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anchodavis
Jul. 6, 2010, 08:21 AM
Hi,
I posted a while back about mobile run-in shelters ... now I'm trying to decide whether to build a shelter (not mobile) or buy a mobile one. I'd prefer to have the mobility, but oy - the cost!! Is it worth it? Who has mobile shelters, how big are they, and what are the advantages? If your shelter isn't a mobile one, where did you get the plan, what's it made of and how much did it cost you to build? This is my one-year solution to bring the horse home - we're just finishing building a house and don't have money for a barn right now, so I'm just doing a shelter and pasture to start.

TaliaCristianna
Jul. 6, 2010, 08:35 AM
I have researched TONS of mobile shelters. There are some out there that are quite reasonable. I want to go mobile since our farm is constantly "evolving" and I want the option of transporting them should we decide to move things around.

I found a gentleman that sells very nice looking 10X12 sheds for around $1200 and that includes delivery. You put them together yourself but no special tools are needed. I can PM you his email address if you're interested. I'm planning on ordering a couple of them later this summer. He can do custom sizes as well. I think a 12X15 was around $2000-$2500.

Bluey
Jul. 6, 2010, 08:48 AM
We make our own horse and cattle sheds and the materials, framing metal, sheet metal and plywood liner run about $700 for a 12' by 27' shed.
Local welders make them for less than $1500.
You could ask around where you are who makes them.
Here, we had one finished in the back, were working on another:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Horses2-20-07481.jpg?t=1278420009

Here they are, in some cattle pens, two 12' by 27', set as one long shed, with a panel in the middle, as they serve two pens.
We dig a hole on each end, drop a chain with a bolt on the bottom crosswise, fill with 3 sacks of concrete mix and water and bolt or weld to the bottom of the shed, to anchor them down, important in our very high winds:
Not lined, they are for cattle:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Puppy012.jpg?t=1278420176

They are portable, you can drag them around or load them on a flat bed trailer and go anywhere with them.
For highway travel, you need to check about permits, because that may limit how deep you make them.

You may check what others come up where you live and who does it.:yes:

chai
Jul. 6, 2010, 11:43 AM
Bluey, that is a cool run in. Much as I love him, I wouldn't let Mr. Chai within twenty feet of a blow torch. He is a great horse husband, but power tools are not his friend.

So when we needed a shed, I found this incredible one at Jamaica Cottage Shop in Jamaica, VT. It came pre-made on a flatbed and they just dropped it onto the area we had prepared with gravel and stone dust. We had to buy the 10 x 12 because our local building regs. require a foundation for anything bigger than that, which would have cost as much or more than the shed.

It has lasted beautifully through ten New England summers and winters. It is made from post and beam construction with huge hooks so you can drag it with a tractor to move it, or take it with you if you move. I love it and I wish I had three more. Here's a photo and the website.
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y97/eastmeadowfarm/copieandmom.jpg
www.jamaicacottageshop.com

shakeytails
Jul. 6, 2010, 12:12 PM
Ours- http://pets.webshots.com/album/568355204kCGBUa . Size 12x24, cost about $800 to build if I remember correctly. Building material prices have gone down a little since then. No plans, DH is a carpenter and a shed like this is Carpentry 101.

If you buy a mobile shed, be sure that any exposed lumber is treated or southern yellow pine (SYP). Horses will eat common lumber like it's candy.

shakeytails
Jul. 6, 2010, 12:35 PM
Bluey, what size is the tube stock you're using? I don't think around here we could build them as cheap as you do. Last time I bought tube stock it was about $14 for a 20 foot stick of 1". I'd like one portable shed, but I wonder how long steel would last in KY's very humid weather.

baysngreys
Jul. 6, 2010, 12:45 PM
We have 3 run-ins - 2) 14'X20', 1) 14'X32'
Spent approx $6500 on labor and materials for all 3.

We hired carpenters to put in the posts and frame the roof. We bought the roofing material and Mr. Bays installed it. I installed the walls (2"X6") myself.
Eventually, we added a divider in the bigger one and gates on each end so it's now 2 "stalls".

