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Lieslot
Jul. 14, 2010, 08:17 AM
This has been going on for the last 3 wks "daily" and I'm at the end of my tether with this bird.
He's trying to get into our attic, and is trying to peck a hole in the woodboard right under the roof on the side of the house. He usually gets started early mornings at about 4.45/5am and returns to his favorite roofspot late evening 8pm until dark.

He's seemingly not so smart coz during daytime he also targets our living room 'window'!! I have a small half moon window above the regular rectangular window, he lands on there and will peck the window for as long as no one chases him away.

He has made big holes in quite a few my fence posts, grrr and his latest stunt, pecking a hole in my barn, side of my washstall.

This bird has got to go, but I have no clue how. I scream at him daily, I've already pointed the hose at him, but that doesn't deter him.

Please, please all suggestions welcome. Should we buy a plastic pellet gun?
Anyway I can trap this bird?

Polydor
Jul. 14, 2010, 08:23 AM
We have found that a sling shot ( found at your hunting store) with a pine cone/ ice cube works quite well. Pine cones work well since they make a weird noise when they fly which also freaks them out. My family are big bird watches so we use the pine cone/ ice cube type things that probably won't hurt them if we do actually hit them ( rarely!! lol )

Also the key is do be pretty persistant right back at him.

Hope that helps.

P.

MistyBlue
Jul. 14, 2010, 08:25 AM
I don't know a whole lot about avian wildlife (I'm more into the wildlife that bites, LOL) but woodpeckers I'm pretty sure are protected by the migratory bird act.

Is it trying to make a nest or is it after bugs? have you checked the board it's pecking for signs of bugs? You could get up on a ladder and attach some metal window screen over it (not the fabric screen). Maybe that would help?

It's pecking the window due to it's reflection most likely. Lots of birds are territorial and that woodpecker is probably cheesed off at the "strange woodpecker" in the window that copies everything it does. :winkgrin:

I've had the hummingbirds I've started putting out feeders for this year attacking my Jeep's side view mirrors. One stubborn one hovers in front of it peeping insults on and off all day long.

Is there a local Audoban you can call? Try calling your state's main Audoban office and asking their advice. They're each state's bird experts. They'll know how to either deter this one or who you can call to have it removed.

Frank B
Jul. 14, 2010, 08:35 AM
Woodpeckers are persistant, protected AND DESTRUCTIVE. This is a "shoot, shovel & shut up" situation.

You didn't hear it here...

WaningMoon
Jul. 14, 2010, 09:24 AM
For two yrs a large woodpecker has been pecking at this house for hours at a time. I started buying him those suet blocks that are made for woodpeckers. He now leaves the house alone as long as his suet basket if full. A northern flicker joins him there now too. But if that basket is empty, then watch out. Each time I go out the damn bird dives at my head. ONCE, he came close enough I could feel his wing hit my shoulder. Now, I am very careful to be sure his basket is not empty and he still has not returned to pecking the house.

RacetrackReject
Jul. 14, 2010, 09:26 AM
I agree with MistyBlue that he is probably pecking on the window because of the "rival" he sees.

I have tons of woodpeckers at my farm, but they don't bother my house. Maybe try putting out some woodpeck suet or something for him to eat on and it will distract him from the house? Not sure.

I believe most, if not all, woodpeckers are protected and there a few that are endangered. You could maybe take your chances with s,s,s but if you get caught, it could be some hefty fines. Several species of woodpecker mate for life as well.

AnotherRound
Jul. 14, 2010, 09:38 AM
I agree with MistyBlue. If he's pecking a hole in the side of a building, he's looking for bugs, and if he's persisting, he's found a good store of them in your house and buildings. The pecking is food searching, not house building, so you probably have insect infestations which are keeping him around. Look for bees (honey bees in the walls or carpenter bees eating the wood. You can find bees by putting your hand or ear to the wall and hearing the hum and feeling the vibration of the colony) termites and ant colonies.

I also think you could solve alot of this if you put out suet blocks. My dad had three suet blocks on his back porch, and had 7 or eight woodpeckers every day, including some large pileated as well as smaller downy and redheaded and flickers. They didn't bother the house when the suet was up, but when it was gone they'd start at the house and the work shed in the yard.

Also, you can really help yourself by putting up metal mesh or cage wire he can't get through over your eaves and over hangs.

