeling behind him. Good times.

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

Tamara in TN

Tamara in TN
Jul. 16, 2010, 08:25 PM
Amen Tamara! We got into a mess of seed ticks at a horse camp years back. They were so tiny I bet 10-15 would fit on a grain of rice.
great googly moogly that was gross and freaky to deal with LOL

yep that's them...nothing lines up little boys around here like soldiers in their drawers like the command "TICK CHECK!"

Tamara in TN

ESG
Jul. 16, 2010, 09:37 PM
I'll never forget my ex dropping his pants right on the trail for me to check his legs and thighs and another couple coming up around a bend to see his boxers and me kneeling behind him. Good times.

But did the other couple veer discreetly away, or opt to join the fun? ROLMAO! :lol:

Adamantane
Jul. 16, 2010, 09:46 PM
Glad that so many here have experience dealing with ticks. Most of the time it's just an inconvenience with no particular consequence.

I know people here in North Carolina with Lyme.

A local trainer who will soon be working with our second horse Bailey is just recovering, I understand.

A boarder at my barn had Lyme. She says she probably will never be right from it.

Another woman with whom I serve on an Orange County, NC civic association board was severely afflicted several years back. She was undertreated, hurt for life, and after limited recovery helped establish an organization for Lyme sufferers who like her were undertreated by uninformed physicians who didn't know the proper treatment protocols.

I used to work in Durham with a Ph.D. microbiologist who to his annoyance came down with Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever from a tick bite but didn't recognize the symptoms in himself until his MD pointed them out in the hospital.

BIG issue here in NC.:yes: No joke.:no:

Easy to see how someone might become matter-of-fact or flip about a daily nuisance and fact of life, if that was all there were to it.

Can't imagine how anyone in healthcare could view infectious tick management -- particularly involving people -- as trivial. Even if many critters may have some immunity, most people don't.

Managing tick-borne infection risk is not like hefting the manure fork, scooping up the shit, and being done with it, muckers quit your bitching.

Didn't spend years off and on experimenting with different hoof picks to see which works the best. (Okay, the kind with the screwdriver-type ends pretty much suck in my opinion.;))

I did spend some time over several years as tick bites presented, trying to find a useful practical and safe answer to a medically important problem here in NC for which nobody else's proposed or traditional solutions seemed to work very well or reliably, at least in my hands or those of others I know.

Could have waited to see how well the cotton ball soaked variation works. If that's as good it sure will be more practical for people and for critters.

(Cotton balls soak up moisture so might not be effective. No way to know for sure without more experiments, but I don't happen to have any fresh tick bites and am not into human sacrifice.:no:)

But it's tick season now, not two months from now. No time to waste collecting more data for easier ways to use it.

If with this initial information even ONE friend here on COTH can avoid either getting sick or having a skin infection who otherwise might not have, that's one less person with a problem.

ESG
Jul. 16, 2010, 10:48 PM
Nicely put. :yes:

Ghazzu
Jul. 16, 2010, 10:59 PM
Probably the most efficacious procedure is to take 200 mg of doxycycline after removing the tick.

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/short/345/2/79

HeartofGlass
Jul. 18, 2010, 02:41 PM
I think the more tools we have in our arsenal against ticks, the better! I'm glad this works so well.

Personally, though, I don't know if I could stand to wait for 10 minutes if one were on me. Last time I found a tick on myself (in the shower) I screamed, yanked it off, and threw it as hard as I could. Found it 3 days later crawling on a towel. Blech. I can't help it, they give me the heebie-jeebies!!

The one time I had to deal with a severe tick infestation on an animal, they were buried deep in my yearling's mane. My solution was to pick a leaf off of a nearby plant, and use the leaf to pull the ticks off one by one, throw the ticks on the ground and squish. That way I didn't have to touch them.

The yearling was living with a herd in a large pasture at the time. I didn't realize at first that he wasn't doing well there. He was apparently getting run off of the grain (not being fed separately), and also ended up with over 60 ticks, most of which were hiding in the base of his mane and tail, and lice. Ugh. Oh, and a severe worm infestation, too. It took months to get him healthy and growing again, after moving him to a different farm.

So anyway, obviously in that type of situation, even if the cotton ball thing would work, there were just so many that it would take too long. But I could see doing that for a small number of ticks, if the person in question isn't as squeamish as me! I also like that the alchohol disinfects the area.

tikihorse2
Jul. 18, 2010, 04:51 PM
Ticks and Lyme disease are NOT funny.