The "pre-fab" ones I looked at cost that much EACH!

Decide how big you want it and how handy you are. Farm out as much work as you need. Screwing in boards and painting isn't rocket science. (Mr Bays doesn't think that's funny - he IS a rocket scientist!)

Bluey
Jul. 6, 2010, 01:07 PM
Bluey, what size is the tube stock you're using? I don't think around here we could build them as cheap as you do. Last time I bought tube stock it was about $14 for a 20 foot stick of 1". I'd like one portable shed, but I wonder how long steel would last in KY's very humid weather.

We used old windmill pipe for the bottom.
The square tubing my neighbor got it from his uncle, that runs an iron scrap yard.
The sheet metal, we got seconds from a company that sells to commercial builders.

If rust is a problem, how about painting the metal, so it doesn't rust?:yes:
Wood also needs to be protected where you are, I bet.;)

We are so dry here, stuff mommifies, doesn't rust or rot.:lol:

deltawave
Jul. 6, 2010, 01:16 PM
You all are giving me the urge to embark upon a summer project here . . . :)

I have the most gorgeous pasture, but there is NO shelter out there, NO shade until about 6pm, so on days when I work 11 hours I'm forced to put them in the small paddock that's attached to the sacrifice area. That paddock, after lots of grazing and lots of 11 hour days, is TIRED this summer. And all the grass in the big pasture is ungrazed and un-trodden-upon, because I haven't any shelter/shade for them out there. :sigh:

So if anyone has plans to post (or links) for a semi-DIY shelter (fixed would be OK) for 2-3 horses, I'd be grateful. :)

Lady Counselor
Jul. 6, 2010, 01:23 PM
How about the Klene Pipe frame options? Metal frame sent in a kit, you construct and cover with your own materials. I've seen a couple, they are pretty nice when finished off.
And you can dissassemble to take them with you.
(I lust after their big bale feeder!)

deltawave
Jul. 6, 2010, 01:50 PM
Thanks, LC--that's right about what I'm looking for, and they're not very far away, either. :)

magicteetango
Jul. 7, 2010, 10:40 AM
This is an awesome thread, I just forwarded it to my boyfriend and will be book marking when I get home! I love your sheds Bluey, and Shakey!

magicteetango
Jul. 7, 2010, 10:57 AM
This is an awesome thread, I just forwarded it to my boyfriend and will be book marking when I get home! I love your sheds Bluey, and Shakey!

dmalbone
Jul. 7, 2010, 11:18 AM
Bluey, that is a cool run in. Much as I love him, I wouldn't let Mr. Chai within twenty feet of a blow torch. He is a great horse husband, but power tools are not his friend.

So when we needed a shed, I found this incredible one at Jamaica Cottage Shop in Jamaica, VT. It came pre-made on a flatbed and they just dropped it onto the area we had prepared with gravel and stone dust. We had to buy the 10 x 12 because our local building regs. require a foundation for anything bigger than that, which would have cost as much or more than the shed.

It has lasted beautifully through ten New England summers and winters. It is made from post and beam construction with huge hooks so you can drag it with a tractor to move it, or take it with you if you move. I love it and I wish I had three more. Here's a photo and the website.
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y97/eastmeadowfarm/copieandmom.jpg
www.jamaicacottageshop.com

Those are gorgeous, but OUCH $$$$$$

dralthea
Jul. 9, 2010, 05:30 PM
I also brought home my 4 horses and needed 2 run in sheds, since I only have a 2-stall barn. After much research I decided to go with Hillview minibarns in Maine, I bought 2 10x10 sheds, , pre-built and delivered, for $4000. they are well, built, with southern pine kickwall on inside, and mobile with sturdy metal hooks on base of shed for towing. The neighbors have also commented on how nice they look. I had a Kleen Pipe structure built years ago and spent twice that amount on materials and labor when all was said and done.

Equibrit
Jul. 9, 2010, 06:48 PM
Doesn't the uninsulated metal run-in act like an oven in the summer, and collect condensation in the winter ?

Bluey
Jul. 9, 2010, 07:00 PM
Doesn't the uninsulated metal run-in act like an oven in the summer, and collect condensation in the winter ?