TrueColours
Jul. 14, 2010, 09:38 AM
We have a ton of woodpeckers around here but we also have enough trees they are perfectly happy pecking on them instead

Its the damned huge crows that fly up and peck at their reflection in my trailer all day long that is wrecking my trailer and driving me nuts. They will be going "bye bye" very very shortly ... :yes:

wendy
Jul. 14, 2010, 10:12 AM
you'll get in big trouble for killing/harrassing a woodpecker.
They peck things for three reasons:

looking for bugs. If your woodpecker keeps pecking your house, fenceposts, etc. I'd suggest you have a nasty bug infestation you may want to check out and get rid of.

making a nest. Possible, but it's not a mated pair, right?

marking territory. many birds sing to say "I'm here go away" woodpeckers go around pounding on things making noise to say "I'm here go away". This is the most common reason they pound regularly on house roofs in early mornings. Also a big reason for pecking shiny surfaces- they see the reflection.

Some people claim just sticking strips of shiny mylar tape over areas where the woodpecker is visiting will stop him. Other people claim they will stop in a few weeks whether you do anything or not.

GoodyTwo
Jul. 14, 2010, 11:53 AM
I had extensive woodpecker damage on my cedar sided house a few years ago… that was from one of the small peckers and was repaired by my insurance company (it was that bad). The woodpecker eventually left and hopefully he’s gone for good. I’m told that they often peck wood to attract a mate.

A couple of months ago I heard a huge banging on the house and when I went outside to see what was going on, it was a peliated (the huge Woody Woodpecker type) going to town on the house. They’re quite shy, so I only had to yell at him once and he moved along.

TrueColours, please don’t kill the crows. They’re the smartest, neatest birds. Maybe give them something else to amuse themselves with other than your trailer.

twofatponies
Jul. 14, 2010, 11:56 AM
I've heard it works to hang windchimes in the areas where the woodpecker is persisting - glittery ones or ones with lots of moving parts.

WhiteCamry
Jul. 14, 2010, 12:03 PM
Woodpeckers are persistant, protected AND DESTRUCTIVE. This is a "shoot, shovel & shut up" situation.

You didn't hear it here...

Or get a cat. One with a history of emotional problems.

Whistlejacket
Jul. 14, 2010, 12:56 PM
I live in a log house, and last year I had a woodpecker that considered my house an "all-you-can-eat Denny's restaurant"! Not fun. It was going after carpenter bee larvae.

Here is a pretty informative website on the topic

http://cecalaveras.ucdavis.edu/woodpeck.htm


Woodpeckers are persistant, protected AND DESTRUCTIVE. This is a "shoot, shovel & shut up" situation.

You didn't hear it here...

Also, are far as the recommendation to kill them, as it described on the website: "Woodpeckers are classified as migratory, nongame birds and are protected by the Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The red-cocaded woodpecker and the ivory billed woodpecker are on the Endangered Species list and are thus offered full protection. When warranted, woodpeckers, other than the endangered species, may be killed but only under a permit issued by the Law Enforcement Division of the US Fish and Wildlife Service upon recommendation of USDA-APHIS-Animal Damage Control personnel. Generally, there must be a good case to justify issuance of a permit. Woodpeckers are commonly protected under state laws, and in those instances a state permit may be required for measures that involve lethal control or nest destruction. Other methods of reducing woodpecker damage do not infringe upon their legal protection status. Threatened or endangered, however, cannot be harassed."

You might want to check with your local extension or US Fish and Wildlife agent for recommendations in your area.

Good luck! WJ

katarine
Jul. 14, 2010, 01:54 PM
I bet he's after carpenter bee larvae or other bugs. I'd be calling the exteriminator to address that issue and Mr Woody will move along to tastier places.

For the mirror image pecking check your wild bird store, they have things you can stick on the windows to discourage him.

ParkMorgan
Jul. 14, 2010, 02:50 PM
I have a wood pecker that lives in my barn. He/ she has never pecked anything. He/she roosts in the tackroom at night and then heads out in the morning. funny little creature... I had worried about him doing damage to the barn until I talked to someone that explained that he wouldn't do any damage as long as there weren't any bugs in the wood and so far that has been the truth..

Lieslot
Jul. 14, 2010, 03:26 PM
Thanks for all the replies.
Didn't realize they are protected. I'm not for killing animals anyway, but gosh this one is certainly working on my nerves.

I will get a a suet feeder and hang it near the side of the house he's attacking. As well as close to the window.
Will see if that hopefully helps.