HOWEVER, using Everclear to get a tick smashed (it's not wandering around on you after the treatment, it's STAGGERING!) so you can remove it easily is one of the funniest things I've ever heard of! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

It appears to be proof that ethyl alcohol has the same effect on all living creatures.

Mods, I nominate this thread for the "Classics" archive or whatever it is. It has all the earmarks of a COTH classic!

Kim

TheHeimer
Jul. 18, 2010, 06:26 PM
http://www.tickedoff.com/

Buy a few Ticked Off thingiemabobbers.

I love 'em so much, I have several and keep them all over. Barn, car, purse, bathroom, wherever.

Fantastic investment. 100% success rate.

Sithly
Jul. 19, 2010, 12:18 AM
http://www.tickedoff.com/

Buy a few Ticked Off thingiemabobbers.

I love 'em so much, I have several and keep them all over. Barn, car, purse, bathroom, wherever.

Fantastic investment. 100% success rate.

Awesome. I want one. I hate touching ticks.

Thomas_1
Jul. 19, 2010, 12:50 PM
Laphroaig, if you're buying :D.

Definitely my sort of lady!

Drinks decent whiskey AND can remove a tick quickly and efficiently :winkgrin:

Tiki
Jul. 19, 2010, 02:28 PM
Easy to see how someone might become matter-of-fact or flip about a daily nuisance and fact of life Ummmmm, I think you're overreacting a little bit here!

I can't imagine waiting 10 minutes per tick to get them off after you've been out in the weeds.

Just grip them gently between thumb and forefinger, apply gentle pressure for a few seconds and they come right off - yes, sometimes with a bit if epidermis in their teeny tiny little jaws. Then dump them in a close mouthed jar of alcohol - after removing the cap of course. It pickles them quite nicely. I keep the jar and just add as found. :D

DON'T squish them with your bare hands. That's another good way of getting the infectious material into your body.

10 minutes to remove a tick . . . . . geeeeezzzzzzzzz I can't imagine. They come off very, very easily with just a little tension applied.

BTW, I was one of the original researchers on the ecology and epidemiology of Babesiosis on the Island of Nantucket in '76/'77. We used to flag for ticks, pick them off the flags and store them for testing. We also used to trap mice, pick ticks off the mice and do the same. We wore white knee socks with our pants tucked in. Got tons of ticks on the flags and tons of ticks on the socks and sometimes a number of ticks on us. No way would I or my colleagues spend 10 minutes per tick, coddling it with alcohol and getting it blind staggering drunk to get it off. :no::no::no::winkgrin::lol::D:);) That is just . not . necessary!!!!!

Auventera Two
Jul. 19, 2010, 03:08 PM
A trainwreck over how to remove a freakin tick? Seriously? I've been pulling ticks off for 25 years and I've never had any problems yet. Just grasp them close to the skin and pull in a smooth steady motion. When you freak out and rip it off as fast as you can, that's when you're most likely to leave the head embedded.

kookicat
Jul. 19, 2010, 03:49 PM
Ah, it wouldn't be COTH if the simple things didn't turn into trainwrecks. :lol:

hundredacres
Jul. 19, 2010, 04:01 PM
kookiecat speaks the Coth gospel.

kookicat
Jul. 19, 2010, 04:13 PM
kookiecat speaks the Coth gospel.

:lol::lol::lol:

MistyBlue
Jul. 19, 2010, 04:19 PM
We wore white knee socks with our pants tucked in.

LOL, that's how I do a tick check of any areas I'll be weedwacking or working on foot in. :yes:
An older pair of white tube socks with my pant legs tucked in and then walk through the tall stuff for 10 minutes and recheck.
A good way I keep them off of me if I go in to weedwack a tall weed section is to just use double sided tape and wrap it from knee down on the outside of my pants. Ticks stick to it and can't move. Afterwards I unroll it, rolling them into it and toss it away.

And on boring days I use an small piece of the tape and stick it to my cat for fun. :winkgrin:

Auventera Two
Jul. 19, 2010, 04:59 PM
If you REALLY want to cause a scene for people driving past your farm, trek around in the front pasture with knee length blue pajamas tucked into pink flowered pajama pants, tucked into white tube socks with red stripes pulled up to the knees, then hot pink Araiat boots, and a stocking cap while looking for a halter. You don't realize how stupid you look until the 3rd car has slowed down to 20 mph and is staring. They're trying to figure out if you're an escapee from some place or if you actually do live there but are sleep walking.