Not ours. I wonder if those would be more a concern in larger or more closed up sheds?
Never have seen condensation or dried up marks of it and it is definitely cooler in the shade.

Calvincrowe
Jul. 9, 2010, 08:47 PM
Run ins, permanent ones anyway, are pretty easy to build. If you have a friend with one you like, take pictures and measurements. Any handyman, carpenter, etc. worth his or her salt can put one up in a day or so. We built our lean-to/overhang for our barn ourselves and also a free standing one for our back porch area.

Never thought about mobile ones...

I love Bluey's--those are nice, but with horses, you'd need to line then with wood, wouldn't you?

stecia
Jul. 9, 2010, 10:28 PM
Are there degrees of mobile?

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11225308&search=horse&Mo=5&cm_re=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&Sp=S&N=5000043&whse=BC&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntk=Text_Search&Dr=P_CatalogName:BC&Ne=4000000&D=horse&Ntt=horse&No=4&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Nty=1&topnav=&s=1

MistyBlue
Jul. 9, 2010, 10:53 PM
Do check out the Klene Pipe types. Can be mobil or stationary, however you want them. The wood added is heavy enough to keep them in place (unless you get a hurricane or tornado) and you can easily add trailer ties to hold them down.
To move around the property, pull up ties and drag it with a tractor no problem. To move it to a new property, unscrew the wood, disassemble and take it with you.

I'm not very handy at all and helped a couple people put these up in no time. Easy peasy! Tells you how to cut the wood and had built on tabs to attach the wood to. It's like building a large popsicle-stick house! :D

Bluey
Jul. 9, 2010, 11:16 PM
Run ins, permanent ones anyway, are pretty easy to build. If you have a friend with one you like, take pictures and measurements. Any handyman, carpenter, etc. worth his or her salt can put one up in a day or so. We built our lean-to/overhang for our barn ourselves and also a free standing one for our back porch area.

Never thought about mobile ones...

I love Bluey's--those are nice, but with horses, you'd need to line then with wood, wouldn't you?

Yes, we use 3/4" exterior plywood to line them for horses.
For cattle, sometimes we add one low, horizontal bump bar.

Those reddish bars inside are just to steady it to drag or haul, they come off once in place.

Those are really very easy and quick to make.

shakeytails
Jul. 9, 2010, 11:20 PM
Are there degrees of mobile?

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11225308&search=horse&Mo=5&cm_re=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&Sp=S&N=5000043&whse=BC&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntk=Text_Search&Dr=P_CatalogName:BC&Ne=4000000&D=horse&Ntt=horse&No=4&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Nty=1&topnav=&s=1

I wonder how long it would take my Percheron to destroy one of those things rubbing her butt on it. I'd give it 3 days, tops, if one of my other idjits didn't find it great fun to shed it to pieces first!

Calvincrowe
Jul. 9, 2010, 11:21 PM
Ah, Bluey, another reason Mr. CC will want to buy that welder he keeps whining about.:lol: Of course, we have so little land right now a run in makes no sense (barn overhang works great), but if I do in my poor old mama ;), I'll be sure to buy enough land adjacent to our farm to put cattle on and then Mr. CC can pick your brain on how to weld that sucker together.

foundationmare
Jul. 10, 2010, 02:49 PM
I had a chuckle the other day on my commute to work. I noticed that a house about midway was putting up some nice wood fencing. Slow going, but it certainly looked like it would be a paddock. So about a week ago the fence is finished and there are two horses in it. It's been hoo-boy hot here and the horses had no shade. So yesterday I saw that there is one of those ubiquitous patio canopy things in the paddock, you know the kind you get at Home Depot or Walmart. I thought it was kind of clever. Don't know how long it will last but, hey, any port in a storm! Naturally the horses were out in the sun...

anchodavis
Jul. 12, 2010, 01:02 PM
Thanks all... I had talked to the guy at Klene Pipe a while back and think I'm going with that option. I sure hope the instructions are idiot-proof! Will report back when we have something in motion...

anchodavis
Jul. 29, 2010, 02:15 PM
I just got my Klene Pipe shed materials today. If anyone is a true test of this mobile kit idea being idiot-proof, it'll be me. Will report back soon - can't get going till the county makes up its mind whether I have to get a permit or not (apparently not too many mobile sheds around here!). Anyhow, the whole package delivered was just over $3200 for their "Wrangler" structure - which is made to be a little more economical than some of their others. I did not get quotes on others. It's also set up so you can put stall fronts on and center divide them if needed.