Not sure if we have insects up there, it's so high, I'd have to climb part of the roof itself to get to the spot he selected. He obviously had to pick a spot where one cannot come with a ladder, we'd need a boomlift that can reach sideways far enough to get to it.
My barn is new, shouldn't have any insect infestation yet, well you'd think. Same with my fencing which was treated.
However that being said, we do have carpenter bees, they upset me hugely too and yes they will drill holes even in brand new treated wood :mad:.
I'm usually killing as many as pos with a bug zapper, but there's new ones every day.

I've taped cardboard on the inside of the window he usually pecks at, but he was trying my kitchen window thereafter. Perhaps I need to board up all my windows and live in the dark :mad:.

Fingers crossed the suet will do the job. But will I thereby not be attracting the very many crows that live in my pasture or do they only go for meatbites like the vultures I have here?

Tom King
Jul. 14, 2010, 03:42 PM
I'm betting it's a Flicker (also called a Yellowhammer. They appear to have a lot more yellow on them in person from a distance than they do in photographs). They will not stop coming back regardless of how you scare it. They will keep pecking until they make a hole big enough to get into and often cannot find their way back out. They go in and go up for some reason and sometimes don't know to come back down. This time of year they are looking for a place to build a nest. Their offspring raised in the building will come back next year for more of the same.

What Frank said.

Lieslot
Jul. 14, 2010, 04:24 PM
Hmm, dunno. It's a fairly large bird, say about 2,5 times the size of a robin and it has lots & lots of black dots over its back & feathers. I thought it was black & whit-ish.

One thing is for sure, when he pecks it's the same spot both barn & house, he goes straight for the top part of the roof triangle on the side. When you have a v-shaped roof, on the facade-side he goes straight for the highest part of the triangle, making me think he wants to get into the attic.

katarine
Jul. 14, 2010, 04:36 PM
Suet- I have suet out almost yr round and no trouble with crows bothering it. And I have lots of woodpeckers coming to eat it daily.

You need something on the exterior of the window I bet.

Carpenter bees: I bought this guy's Bee Butter and it works slick. I sadistically enjoy watching them crawl out, get a taste, and die a rather painful death. The traps he sells are REDNECK, but they work, too.

http://www.carpenterbeesolutions.com/products-to-get-rid-of-carpenter-bees.html

Lieslot
Jul. 14, 2010, 04:47 PM
Katarine, thank you, I need to forward those carpenter bee traps to my husband, he will love you! He hates those bees so much.
I'm about to place an order for these.

We didn't realize you could do something against the carpenter bees. When we first moved here from Europe, I had never seen anything like it, I panicked and thought considering their size they were 'killer bees', so I called out Viking and asked them to come out the same day as we had killer bees. The guy that came out, had to laugh and said not to worry they're carpenter bees, they are harmless to humans & animals, totally normal in NJ and they usually leave new & painted wood alone. So since we accepted to co-exist with them and I have some daily exercise in summer zapping them.

I will get some suet just to see what happens, but I can hear my husband go : "WHAT first he tries to wreck the house and now I have to feed him @#$%^&! Hope those suet cakes will last a few days, so I don't have to replace them daily, else it'll be an expensive deterrent.

katarine
Jul. 14, 2010, 05:00 PM
I was worried it wouldn't help but wow at the difference. We had a board that was completely bee-riddled and with one pass with the butter, we got them all. You only need to use a little bit, too. I was a bit late with getting the traps up but we've caught several. I hope you are pleased with them!

JanM
Jul. 14, 2010, 05:01 PM
When I lived in Colorado there were many people who had bad problems with woodpeckers. Apparently since the bulldoze everything and then put up houses mentality was flourishing there, the birds had a lack of rotten trees to build nests in. Since many houses were masonite or wood siding the birds thought they were trees and acted accordingly. One day I was home and heard a pounding up near the roof peak under the eaves and it was a woodpecker who had broken the one piece of siding-he flew away when I came outside to see what it was, and he never returned. But, when I lived in the townhouse the older woodsided place across the street had a wood pecker drill a hold in the side, build a nest and raise a family in the wall cavity. Honestly though, the place was stained dark brown and did look kind of like a dead tree.

MistyBlue
Jul. 14, 2010, 05:02 PM
Suet lasts quite some time. Unless you get 200 other birds enjoying it or else a coon or fisher find the feeder.

Then it lasts 5 mintues. :winkgrin:

I put suet out in winter and even getting hit by multiple birds daily I only need to replenish it about once a week IIRC.

Lieslot
Jul. 14, 2010, 05:09 PM
You guys are so great :).

I ordered the beetraps & butter, whoopidoo, all exciting about dealing with those buzzers.

And will go to Home Depot tomorrow to get suet & cake. I'll hang it high up in the tree nearest to the side of the house.
Hopefully this will sort the problem humanely.

cholmberg
Jul. 14, 2010, 05:20 PM
We had one go to town on our house once. He was attracted by the
carpenter bees and he was VERY annoying since I worked swing shift and 5 to 6am was the middle of my sleep time (5 to 1 or 7 to 3 shifts). . . .but we
never bothered him, there were tons of rotten trees n the woods and he
eventually moved on. but not before he had really worn out his welcome, but he was one of the rare ones, and I wouldn't have dreamed of hurting him. But yeah, that drumming can start working on the nerves after a while.

JSwan
Jul. 14, 2010, 06:04 PM
I'd love to see a picture of the bird. My favorite is the Pileated Woodpecker.

Tom King
Jul. 14, 2010, 06:56 PM
Hmm, dunno. It's a fairly large bird, say about 2,5 times the size of a robin and it has lots & lots of black dots over its back & feathers. I thought it was black & whit-ish.

One thing is for sure, when he pecks it's the same spot both barn & house, he goes straight for the top part of the roof triangle on the side. When you have a v-shaped roof, on the facade-side he goes straight for the highest part of the triangle, making me think he wants to get into the attic.


She's looking for a nesting spot. She's not looking for something to eat. They don't like Oak, but anything else must seem like a big hollow tree. They always go for the highest spot.

I'm not just making this up. I've known quite a few of them. She has decided this is the right spot and nothing you can do will discourage her from coming back.

http://www.schollphoto.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=28&pos=2

Lieslot
Jul. 14, 2010, 07:35 PM
Aie aie, well Tom, yes the bird looks 'very' much like the picture you attached.

If I could get to the spot where he/she pecks I'd hang up some netting, but I honestly don't know how to get there without climbing the roof and most likely kill myself.
I need to see if my husband thinks renting a boomlift could reach that far.

It's definitely a very determined bird, I have attached the pressure hose earlier in the week, -only thing I have that will reach that far- and I swear I got the bird quite wet, but he/she only disappeared for the afternoon to be back that same evening.

If suet doesn't do it then, I'll have to find out if there's some wildlife protection agency around here to ask them what to do. But really, no matter what suggestions they'll make, as in hang such & such off that area, I don't think I can get to it.
To give you an idea, only picture I have of the house taken from that angle (horses are on there too, was taking for horsey purpose in the past :lol:) :
http://entertainment.webshots.com/photo/2662814960103033870cHJDWq
You see the white board left of the chimney, highest point really, that's where she pecks. The house side-ing is vinyl, but top boards underneath each roof are wood.
I'd have to get a ladder on the roof over the garage, climb that, then the roof of the 1st floor facade, and only then might be able to get close enough to the attic facade to get to top of that triangle. One thing I'm not sure of, right underneath that triangle, you might be able to see in pic, there's a wood vent, and perhaps she's trying to peck the woodvent to pieces, which means easy access to attic :(.

Vesper Sparrow
Jul. 14, 2010, 07:52 PM
Flickers should already have nested by now, and at least up here don't have multiple broods, so I doubt she's excavating a nest hole. I imagine she'll knock it off :lol: soon... Flickers love ants so hope she finds a congenial anthill nearby...

WaningMoon
Jul. 15, 2010, 06:29 AM
I'm betting it's a Flicker (also called a Yellowhammer. They appear to have a lot more yellow on them in person from a distance than they do in photographs). They will not stop coming back regardless of how you scare it. They will keep pecking until they make a hole big enough to get into and often cannot find their way back out. They go in and go up for some reason and sometimes don't know to come back down. This time of year they are looking for a place to build a nest. Their offspring raised in the building will come back next year for more of the same.

What Frank said.

Now here anyhow, my northern flickers leave my house right alone, but the hairy and downy woodpeckers would not, until I started putting out suet. My flickers I have not seen doing anything except sitting here on the limb by my window. Not only do they have more yellow than in pics but they also have that scarlet red triangle on the back of their necks.

HighFlyinBey++
Jul. 15, 2010, 07:16 AM
Long ago in another lifetime, I used to feed songbirds.

Once you've purchased the suet, DO NOT throw out the plastic containers! Reuse them to make your own suet that doesn't melt or go rancid in the heat:

1 cup crunchy peanut butter
1 cup lard
2 cups quick cook oats
2 cups cornmeal
1 cup flour
1/3 cup sugar

Melt the peanut butter and lard and add remaining ingredients and cool.

They LOVE this stuff! I used to make it in a HUGE metal bowl and freeze until needed. I had so many birds, including northern flickers and a visit or two from a pileated woodpecker.

After I moved out of that house, my sister moved in and stopped feeding them. She said that they came back looking for my feeders for years, until she replaced the old window with a gorgeous bay window.

I'm not allowed to feed birds where I live now, but I have some sparrows and finches that like to perch on the roof outside the windows. They drive the cats nuts because they're SOCLOSEYETSOFAR :lol:

For kicks & giggles, find a website with recorded bird sound and play for your cats. Mine (indoor-only apartment dwellers) very clearly tell me which ones are around because they go nuts looking for the "bird" in my speakers :lol: They ignore the others, I suspect because they don't recognize them as birds.

AnotherRound
Jul. 15, 2010, 07:50 AM
To give you an idea, only picture I have of the house taken from that angle (horses are on there too, was taking for horsey purpose in the past :lol:) :
http://entertainment.webshots.com/photo/2662814960103033870cHJDWq
You see the white board left of the chimney, highest point really, that's where she pecks. The house side-ing is vinyl, but top boards underneath each roof are wood.
I'd have to get a ladder on the roof over the garage, climb that, then the roof of the 1st floor facade, and only then might be able to get close enough to the attic facade to get to top of that triangle. One thing I'm not sure of, right underneath that triangle, you might be able to see in pic, there's a wood vent, and perhaps she's trying to peck the woodvent to pieces, which means easy access to attic :(.

Sounds like maybe you could access this area from the attic.

Tom King
Jul. 15, 2010, 08:34 AM
quote:
"
Flickers should already have nested by now, and at least up here don't have multiple broods, so I doubt she's excavating a nest hole. I imagine she'll knock it off :lol: soon... Flickers love ants so hope she finds a congenial anthill nearby..."

I saw one pecking on the side of a house near here just a few days ago. They add to their nests all season long. If something happened to her last home, like the dead tree fell down, she's looking for someplace new.

Rat snakes seek out their nests in old buildings. I've pulled out some huge nests from historic buildings and dealt with both the birds and the rat snakes. After the rat snakes get the young, more are reproduced and the snake just hangs around and waits.

I've tried everything I can think of from luring away with food to plastic snakes, and nothing I've tried has discouraged them coming back-much like the OP's hose. They just come back when things quiet down.

Unfortunately, Frank gave the best solution.

MistyBlue
Jul. 15, 2010, 09:13 AM
Lieslot, what a very pretty house!

Good luck with the woodpecker. Let us know if you find something that works.

Tom King
Jul. 15, 2010, 03:09 PM
Hopefully, the vinyl siding will discourage her enough to leave. I started building houses with White Oak siding in 1976 because of Flickers and flying squirrels getting in the attics of the first few houses I built on the lake with cedar and cypress siding.

One tried on our house with oak, but left after a few days. Maybe the vinyl will be enough protection.

Lieslot
Jul. 15, 2010, 07:05 PM
Thx Misty, we like it, we were very fortunate to have found it at the right time :). I've got to say however, I keep thinking it must have been designed by a man. Coz a woman would have been thinking about accessibility for cleaning!! One nearly has to break a leg to get to the cathedral window inside to a) take out the woodsquares and b) clean the window. Telescopic cleaners, ha, what a joke, ...

I got peanut butter cake & a feeder, just need to get husband to put it up as high as pos.
Will keep you posted how it goes. Cardboard taped on the outside of the window now is doing the job so far.

We actually will need to find a way to get to the top attic board, coz eventhough woodpecker hasn't made a hole 'yet', he pecked off a lot of the white paint, so it'll need a paint and at the same time we might as well put something preventative up there once we get that high.

AnotherRound, no sadly no access via attic, I already checked that, no luck there.

HighFlyinBey++ thx for that recipe will surely try that.

WaningMoon, I just googled a picture of a downy woodpecker, and actually it looks very much like the one I have but then quite a tad bigger. Those downy ones look relatively small, this is a rather big guy.

I'll try to get a picture of him, hopefully one where he's eating the suet, no my house :D.

Equibrit
Jul. 15, 2010, 07:13 PM
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/wp_about/control.html

The best way to keep woodpeckers from hammering on your house is to begin damage control as soon as you hear the first tap. And you should continue these measures even after the woodpecker has left to ensure that it does not return. Any holes the bird has made in your house should be immediately repaired and painted to avoid attracting more woodpeckers.

General woodpecker deterrents

1. Tactile deterrents

Although some people recommend applying sticky repellents such as Tanglefoot Pest Control, Roost-No-More, and Bird Stop to areas where damage is occurring, we are against using them. These products can get on a bird’s plumage, impairing its ability to fly and stay warm. Moreover, they can darken and stain wooden siding and cause dirt to adhere to the surface where they’re applied. 2. Visual deterrents


Aluminum foil strips or reflective tape, such as Irri-Tape (http://bird-x.com/products/itape.htm), manufactured by Bird-X, hung from areas where damage occurs may scare away woodpeckers. The strips should be long enough to hang freely and blow in the breeze.
Windsocks hung from house corners serve the same purpose as aluminum foil and may be less intrusive.
Handheld windmills, especially those with reflective vanes, can be attached along areas of damage. The motion of the revolving vanes may discourage woodpeckers.
Plastic owls hung from the eaves of a house will generally frighten off woodpeckers for the first few days. However, birds often acclimate to the same visual stimulus in the same exact place every single day. Terror Eyes (http://bird-x.com/products/terror.html) manufactured by Bird-X, may prove effective as an alternative to plastic owls. This product bounces from a spring, and the lenticular, holographic eyes follow the bird in any direction. Therefore, the product is actually moving, making it less likely that the birds will become acclimated to it. 3. Sound deterrents


With an electronic distress call system, a recording of a woodpecker distress call followed by the call of a predator such as a Sharp-shinned Hawk is broadcast through a speaker system at various intervals to frighten woodpeckers away from your house. One example is BirdXPeller Pro (http://bird-x.com/products/bxpel.html), manufactured by Bird-X.
A movement detector that makes noise when it senses movement can be attached to damaged areas (this will also keep deer away from your garden).

Listen to the distress call of a Downy Woodpecker, followed by the call of a Sharp-shinned Hawk (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/wp_about/lib/audio/Downy_Sharpie.wav) » 4. Other preventative measures

To prevent damage under eaves, lightweight nylon or plastic netting can be attached from the overhanging eaves to the siding of the damaged building. One type of netting on the market is BirdNet (http://bird-x.com/products/bnet.html), manufactured by Bird-X. To keep the birds from reaching through the net, leave at least three inches between the net and the siding.
Aluminum flashing can be used to cover existing holes or to line the corner or fascia boards of the house. You can paint it to match your siding.
Setting up a suet feeder in your yard may draw the birds away from your house. Keep the feeder supplied with food throughout fall, winter, and spring when natural food is scarce and the birds are hungriest because of the cold weather. Remove the feeder during the hot summer months because the suet may become sticky and adhere to the bird’s plumage.
To dull the sound produced by drumming, place padding behind the area where the bird is drumming. Back to top (http://www.birds.cornell.edu/wp_about/control.html#top)

Nesting or roosting woodpecker problem
As long as a nest is not already established, existing holes should be plugged with wood putty. If the birds already have eggs or young, the holes can be sealed after the nestlings have fledged, usually by midsummer. The preventive measures outlined under General Woodpecker Deterrents can then be followed to keep the woodpecker off your house.

Lieslot
Jul. 15, 2010, 07:55 PM
Waw, thx Equibrit. I definitely like the idea of sound deterrent, I'll look into that.

Ha, how funny I just played that recording, and suddenly my budgies start screaming, I guess they don't like the sound of a hawk either.

Foxtrot's
Jul. 16, 2010, 12:22 AM
Can't help you - just wanted to say I love these threads about wildlife and (from this distance) am enjoyig your pain. We have them here, but not in numbers.

On another note, if anyone has a wooded area it really helps wildlife habitat if the rotten trees can be safely left alone and landowners are not so clean and neat and tidy.

Foxtrot's
Jul. 16, 2010, 12:24 AM
Oh - and love your greyhound pictures. She/he looks a lot like our Zoe.

Lieslot
Jul. 16, 2010, 06:44 AM
Haha, thx Foxtrot, it's a 'he', a little confusing with the bright "pink" collar, but that's for visibility, because I allow him to a have a full speed run around my pasture and eventhough he has an impeccable callback, I need to be able to see him very well, after all he's still a greyhound ;).
Awesome dog, couldn't have wished for anything better, he adjusted very well to his new 'greyt' life :D.

Hinderella
Jul. 16, 2010, 02:59 PM
I'm late to the party here, just found this thread. We had a downy woodpecker making a mess of our shingled house. My sister, who is a wildlife biologist with a lot of bird experience, suggested hanging shiny things in the area....old CDs, like the ones with outdated software on them, are the best. The movement and the shine will scare them off and hopefully send them somewhere else.

rmh_rider
Jul. 17, 2010, 07:12 PM
We had some woodies putting billions of holes in my apple trees. Grrr. It was around october, here in 'bama. I chased and chased and shoo'd until I was about to scream. I can not stay outside 24/7 and guard the trees. Neither can the dog. So I thought ok, I am going to scare you away. I did. I used walmart bags. Tied them all over the trees. Some were split, some were whole, some were white, some were blue/aqua, some were target polka dots, some were publix brown. It worked. I left them there until december. Tie them on really good.

If you can go up and nail or staple a bunch up there go for it. You could even get some lattice, like white plastic which is fairly light weight and tie a billion bags on it, put THAT up there and they will not like it. Also could put a fake owl that has a head that moves around in a 360.

Woodies are very destructive. If you are "green" or "peta" about it, you will pay lots of money to fix the damage. Also their babies will come back, and nest there. And the life cycle will be starting all over.

Walmart bags, they are a good thing. :-O

KitKat987
Jul. 17, 2010, 07:46 PM
We had one two springs in a row. Stupid bird was pecking on our metal chimney at 5 am every morning. Of course, that sound reverberated throughout the entire house! Not fun. The zillion tennis balls that the dogs leave lying around the yard, along with their ball launcher came in very, very handy. I never hit the little sh1t, although I can't say I didn't try, but I did come close and he finally gave up moved out after a few mornings of me running outside in my pjs cursing and chucking tennis balls at him.

vacation1
Jul. 17, 2010, 08:16 PM
Or get a cat. One with a history of emotional problems.

There are other kinds?:lol:

mtk9122
Jul. 18, 2010, 05:08 AM
Our neighbor had a redheaded woodie who had a nice beat going on the flashing on her chimney. I thought it was loud from my yard but then she invited me to come into her house and hear it as she did. It sounded like the hammers of h**l. This was during early spring, and we think that it was a territorial thing since spring is the only time we hear it.

I have 4 suet feeders going all the time and the woodies are leaving the houses alone. We made a suet log also, by cutting a small limb and drilling holes in it, filling the holes with homemade suet dough and hanging that away from the house. As long as we have enough feeders (suet and seed both), we have had peace and quiet. Of course, they are now bringing their young to the feeders too. It's a bit labor intensive and smacks of bribery but they are leaving the shingles and houses alone.

grayarabs
Jul. 18, 2010, 03:33 PM
You can buy - or perhaps make nesting boxes. I think that if they "bond" with the box/es they might leave your house alone - if on fact they are now in breeding mode. The boxes need to be predator proof. you could search and find lots of info on this.

JanM
Jul. 18, 2010, 06:18 PM
Where I used to work there was a woodpecker (hope it was only one loco woodpecker) that would pound on the metal parking lot light poles. And he would do it for a few mornings in a row and then quit for a week or so. The really stupid thing is that we were in a very woody area and the bird had lots of other normal targets to go after.

WhiteCamry
Jul. 20, 2010, 09:22 AM
We had one two springs in a row. Stupid bird was pecking on our metal chimney at 5 am every morning. Of course, that sound reverberated throughout the entire house! Not fun. The zillion tennis balls that the dogs leave lying around the yard, along with their ball launcher came in very, very handy. I never hit the little sh1t, although I can't say I didn't try, but I did come close and he finally gave up moved out after a few mornings of me running outside in my pjs cursing and chucking tennis balls at him.

Maybe you need something with a little more firepower (http://www.powerhourstore.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=5)?

WhiteCamry
Jul. 20, 2010, 09:23 AM
There are other kinds?:lol:
Now, now ... that's a topic for a whole other forum.
;)