MistyBlue
Jul. 29, 2010, 03:48 PM
That model is very handy. And somewhat dangerous.
The dangerous part is that it can be easily converted into a shedrow barn instead of a run in. And we all know what easy-to-get extra stalls mean! Magically new horses pop up in them sooner or later, LOL!

Let us know how it goes. I helped someone put together a Klene run in shed, and I'm an enormous idiot at building stuff. However...I was *helping* and was surrounded by actual handy people. (and still not sure how much help I actually was) But I have to admit it seemed pretty simple when I was helping.

That's a shocker that your county may require a permit for a portable shelter!
Do they have a size limit on outbuildings before requiring a permit?

My town is uber-strict on what they require permits on. However, while they have a long list of stuff that requires permits, they're also very willing to give out those permits. They're just looking for improvements for adding property taxes and want you to put up whatever it is you're putting up. Sounds crappy but in reality it's a very small town without any real business in it so property taxes are pretty much their only income and they do a lot with those taxes and we see the benefits. (still painful to pay them though sometimes)

Our rule for outbuildings is that anything over 10 x 10 requires a solid foundation *and* permit for taxing purposes. Even if the building itself doesn't require a foundation like a Klene doesn't, town requires you to put it on a pad and attach it. However it only applies to 4 sided buildings and not 3 sided run in sheds.

Which might explain all the garages around here that are vehicle run in (drive in?) sheds without front walls or doors, LOL!

ETA...if possible take photos to share?

wsmoak
Jul. 29, 2010, 04:00 PM
I just got my Klene Pipe shed materials today.

Mine will be on its way soon! I got the heavier duty one that doesn't come with siding, 12x24.

The rule here is you don't need a permit if it's under 800 square feet. I could fit two stalls and some storage in a 24x33...

anchodavis
Jul. 29, 2010, 04:26 PM
Just heard back from the county - no permit required (phew!) They do have a rule that you're supposed to have a permit even for sheds if they're over 200 square feet, but since it's for ag use, I guess there is an exemption? I do still have to have the township zoning compliance officer out there to sign off on setbacks, but that's easy - nice guy named Bill who works part time at the farm council grounds. Assuming he can come by tomorrow afternoon, I should be able to get started assembling maybe tomorrow! Now I just need to find some poor nice farmer with an auger to help me dig 40 post holes so poor DH and I don't have to do it by hand. :eek: Being tractor-less stinks!!
MistyBlue, will do on photos. If I can find out camera. Just moved out to the new place Monday and can't even find the dang coffee filters. :lol:

sketcher
Jul. 29, 2010, 09:56 PM
Do check out the Klene Pipe types. Can be mobil or stationary, however you want them. The wood added is heavy enough to keep them in place (unless you get a hurricane or tornado) and you can easily add trailer ties to hold them down.
To move around the property, pull up ties and drag it with a tractor no problem. To move it to a new property, unscrew the wood, disassemble and take it with you.

I'm not very handy at all and helped a couple people put these up in no time. Easy peasy! Tells you how to cut the wood and had built on tabs to attach the wood to. It's like building a large popsicle-stick house! :D

I second that.

To stake them down we had a 3/4 horseshoe welded to rerod. Hammered in the rerod over the ground poles and held them down with the hook created by the shoes...if that makes any sense.

MistyBlue
Jul. 29, 2010, 10:10 PM
MistyBlue, will do on photos. If I can find out camera. Just moved out to the new place Monday and can't even find the dang coffee filters. :lol:

Whoa, no coffee??? That's not a laughing matter! :winkgrin:
Glad to hear no permits, hope it goes up easily for you. We have a bunch of them (and similar but different brand local types) around here. Very common as a fast, inexpensive and easy way to add under roof storage, a barn or a run in shelter anywhere. I'm thinking of one eventually for tractor storage/garage and possibly a pre-built shedrow or run in farther down the road for the wooded lot on the other side of my house. That could double as either extra storage (never enough of that) or as a QT spot well away from my main barn and turnouts for any new horses coming in.


To stake them down we had a 3/4 horseshoe welded to rerod. Hammered in the rerod over the ground poles and held them down with the hook created by the shoes...if that makes any sense.

I think it makes sense...kind of like making an all steel "walking cane" and using that as an anchor? That's not a bad idea. Probably more solid than trailer tie anchors.

wsmoak
Aug. 13, 2010, 02:35 PM
I should be able to get started assembling maybe tomorrow!

It's here!! I have a bunch of pipe lengths with tabs sticking up all over lying in my field, a box of nuts and bolts, a sheaf of paper and a DVD to watch.

Hey anchodavis, how did your assembly go?

Nanerpus
Aug. 15, 2010, 08:58 AM
I also brought home my 4 horses and needed 2 run in sheds, since I only have a 2-stall barn. After much research I decided to go with Hillview minibarns in Maine, I bought 2 10x10 sheds, , pre-built and delivered, for $4000. they are well, built, with southern pine kickwall on inside, and mobile with sturdy metal hooks on base of shed for towing. The neighbors have also commented on how nice they look. I had a Kleen Pipe structure built years ago and spent twice that amount on materials and labor when all was said and done.

I bought the same ones, we have purchased 7 from them over the years and they are great sheds! Even the smaller singles are just fine for my girls:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=33810206&l=b17fdd0302&id=13002359

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=33347211&l=9201a41ac9&id=13002359

Watermark Farm
Aug. 15, 2010, 01:32 PM
We've done both.

The cheapest to build was a pole shelter done with some salvaged/leftover wood I already had.

The most expensive to build was a pole shelter done with new wood. Once I factored in labor to build it, I could have put up a kit shelter for less.

I like permanent shelters because they are more solid, but those kit shelters have the very attractive bonus of being moveable. I've found more than once that we've put up a permanent shed and I wished I could move it a year or two later.

If you do the kit shelter, go with 3/4" plywood sides instead of the T-111 siding they often talk you into. If you put a little extra into some corner trim, etc. on either kind you can wind up with a handsome structure.

lawndart
Aug. 15, 2010, 03:02 PM
As some one else noted above, building a run-in is Carpentry 101 :)

Most counties have a Vocational-Technical School. I suggest you contact your Carpentry/Welding teachers, tell them you want one (or two, or three) with approximate dimensions, and photos thereof. Be sure to mention the kick boards inside. They are always looking for simple building projects for the lst year students.

Ask if their price to build includes materials, because they can probably get the materials cheaper. Also, can they deliver, or will they build on site? If they can build on-site, great. The kids should be covered by the school insurance. Are they willing to paint it too?

Maybe Vo-tech's aren't doing projects like this anymore, but they are here, so it doesn't hurt to check. :yes:

MistyBlue
Aug. 15, 2010, 04:01 PM
Great idea having a vo-ag team/students over to build one as a project!

Nanerpus, those single run ins are cute as heck!

So how is everyone's shed building going? Oh, and we want photos on completion! :yes: :)

wsmoak
Aug. 22, 2010, 10:44 PM
I like permanent shelters because they are more solid, but those kit shelters have the very attractive bonus of being moveable. I've found more than once that we've put up a permanent shed and I wished I could move it a year or two later.


That's why I went with the Klene Pipe structure. We're starting from scratch with the horsey infrastructure here and I'm *sure* I'll get the thing faced in the wrong direction at least, if not in the wrong place entirely.

The pipe structure went together really quickly, and we've been doing the rest as time allows. DH insisted on doubling all the 2x4's plus counter sinking everything, so that took extra time.

This weekend we got all the rafters up and about half of the plywood and felt for the roof. We should be able to get that finished and get the shingles on next weekend.

Not so thrilled with their materials list which wanted 14' boards (nobody sells those... you can only get 12' or 16' here.)

anchodavis
Aug. 23, 2010, 11:44 AM
Ours is coming along - slowly! The pipe frame went up fast and then we put the rafters on. We got sidetracked with the fence project (I'm trying to move two horses here by the end of this month - deadline pressure!!). I had to dig 61 post holes in hard clay for electrobraid fence and hired a guy - he stopped showing up after day 2 (dug a total of 6 holes only and they weren't even deep enough - glad I hadn't paid him!! :no:) So then I hired another guy who didn't show up at all, so I gave up and rented a bobcat and DH and I dug all 61 last weekend. Phew. Have about 2/3 set, then string the rope and ground wire and that's done.
Yesterday DH's back needed a break from fencework so we worked on the shed for a while and added all the double 2x4s... all that's left is roof and siding (might be able to get part of it done tonite! I would not say it's been 100% idiot proof, there are some steps in the directions that aren't very well explained, but overall it's been pretty easy. My siding is smartboard and I think I have to cut all of it, so we'll see how that goes! I've got some pics, just haven't had time to upload them anywhere yet, but will do so soon!:yes:
One question - I've noticed the sides don't come down as close to the ground as I'd like for safety - how have people remedied this? I was thinking about trying to figure out a way to fasten some 3" poles or something along the sides as a sort of anti-casting device...

wsmoak
Aug. 31, 2010, 09:45 AM
One question - I've noticed the sides don't come down as close to the ground as I'd like for safety - how have people remedied this? I was thinking about trying to figure out a way to fasten some 3" poles or something along the sides as a sort of anti-casting device...

In the video that came with it they show attaching the plywood kickboard to the inside, and then screwing on another piece to cover the space between the bar and the ground. You definitely don't want to leave it open, but you need to be able to remove it if you want to drag the building elsewhere.

Here are photos of the progress on mine: http://www.flickr.com/photos/10803470@N00/sets/72157624790649688/

Our biggest problem has been that it's not square. We got it within a quarter inch at the *bottom* but we should have also squared it at the top and across the roof.

We got the first run of shingles done on the front and back last night. I just need help to snap chalk lines and I can do the rest of that myself.

For the siding I'm hoping to do board and batten (or maybe just 'board' :) ) using lumber we've milled here on the property. We have some gorgeous red oak, but I almost hate to put it up on a horse shelter!

DiablosHalo
Sep. 30, 2010, 09:16 AM
I'm about to order the materials for the run in sheds. I have a contractor to build them. But.. I need a materials list. Not blueprints but just materials needed so I can buy them all and he can build. (as previously mentioned- sheds are wicked easy to build but I can't blindly count 2x6s needed!).

Anyone have a materials list for a 12x36 run in? (12x30 would be fine too). I'm googling online for plans/lists but can not find any reputable company- ugh.

Pennywell Bay
Sep. 30, 2010, 09:31 AM
I'm about to order the materials for the run in sheds. I have a contractor to build them. But.. I need a materials list. Not blueprints but just materials needed so I can buy them all and he can build. (as previously mentioned- sheds are wicked easy to build but I can't blindly count 2x6s needed!).

Anyone have a materials list for a 12x36 run in? (12x30 would be fine too). I'm googling online for plans/lists but can not find any reputable company- ugh.

The contractor should be able to tell you what materials to buy so you have exactly what they want!

Bluey
Sep. 30, 2010, 10:30 AM
I'm about to order the materials for the run in sheds. I have a contractor to build them. But.. I need a materials list. Not blueprints but just materials needed so I can buy them all and he can build. (as previously mentioned- sheds are wicked easy to build but I can't blindly count 2x6s needed!).

Anyone have a materials list for a 12x36 run in? (12x30 would be fine too). I'm googling online for plans/lists but can not find any reputable company- ugh.

Most contractors I know can do that in their sleep.
There are also CAD computer programs that will do it for you and practically every contractor I know has some and knows how to use them.

Even Home Depot and Lowes and many straight lumberyards have people that would assist you with that, most also have those basic CAD programs.

You can do that yourself too.:yes: