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eventr4life
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:05 PM
I've been looking for my next horse for quite some time now, and STILL haven't found it! How can this be?
I have looked on dreamhorse, at shows, talked with people, etc. I almost think I am being too picky. Is that possible? If i ride a horse and dont like something about it, but it can be fixed should i proceed?
I guess i have just approached the part where i want to quit because it's so draining.
What do you guys do to help with the horse search? What are your theories on 'perfect horses'?

BestHorses
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:22 PM
Finding the right horse is impossible! Hang in there. Even though there's no such thing as a perfect horse, when I was tired of the search and I went ahead with an *almost* perfect horse thinking I could make do, it ended up being a terrible decision. :(

Keep doing what you're doing and let everyone you meet know you're looking. The best ones always seem to get sold without ever needing an ad. Meanwhile, the longer you don't have a horse the more money you can save and increase your budget. ;)

EiRide
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:30 PM
I guess it depends on what you mean by 'can I be too picky.'

If that means that you are not being realistic about what your budget will allow, then yes, you are too picky. :-) If it means that you pass on horses if you don't feel a certain spark and draw about them, then no, you are not too picky.

I looked at about 45 horses in two and a half months, lots of which had zero eventing back ground, last time I went shopping. I found a miserably failed Western Pleasure mare, never jumped and barely ridden out of the ring, 9 yrs old. I knew immediately she was The One. One decade later and a nice filly, plus miles of trails, solid First Level in dressage competing, and up to Training level eventing under our girth, I've never been sorry.

maxxtrot
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:34 PM
well, that all depends on what you are looking for and what is your budget?and where you are looking. sometimes the nice horses are not with big name trainers. tell everyone who will listen what you are looking for. get the word around.

scubed
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:39 PM
When I bought my second horse (the first was sort of a fluke. I wasn't really looking), I inquired/looked at video etc of 140+ and sat on 38 of those. When I sat on #38, I knew he was mine. Never regretted that decision at all. After he moved on, the next horse I bought was the 4th horse I sat on and I never regretted that either. When he had to be retired, I bought the next one on just a picture and a conversation, but knew he was right. He is a tough little bugger, but I totally love him. You need to be realistic, but that "spark" can not be overstated especially if you are an ammy like I am and have one horse to compete and hang out with.

kinnip
Jul. 2, 2010, 10:19 PM
I was feeling pretty discouraged when looking for my latest purchase. I had been toying with the idea of buying an OTTB I saw online. I looked and looked at his pics and video. I couldn't get enough of looking at this horse. My trainer at the time really hated TBs in general, OTTBs were high on her list of horses to avoid, so I did. Ultimately, I got tired of waiting for that really nice and miraculously affordable WB, so I called about the OTTB. I knew when I talked to the broker (no, not a kill "broker") that he was going to be right for me. Things went a little sideways for awhile and I thought someone else was going to buy him before I even got a chance to ride him. Serendipity was on my side though, and I finally got to ride this wonderfully imperfect horse.
He doesn't have any major issues, mostly he just needs re-training and experience. He has movement that's good enough to win a couple of ribbons and he melts my heart. I knew the second I slid into the saddle that he was the one. I haven't regretted him for a second. Out of all the horses I perused and called on, for a good six months, he was the first I actually sat on. It was kismet.

RebeccaB
Jul. 2, 2010, 10:49 PM
I dont understand this forum stuff, and I am trying to navigate on a dial up computer to top it off! I read stories about this person trying so hard to find the right horse, and I feel like I have one to share for free...can someone out there tell me how I let eventers/dressage riders know about my 6yr. old Friesian cross mare, who is free to use to the right, motivated rider? (I don't want her to get messed up with bad training or poor handling!) Help! Rebecca in NC:confused:

netg
Jul. 3, 2010, 12:33 AM
Rebecca - your best bet is contacting local respected trainers who will help ensure a responsible good home for your horse.


I think it can be VERY hard to find a horse.... or you can be lucky and find the perfect horse immediately. I meant to buy a horse around mid-summer, and started looking in April just to get an idea of what was out there. I got my guy March 1.

I have spent more than 6 months looking for a horse in the past. Heck, my mom was looking for a trail horse and took more than 6 months to find one, driving around the state to look at horses. I agree with the earlier posts that if you want too much for your budget you're being too picky, but otherwise - wanting the horse who is right for you isn't being too picky.

slp2
Jul. 3, 2010, 12:36 AM
Hmmm. Yes, I think you can be too picky (assuming your budget is not limitless). I have a friend who has been looking for about 2 years and NO HORSE seems to be good enough. And the ones she likes, she isn't willing to pay the price for (even though she claims to have the money). She seems to always find some flaw in every horse she looks at.

In the meantime, I looked at only a few horses and bought a youngster that I thought I could work with and enjoy (but no--not my "dream horse"). Her movement was pretty mediocre and she wasn't as big as I wanted. Well, she has turned out to be a really fun horse. In fact, today we went for a x-c school, and she was brave, honest, and taking me to the x-c jumps (and she just turned 4). And, her movement has improved hugely now that we have been doing dressage work and gaining strength. I am pretty sure she is going to end up being a nice event horse for me. But on the day I tried her--I did not think, "this is THE one". Instead, I thought: "I can work with this one and see how she turns out." She had 2 good qualities (her jumping form and her brain) and the rest was going to be "work in progress".

Same thing with my older horse (who I adore and is very special). My first ride on her was just "ok" but I took her on trial and in 2 weeks I knew I HAD to buy her. But it wasn't that way from ride #1.

So sometimes you need to "build your own" by getting a horse that is sound and has a good brain (and is in your budget) and then get good training for yourself and the horse. You would be surprised how some of the most "ho hum" horses can really be improved by your own correct and consistent work.

Equine Adhesive
Jul. 3, 2010, 03:54 AM
Some of it depends on luck- but if you know what you are looking for, then generally, yes, it will take longer. Chances are, you've either owned multiple horses before, or you have ridden enough different horses to know what you DON'T want-- and often it is what you don't want that makes the process of buying a long one!

There can be the case of being too judgmental- picking apart the previous training a horse has had when the horse still has potential for your interests, for example. Or, being unrealistic on the vetting and expecting it to vet perfect in all areas. Or, having a difference of opinion with a trainer who has other plans for you and your money (happens sometimes- but we hope this is an exception!). Etc.

When I was last looking, I looked casually and kept "an eye out", as I was busy doing other things and was not in a rush to buy. The total time looking was about 5 months, and I knew the type of horse I wanted, and I was on a budget (think green ottb budget). I had 1 vetted early on, did not pan out. I looked at some others, and looked at many ads/videos. I considered buying sight-unseen because I was looking for a "type" horse, but I preferred to buy seen, so I could get a feel for the horse and his personality.

Well, I got lucky. I saw an ad for a horse still on the track -it LITERALLY said FOUR words and showed a cell-phone pic of him standing by the shedrow- I could tell he was decently built but not much else. My SO happened to be making a trip near that track soon. I talked him into stopping to see the horse, expecting nothing much from the side-trip. When we saw him in the stall, he looked cute and was friendly, but did not seem to be a knockout or anything. Then the barn help took him out to jog and he took on another presence and was suddenly floating in-hand with a wonderful, naturally balanced uphill frame, and I suddenly saw a glimpse of what he COULD be after proper conditioning and development.
After 5 months of looking, I knew this horse had the qualities important to me (well-balanced naturally, light on his feet, light in the bridle/snaffle mouth, pretty/kind-eyed, uphill build, long neck & it set on well, dressage/event type rather than hunter type, sensible, friendly, well-mannered, sane) , and while he is not perfect, I have not looked back and wished I got another horse. I have hopes that he will work out for my plans, but as a prospect, so far he is doing his job beautifully and I am happy I stuck to my original raw criteria instead of settling for something different from what I wanted. As with people, I am sure there are other horses that would have worked for me, but also as with people, this one was at the right time at the right place and also happened to be what I was looking for- so it worked. Maybe try not to find "the one" but instead try to find the one that fulfills your reasonable list of requirements. :)

graytbmare
Jul. 3, 2010, 07:29 AM
I have hopes that he will work out for my plans, but as a prospect, so far he is doing his job beautifully and I am happy I stuck to my original raw criteria instead of settling for something different from what I wanted. As with people, I am sure there are other horses that would have worked for me, but also as with people, this one was at the right time at the right place and also happened to be what I was looking for- so it worked. Maybe try not to find "the one" but instead try to find the one that fulfills your reasonable list of requirements. :)

Agree with this pretty much. After I lost my last horse, I wasnt even really shopping but more making a list in my head of the traits I wanted, ie. soundness, conf., age, height, brain ect. I knew the range I wanted those in, but like you might be being, I was too specific. I sat on a few, even one that would have been, with a month of work, a lovely novice/ training horse winning the dressage and going double clean. But he was the easy road to take and I didnt get him because there was no AHA! moment when I rode him. He was missing a spark that I think event horses need.

I ended up with a horse that I most likely would have not even looked at if I had just seen him on paper, but my trainer and I walked by his stall and by chance asked to see him out of it. I gave up one of my major requirements, age (which had been 4-7), because he is 3. Looking back though, it was actually perfect because I dont have the finances to compete after all the vet bills from my last horse and the purchase of the new one. Plus, Im getting to bond with Levi and really start from the beginning, which is one of the coolest experiences.

I think you will just know when you see him. I know, everyone said that to me too "you'll just know when you are ready" "you'll know if hes the right horse" blah blah blah. I honestly didnt believe them. But then I spent a weekend away at a horse show worrying that he would be sold before I got back and the few days before the vet check worrying that he was missing a lung or something freaky. Thats pretty much when I knew he was the horse. When you loose 10lbs from worrying about not get getting him, then its a safe bet its "the horse". :lol:

ThirdCharm
Jul. 3, 2010, 08:22 AM
It so depends on your criteria.

Let's start with what EVERYONE (almost) wants: Yes, finding a 100% sound, big, fancy, young, WB/TB, gelding, well-trained Prelim-or-up prospect, even better with experience, suitable for an amateur, on a budget, is hard.

Every aspect that you can "give" on makes it easier. What kind of sticking points are you running into?

Jennifer

gold2012
Jul. 3, 2010, 08:50 AM
I think you have to look for that "spark" everyone is saying, but I also warn, be realistic.

Somoene once came out to our place, to look at this mare I had for sale. This mare went to AEC's in Training, won a ribbon, and was absolutely a LOVE. She was somewhat small...may e 15.2, or 15.3.

Anyway, these people came out in the pouring rain, in 40 degrees. Pulled off the blanket, put her in cross ties, and proceeded to get her ready. Well, you know how cold 40 is in freezing wet weather? Anyway, she stood with her hip cocked, eyes half closed, till they got her tacked up. Went out into the pouring rain with this 12 year old kid, and hacked her all over the place, jumped her around 3 foot, highest the girl had jumped, and mare did NOTHING wrong. They were looking for a Novice horse, and MAYBE, and it was a strong MAYBE, training at some point or other. BTW, standing water 6 inches deep. But it was the only day they could come.

It was a perfect match. That mare took wonderful care of this little girl. Then when her mom got on, did the same. But they passed on her. WHY? Oh they loved her, and the trainer loved her enough to bring her own 8 year old to try her, but it was too much horse for them. They passed because she was a roarer. She had a slight roaring problem. She wasn't full paralyzed, but she was a bit loud. We competed that mare in TR3D's and never had issues, but they passed on that reason. It worked out in the end, as I sold her to an amateur woman who just ADORES her, and I know she has a good home forever. BUT, if you get so picky that when the perfect horse does come along, and all, then you might never find one.


Good Luck.

riderboy
Jul. 3, 2010, 08:53 AM
I've found looking for a new horse to be a huge pain in the rear. There are occasional bright moments, but generally it's a slog. People you think you can trust become untrustworthy, there at times seems very little correlation between price and value and it can be expensive. I'd rather give birth to a flaming porcupine. And I'm not even the right gender.

retreadeventer
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:02 AM
If you're looking for an event prospect -- here's my advice -- don't look anywhere you might find event prospects! Sounds crazy but what you REALLY need to to do is educate yourself a bit on what an event prospect should be, and should look like, FOR YOU, and what you want to RIDE vs. what you want to look at. Those beautiful movers and sharp jumpers are NOT easy to ride, nor are they always sound. Someone works hard on those horses.

No matter how experienced and smart, a trainer is always going to gravitate towards horses THEY like to ride and train and work with. When you go to an event barn, you're looking at a selection of pre-choiced horses -- that one person (not you) ended up with. Now sometimes you can find the right one at such a barn but most times unless that person is your clone, you just have to fit with one and that's a chance proposition, as most of the posters above said. (Scubed for one).

Take a second look at EiRide's post. You really do need to know something about conformation and what you are looking at before you go looking. (EiRide didn't mention she's a long-time rider with a couple decades experience, too.) She knows what she can ride.

If you aren't sure what you can ride, get an evaluation from a GOOD upper level professional. Take a lesson. Ask them afterwards for a true assessment of your skills. Ask them what kind of horse they would look for, for you -- where to start, what to do. I don't know a professional event trainer that wouldn't be happy to help you.

Use the search process as a learning experience. Ask yourself after every trial, what did I learn as a rider from that horse? How did that horse feel after I (applied the aids, stopped using my leg, went outside the ring, etc.), and what did he look like with someone else on him -- how did he move? How is that horse's movement, and training, related to my likes and dislikes? This will help you narrow down what you really like and what you can live with. Only YOU will know that.

Event prospects can be found everywhere. I always tell people, start within a one hour radius of your own home. Check out the little schooling shows and yes, games shows and maybe charity trail rides. Call your local warmblood breeder. Foxhunters, paper chases. Hunter jumper lesson barns. The local penny saver advertiser. Hey, it's not gonna say "Event prospect, 6yo, trained to 1st level, jumps 3', sound", it's gonna say, "6yo QH cross G., needs riding, green", or "5yo mare, TW/Arab cross, too spunky for beginner rider" etc. (I went to look at an ad exactly like that once and saw this gorgeous strawberry roan daisy cutter mover trotting across the pasture and it took my breath away. We set some junk up against a fence post and gypped her over a jump and I nearly fainted -- knees to the chin, soft loose back, snapped up her hocks -- I got her for $600 and sold her a year later to a PC rider who wanted to get her B rating for let's just say add another zero on there, and she's still packing around hunter courses.) Lauren Keiffer just clocked around Rolex on an Arabian! Chat with the feed store clerk and the tack store owners, masters of your local foxhunt, etc. I found a horse in the backyard of a friend, that wasn't advertised, and from all accounts he's going to make a great event prospect.

When you find something, take a friend with you who can video you riding the horse and study it afterwards. Ask questions. First impressions are important, record your own first impressions of each horse. Your mind will say, "yuck" or "hmm, this is interesting" the first time you see the horse's head over the stall door. Remember those feelings. Wouldn't hurt to keep a notebook or private blog.

My BIGGEST and most important advice: know horses, educate yourself as to what you see vs. what you are sitting on. I don't think most riders are picky -- I think they don't know what to look for. Be open minded!

Bogie
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:06 AM
I think when you are looking for "the" horse it can become paralyzing because there are going to be some tradeoffs unless you have a ton of money.

When I bought my Trakehner he was going to be "the" horse. I probably sat on 25 horses and the ones I loved I couldn't afford. He came with some training issues but was worth it.

I've also bought several OTTB project horses. In those cases I was looking for good conformation, a good brain and an easy going temperament. Since they weren't supposed to be lifetime horses I didn't sweat over it and generally bought one of the first ones I saw. They all turned into darn nice horses. I just hadn't put so much pressure on myself to find the absolutely right one.

My current horse I took sight unseen from CANTER New England to foster and the director told me he was going to be really nice. He didn't look like much when I picked him up but he's turned out to be a great horse. In fact, I told her that the next time I need a horse I'm just going to have her drop one off.

Tux61096
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:11 AM
I've found looking for a new horse to be a huge pain in the rear. . . . I'd rather give birth to a flaming porcupine. And I'm not even the right gender.


Cracked me up this morning! Thanks for that. :lol::D:lol:

GotSpots
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:31 AM
I don't know if you are being too picky, but gosh, there sure are a lot of folks who are. It does, of course, depend on what you are looking for, but in my experience, I've found the folks who are looking for career lower level horses and/or trail horses to sometimes have the most unrealistic expectations either of what their budget would buy or even of what they'd need.

For example, we had a nice little novice/training horse - he wasn't ever going to go Prelim, but he was sweet, kind, dead easy, the right age/size, and priced fairly. He wasn't particularly pretty and didn't have a strong personality, but was a full on good soul. The number of folks we had who were looking for their first novice horse who passed on him because they didn't "feel a connection" or he "wasn't a 10 mover" was unreal. This horse was a total gem, and took fabulous care of them, and time and again I saw folks pass him up for something completely unsuitable for their professed goals (the 3 year old 17hh sway backed cribbing OTTB filly who was barred from the track for being dangerous - for someone's kid to be a first Novice horse - was a particularly notable example). We finally got him sold to a fabulous family whose kid is just having a blast with him.

No horse is perfect. Every horse will have something about them - maybe they're not going to win the dressage, or they have some jewelry on their xrays or they're the wrong color (true story) or a year too old or not particularly pretty or what have you. But there are an awful lot of solid citizens out there even with those things who can do a job really really well and be a lot of fun, and frankly, if the horse has one of those issues and is still doing the job you want them to do, it's likely something you can live with. I don't look for the perfect personality - I look for a horse that is doing the job I want them to do (or has the potential for a youngster). Personality grows with horses - heck, my Prelim horse, who I absolutely adore, had ZERO personality when we got him. He's still a pretty internalized dude, but after a couple of years with him, I am certain he's a diamond and wouldn't trade him for the world. And I don't think he's all that unique - there really are so many good ones out there. If you're not finding them at all, it's a good opportunity to rethink what your budget is and what your must-have criteria are.

That being said, the process certainly can be frustrating. The number of times I've had horses not be what they are advertised to be is sometimes stunning (note, "experienced Preliminary horse" does not mean it did one Prelim and didn't get past the second fence. Just sayin'). 'Course, it's not really all that different from having folks send horses who are actually limping to a vet check . . .

Bogie
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:54 AM
'Course, it's not really all that different from having folks send horses who are actually limping to a vet check . . .

:lol::lol: Sadly, too true.

Then there are the 16.2 horses that are 15.2 with shoes . . . the horses that you can see have been lunged into a lather before you arrived . . . the horses that are three legged lame and being ridden by the trainer . . . who then admits "he doesn't always go like this".

Once again, I just want my next horse dropped off at the barn. if it doesn't work out, I'll sell it.

EiRide
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:59 AM
I don't know if you are being too picky, but gosh, there sure are a lot of folks who are. It does, of course, depend on what you are looking for, but in my experience, I've found the folks who are looking for career lower level horses and/or trail horses to sometimes have the most unrealistic expectations either of what their budget would buy or even of what they'd need.

Oh, I hate that! I had a little girl who wanted to buy a nice mare I was selling--15 hand QH, could easily do Novice with this kid, who rode her in lessons with my coach for several months and fell in love. They were a great match. I think she was about 10 or 11 at the time.

The dad decided he wanted to learn to ride too, and that the little mare was too small for him. He went out and bought a 17 hand OTTB so that they could share the horse.

Bet you know how THAT worked out in the long run . . .

shawneeAcres
Jul. 3, 2010, 10:04 AM
My suggestion:

Make a list of what you MUST have, what you WANT to have, and what would be nice but you could either "fix" or live without. BE REALISTIC.

Then, On each horse that you try out (or even maybe do this on the intial prospects to determine if worth looking at) make a WRITTEN LIST beside your original "specs" for each horse. Very quickly you will begin to see if you are being realistic or not! And you will find out that there are some things that you THOUGHT were must or nice "to haves" that you can either deal with or work on fixing. Obviosuly, your price range will have a LOT to do with how much you may find on your list!!!!

I wish more people that came and looked would do this simple exercise. I also ask a LOT of questions of prospective buyers before I make an appt to try and make sure that at least this is a possible fit. But people are not always "truthful" either knowingly, or more likely than not, without knowing it. I showed a cute little mare to someone just last week, they DEMANDED to come and look at the horse. It was for a young girl (in her 20's) mother. THey wanted a GREY had to be grey. THis mare is 11 yr old and has basically tunred mostly white/flea bitten. I sent them photos of her etc. THe girl came and looked for her mom, mare did super (considering she has not been in work for a couple years due to prior owner going to college) and girl REALLY liked her. I did a video for her to show to her mom. Mom says horse is a NICE mover, jsut whats she wants EXCEP she is "too white" and older than she wanted. OK so WTF? WHY did daughter come and look, you already knew price and what "color" of grey she was. So this was unrealistic, and frankly a silly reaason to turn down a nice horse, and personally wasted my time, plus the daughter drove almost and hour both ways. FInd out Mom has been looking for a long time, well duh, ESPECIALLY when you considered the price range!

kinnip
Jul. 3, 2010, 10:05 AM
Oh, I hate that! I had a little girl who wanted to buy a nice mare I was selling--15 hand QH, could easily do Novice with this kid, who rode her in lessons with my coach for several months and fell in love. They were a great match. I think she was about 10 or 11 at the time.

The dad decided he wanted to learn to ride too, and that the little mare was too small for him. He went out and bought a 17 hand OTTB so that they could share the horse.

Bet you know how THAT worked out in the long run . . .

I know we're getting off track here, but I absolutely HATE that. :mad: I've watched a couple of parents destroy their kids interest in riding that way. Adults should know better.

HappyRiding
Jul. 3, 2010, 10:26 AM
Luckily for me, the last time I went horse shopping I found the one after three horses on day two of searching. She was a little big for me but she was a young, 10 gaits, handy wb/tb, had evented up to prelim with alot more to go, winning dressage, with an awesome positive attitude and was searching for fences as I trotted her around in the arena first time I got on her. When we started jumping I couldn't stop smiling because I already knew that she was the horse I wanted. Unfortunately she was out of our price range by just 1k so we looked at a few more horses that day but didn't find one as good as her. Next day we decided ask the woman with my horse to come back with her anyway after deciding that if she was 'the horse' we could afford just paying alittle more. We went out cross country and the first jump we did, she bunny hopped over-something my previous horse was known for doing at the barn. My mom turned to my trainer and said, "That's our horse," and luckily for us the horse passed the vet check with flying colors and was in our barn the next week.

Despite having very fast experiences with the market, I have friends who have been looking for over a year and vetting multiple 'this is the one' horses and learned from them that the best thing you can do is know how much you are willing to spend and what you can really afford. My friend was recently very torn about not buying a horse because even though it was perfect for her and in her price range the up keep for the horse wasn't something she could do. She decided to pass and two days later found a horse that was even more perfect for her then the one she was torn up about.

Another thing I know is helpful is having another person looking for you. We ended up hiring someone to just bring in every single horse she could get that fit what I needed. We got a list of 30 horses from her and then she added to that list to 40 after seeing me ride and we would have never known about our horse if she hadn't been helping us. Even your friends looking for you would help alot. Don't get discouraged if it takes a long time though because if you end up thinking, "What the heck, I've been looking for a year this horse will work," then it turns out you and the horse just clash terribly and it's not fun for either of you.

judybigredpony
Jul. 3, 2010, 12:44 PM
I've been looking for my next horse for quite some time now, and STILL haven't found it! How can this be?
I have looked on dreamhorse, at shows, talked with people, etc. I almost think I am being too picky. Is that possible? If i ride a horse and dont like something about it, but it can be fixed should i proceed?
I guess i have just approached the part where i want to quit because it's so draining.
What do you guys do to help with the horse search? What are your theories on 'perfect horses'?

Help us help you by some geography and budget limits, breed likes and end use aspirations???

If you are tied into a $500 - $1500. dollar budget and live in a horse barren are thats 1/2 the battle.

You haven't shared with us what you have actually looked at or tried even in a generalized form.

We all share your pain in looking for that "special" feel when looking for a partner.
buying a horse is in many ways like getting married and you do not want to make a costly financial or emotional mistake.

AKB
Jul. 3, 2010, 01:10 PM
It can take a long time to find the perfect horse. My daughter looked for a year before she found the perfect horse. Now, 7 years later, she wants a young horse to bring along so she will have a second horse when perfect horse number 1 needs to retire. I think she has found a perfect horse on the very first try. We will know more in a few weeks after she rides him for a third time and vets him.

Make a list of everything that you want. For example, her list for the current prospect was:
gelding
age 2-5
good feet
calm temperament
playful and social with people
15.3-16.1h
part Irish Draught
basic flat work-at least walk trot under saddle
ability to event through Novice-Training
good conformation
price
within 1 hr of home so she could ride him several times before purchase

Post your list so we can all give you some idea of whether or not you are being realistic. For example, if you want a sound 8 year old prelim packer and you have $1,000, you need to revise your criteria or increase your budget.

magicteetango
Jul. 3, 2010, 01:52 PM
I agree with the others about making a list and... BE.OBJECTIVE. Even if you have to think like you're buying a horse for someone else, I would try to find a horse that meets what you "need" to get where you're going. It's okay if that's not your soul mate, you could always trade up later.

asterix
Jul. 3, 2010, 03:49 PM
I really like rertread's advice, although there are lots of good posts here.
You DO need to be realistic about what your budget will buy you and what you can ride. But if you are finding and sitting on horses in your budget that basically meet your criteria, but you never get off and think "yes!", then keep looking.

All three of the ones I have bought I was in love with by te end of the first ride. One was early in the search, one 30 horses in, and one I pretty much knew when I saw his picture.

horseshoe56
Jul. 3, 2010, 07:53 PM
OP recently posted asking opinions on a Novice horse for sale for $25,000 from a BNT so it does not appear that budget is an issue.

OP - keep in mind that dream horses are usually made, not bought. Find a horse that you would be happy to see everyday at the barn. Make sure that horse is safe and mentally and physically capable of doing the job you desire. The rest will come with time.


Jammie

Xctrygirl
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:11 PM
Let me say first, all of the other posts on this thread are very applicable and valuable. This is a GREAT thread to print off and save.

My thoughts to this topic are this:

I think within the answers to the OP’s questions we have a few different types of buyers.

I believe we have a separation of the buyers who know where they are in their career and are buying a horse for what it will be.

Additionally I think we have a faction of buyers who need the “Been there, done that” horses to help educate them to the aforementioned level.

And the third category is the riders who fall into the crevice between the first two. The riders that have learned what they needed to from a made partner and now need a horse with some ‘issues’ to learn the arts of working through various challenges before taking on the full challenge of a green horse.

With all three of these distinctions knowing what you want and what’s most important to you going into the search is paramount. Also knowing what you don’t want, won’t accept and where your financial boundaries take you are also key pieces to the process.

I have been through all three of these groups as my career progressed and the horses that I ended up were a mix of Karma, luck and bending my desires. Here’s the best examples:

Needing the made horse:

I bought a green 5 yr old OTTB who was rock solid and jumped anything, was obedient and a lovely horse around the barn. In point of fact we backed out of a deal to buy a $25k chestnut hunter mare in order to buy Paddy. My instructor saw him late one day and she stopped the other deal. Said I had to go ride him. And it was over once I rode him. He became made at age 6. Totally surprising and a great horse that taught me tons and we won our first event together 3 weeks after I bought him.

Needing the good but some challenges horse: (This cracks me up still)

The list going in:
16 + hands
8-11 years
Bay, brown, grey or black
Gelding
1-2 seasons at Prelim
Flashy dressage mover
Under $25k
Ability to go higher


What I bought: ( :-D)
15.1/2” hand
5 years old
Chestnut
Mare
3 events at prelim. 7 lifetime (all levels)
Limited mover for dressage
Was under $25k
Ability to go higher was there for her…. Not as much in my head.

Genie solidified the foundation of the rider that I am today.

And the buying one for what he will be:

This is where Lad gets his 2 mins of fame. I met Lad in August ’04. He was for sale and a friend owned him and asked me to take some pics of him and tell other “equine sport” folks about him. I took the pics and never told a soul. I owned another horse and he was limited in what he could do. In October I got the shot and I took it. I called my friend up and said I wanted him. He agreed but asked if I could let him run one more race as he’d put a lot into prepping for it. I said sure. I went to the track that night and watched as Lad finished 6th out of 10 and wasn’t claimed. (a semi threat as he had finished 2nd twice at the level)

An hour later I met Lad for the second time, as his agreed owner. I never rode him. I did vet him. And I never saw him do more than warm up for the race and run. I took him home the day after the race. He got the full 4 days after the race off (normal for race horses) and on the 5th day I lunged him and literally started crying. He floated like a champion. I had paid $1,000 for a dream horse. And it was a lot of fate, karma, timing and co-incidence. And to this day I still have him and for once in my life can’t imagine parting with him. Many others I could understand outgrowing a horse. Lad….no.

All three of these types relegate the potential buyers to a different pool of horses. Try to be willing to stay in your pool, but flexible enough to glance to what else is out there and might work also. Horses are horses and with proper training and guidance many folks can succeed with horses where others may fail trying to go it alone.

I hope these tales remind you to take the instincts that come up and follow your heart when you like a horse.

~Emily

foxhavenfarm
Jul. 4, 2010, 07:58 AM
OP - keep in mind that dream horses are usually made, not bought. Find a horse that you would be happy to see everyday at the barn. Make sure that horse is safe and mentally and physically capable of doing the job you desire. The rest will come with time.

Jammie

Ditto that. Have the connection first, the experience can come later.

My dream horse was purchased straight off the track from pictures only and to top it off, he was a stallion. Got him home, started riding him and it just clicked. He is still a stallion and one of the most naturally talented horses I have ever ridden. The dressage took a while to come together, but he improved with every ride, and his jump is just amazing.

scubed
Jul. 4, 2010, 10:34 AM
If you're looking for an event prospect -- here's my advice -- don't look anywhere you might find event prospects!

My current guy was bred to be and trained until I got him to be a driving horse. So cantering is a bit of a work in process, unlike ottbs, but I have said, at my age he is probably my last untrained young 'un and he is a the right age (5), the right size (15.3), a great mover, athletic and has a great brain and nice personality. Bonus - my favorite dark bay.

Kairoshorses
Jul. 4, 2010, 12:31 PM
I feel for you. I looked for a year. Was going to give up, but promised I'd look at one last horse. We spent three days with him, riding at different times of day/different places. I really was fed up and didn't WANT to like him.

He's the horse of a lifetime. I adore him. He might not be perfect, but he's perfect for ME.

Have someone who knows you come with you--because if you are fed up, you might be underwhelmed at first (though by day 3, I was WHELMED). And spend some time with the horse. If your personalities don't mesh, you won't be happy.

My perfect horse was on equine.com, I think....but he was also listed in local area eventing "for sale" pages.

We've been together a year in mid-June, and I love him more every day. He's amazing. So it CAN happen. But it took a looooong time for me. I think it's good to hear "success" stories from time to time--it CAN happen! Best of luck to you!

pony grandma
Jul. 4, 2010, 12:54 PM
Xctrygirl and the rest of you -- THANKS so much for writing with paragraphs!! It makes it easier and so much more fun to read this thread. Plus it emphasizes your points and puts things more succinctly. Great organized writing styles - sharp minded people. Well worth reading their opinions I should say also.

I must add here -- darn I LEARNED SO MUCH from the horses that I shouldn't have bought! :lol:

Beam Me Up
Jul. 4, 2010, 02:34 PM
Without knowing your situation, I think you *can* be too picky for your budget, but at the same time, there are things you really can't compromise on (safety, soundness), and more "special" types of horses will take longer to find.

For example, if you want a retiring OTTB, most people probably find that in a single trip to the track. If you need a horse to take you to NAYRC this year. the pool of sale horses with that experience will be a lot smaller.

Agree with other posters that you need to list your wants and needs, assess whether they are reasonable for your budget, (and unfortunately, when on a budget, sometimes even your NEEDS have to be adjustable). Time constraints also make shopping a lot more challenging (if you want to do something before you graduate high school/age out of YR etc.) Also, consider why you are turning down each horse--does it relate to a want/need, or is it more of a just a gut thing (which is ok too).

Horse shopping has gotten a bit easier for me as time has gone on, in part because I wanted/needed something easier to find (when time constraints were lifted, I no longer needed something with as much experience) and because I really came to understand what type of horse I got along with (less a question of level of riding but more about style, and the type of horse personalities i got along with), and could better judge from a video or chat with the owner if we would be a match.

As for the green horse suggestions, I'm kind of surprised that so many people on this thread are pushing the "make your own" when we have so many other threads about people who have no business on green horses, what are they thinking, etc. However, for those with more time and money, it is probably the only solution, regardless of riding ability (I put myself in this category).

Equine Adhesive
Jul. 4, 2010, 05:21 PM
As one of the people on this thread who bought a young OTTB at the track- I'm a professional and I also ride racehorses, so making my own is sort of my thing. ;) If I had more time and more money, I would still buy green. :-)

horseshoe56
Jul. 4, 2010, 05:21 PM
I certainly did not mean to imply that a greenie is the way to go but I can see why it would sound that way!!!

For me, the idea of a dream horse is one that you come to connect with over time, after you have had a chance to make memories, good and bad, together. Depending on your experience that may be a made packer or it may be a OTTB. Sure, there are cases of finding "the one" when trying a horse, but true connection and "love at first sight" are not often the same thing.

I believe riders should be completely honest and realistic (or have a trainer that is not afraid to be completely truthful) in regards to their ability. That realism should be carried over to searching for the right mount.

Too many well-intentioned buyers go in with the idea that they will find a horse that is a 10 mover, phenomenal jumper, and incredibly athletic event horse. This horse will also be well-mannered, very polite, vice and injury free, and perfectly ridable by an ammy. The reality is that many of those qualities are somewhat mutually exclusive. Certainly, there are exceptions, but if you go into a horse search with those ideas, you are bound to be disappointed.

Sound, sane, safe. With those qualities, you can create your very own dream horse! Rarely are my most talented horses my favorites...

Jammie

Bogie
Jul. 4, 2010, 07:02 PM
As for the green horse suggestions, I'm kind of surprised that so many people on this thread are pushing the "make your own" when we have so many other threads about people who have no business on green horses, what are they thinking, etc. However, for those with more time and money, it is probably the only solution, regardless of riding ability (I put myself in this category).

This is a conundrum. I prefer to buy green because I don't like fixing the training errors that my so called "made" horses came with. I have always found it more difficult to fix bad training than to train them the way I want them to be the first time. Maybe I haven't done a perfect job but I've always ended up with horses that I enjoy and that seem to like their jobs.

I think that if you want to try training a green horse the key is having the support system to let you achieve your goals. The first time I bought an OTTB I had a trainer who was masterful at restarting race horses. I have used her methods with all my subsequent horses. I also judiciously used some pro rides to help me get through some training issues that I didn't feel capable of solving.

Now, I've never been in a particular hurry either. I can certainly understand people who have goals that are more time sensitive that don't want to start from scratch but I enjoy the journey as much as the destination.

bornfreenowexpensive
Jul. 4, 2010, 08:33 PM
I also think that people need to be realistic about their goals...and their riding.

Your dream horse may not be a single horse. It may be that your ultimate goal is Prelim...or Advanced....but if you are inexperienced or never ridden above novice. Your next horse may not be the horse to take you to your long term goals.

How often do we see those people who want a novice packer who can go Prelim? Honestly...those horses are RARE. What they should be thinking is that they need that solid novice/training level horse who will teach them...give them the skills so that they can ride their next horse who may take them beyond to Prelim or further. Perhaps winning shouldn't be as important as a solid xc horse who will give them confidence.....as others have said...set out your lists and be realistic.

I personally never seem to have any trouble finding horses....but honestly...I love most horses that I sit on.....so perhaps I don't have as much of a hang up of finding the one:lol:

misita
Jul. 5, 2010, 12:14 AM
It so depends on your criteria.

Let's start with what EVERYONE (almost) wants: Yes, finding a 100% sound, big, fancy, young, WB/TB, gelding, well-trained Prelim-or-up prospect, even better with experience, suitable for an amateur, on a budget, is hard.

Every aspect that you can "give" on makes it easier. What kind of sticking points are you running into?

Jennifer


This sums it up perfectly! The bottom line is, a horse who fit this criteria, will not be budget priced. That's the bottom line!

Beam Me Up
Jul. 5, 2010, 07:48 AM
And just to clarify, I didn't mean to imply that the OP *wasn't* capable of bringing along a greenie. I don't know her or her riding.

Just that we have a lot of "buy this greenie" threads mixed in with our "why are so many people overmounted" threads.

WishIWereRiding
Jul. 5, 2010, 09:51 AM
Sorry to be negative, but yes, it is really hard! And you would think in your price range you would be able to find something, right? Well, I've found whenever you look deeper you always find something you don't want, like, horse is too old, or has had an injury, or is crazy/hot/bucks/rears, etc, herd bound, cribs, whatever. There's always something. I don't know how anyone find anything today. I do think it's all through word of mouth and the best horses get sold that way. And even when you do put out feelers, it's still impossible to find something. I don't know what to tell you other than good luck! I know how hard it is.

netg
Jul. 5, 2010, 10:08 AM
[edit]

Did you say where you are? Would you consider shipping from somewhere not as close/travelling to look? (I don't remember from the start of this thread if you already discussed that or not.)

An example in your price range: My horse wasn't really marketed beyond fliers at events, because the seller wasn't motivated and didn't really want to see him leave (we now ride with the same trainer so she gets to see him every day and is happy). He was listed at 15K, he's 16.3, turned 8 this year. The one time he was lame in his 5 years off the track was when he got a stone bruise. He evented Training last year, and his only non-dressage penalties were from a water jump at Galway my trainer chose to let him stop and look at after seeing a series of ugly refusals by other horses since it was early on in his work with her, and a show where he apparently got a stone bruise on his way into the stadium jumping - warmed up fine, got in and hit three poles, so my trainer immediately got off and went straight to the show shoer knowing something was wrong.
He was pretty solid, but lacked the "initiative" to go much higher. I refer to him as a mama's boy, who wants to be told where to put each hoof, and he easily cleared all the training jumps but left questions as to whether he should ever go higher if he didn't want to set himself up in cross country. He had some training flaws my trainer was working on in her part time work on him, and from what I hear I likely wouldn't have been interested in him before her work with him.

He is a horse who was more suited to dressage than eventing beyond training level, but didn't yet know how to use his body moving. He was a low-60's type scorer without knowing how to use his body yet at dressage shows, but has improved very rapidly with consistent work and focus on dressage.

So he was in your price range, fit your requirements (unless in personality you mean tougher than he is!), but had a major flaw in his lack of initiative toward cross country. He was not and is not a bucker, a bolter, or very naughty at all. He is the most hilarious character I've ever met in a horse, and a joy to be around. I've never been around a horse who tries as hard as he does, and it's possible he could have learned to have initiative, but if you wanted to jump higher he probably wouldn't have been a good choice to buy thinking he'd get there. He *enjoyed* the jumping, and it's easy for him - just not a horse you'd want to aim toward prelim or more.

So a short summary - there are horses who fit within your requirements, but I'd expect some flaw in them when it comes to going higher if you find them. You probably need to think long and hard about what you will and won't accept among those flaws.

bornfreenowexpensive
Jul. 5, 2010, 11:08 AM
[edit]


In my area....you would be VERY VERY hard pressed to find what you are looking for in your price range...unless you will take an older horse who will need a bit of maintenance. If they are a good mover, good jumper, easy to ride, have training level experience, above 16.1 hands, good conformation and have a nice personality....you are looking 25-35 range...at least. More if they have the ability to go beyond training level. Only ones I can think of will be those that have a bit of age on them (over 10 and still a bit green or not green and over 13)

Most horses with that description with a bit of novice experience that are going to go beyond novice will be priced at 25K+...unless they are over the age of 12....although you might find a few that don't have much experience who are priced for a quicker sale.

You might find something in your price range if you are lucky. Or if you give up on something (i.e....less experience, not as easy to ride, not as nice of a mover...etc). But a good mover/jumper that is easy to ride is easily marketable as both and event horse or dressage horse or local all around horse....and therefore those horses are easy to sell...and sell for more than 20K once they have any experience.....and often will not be put on the market until they have a bit of experience because people know how easy they will be to sell with just a few show miles.

Good luck...you can find what you are looking for...but it will be harder and you will need to be a bit lucky.

asterix
Jul. 5, 2010, 02:44 PM
agree with bornfree, for this area (we are both in midatlantic). It is my impression that it would be much easier in some other parts of the country, but that's just from reading these boards...

I think that if you really don't want to compromise on any of the things you listed, and your budget is firm, and you are in a part of the country where prices are higher (like here, probably california, florida, maybe the northeast, etc)....

you might want to consider leasing a horse with the goal of getting enough experience yourself that you would be happy looking for a horse that did not have Training miles. That jacks the price up, unfortunately.

I leased a horse until I thought I could ride what I wanted, a Training horse that could go prelim. I really stretched my budget (and let's just say that "easy to sit" was neither on my list nor a characteristic my eventual horse had...his size was also a mark against him, but because he was huge, not too small...).

My most recent horse was much more affordable, but by the time I went shopping for him I was a number of years more experienced as an eventer, and I was perfectly happy to buy a green horse and bring him along. We didn't zoom up the levels at 90 miles an hour, as he is my first greenie, but he is now a solid Training horse who is aimed at the T3d this fall and (I have been told) will go prelim in due time...

but THAT horse was very much not the horse I would have wanted a few years ago.

Leasing for a season or two might give you valuable experience and open you up to looking at horses without Training experience...

ThirdCharm
Jul. 5, 2010, 02:47 PM
I have to agree, in this area, which isn't even that "eventery" but close enough to SP and Aiken.... if I were selling or looking for an experienced Training horse that is easy to sit, nice mover, good conformation, pleasant tempered, and big? Over $25K easily unless you are willing to overlook age or soundness issues. You've just described the horse that every amateur wants!


Now,for a 16.2h 8yo lapdog-type sweetie with extensive xc experience (schooling xc and foxhunting in Tryon) but no real training (his flatwork was appalling and his musculature nonexistent), sort of a homely rawboned looking fellow that you would absolutely overlook in a field, one of my students just paid $7K. He is ready to run Training once his physical development for flatwork catches up with his willingness to perform! So there was a "give" but more importantly when we looked at him I was able to say to my client "Okay, he looks atrocious now, but he's trying and he WILL be able to do it" as he was trotting around with his ears up his rider's nose...... so experienced help, helps.....

Jennifer

Bogie
Jul. 5, 2010, 05:23 PM
I think that in the NE that may also be a tall order. However, I've seen some fox hunters advertised on the foxhunter online list that are well within your price range and have excellent xc experience. Undoubtedly their flat work will Need work and they might not be the best movers but I would always choose jumping ability and willingness to jump xc over movement. There are many ways to improve flatwork; it's much harder to teach bravery.

Foxtrot's
Jul. 5, 2010, 05:30 PM
Buy a three year old and bring it on yourself - it is amazing how they can zoom up the ranks if you know what you are doing. It is fun bringing on your own...and the time goes fast.

columbus
Jul. 5, 2010, 06:10 PM
The saying "love the one your with" comes to mind.

We each have the image of our dream horse...hopefully...there is not a perfect horse image that the dream horse has to fit. There are no perfect horses.

There are many horses out there who would be fun to train. Many of those horses would be good candidates to resell if they failed at keeping you interested for a long time. I think everyone should be in the position of having to sell a horse...not get rid of a horse, but to sell a horse and get more for it than you bought it for...find an unpolished gem, select it from many and improve it...then market it and sell it. I believe it will make riders appreciate the lot of sellers and of the horses we try...and the horses we already have.

We have had this discussion before. I think that buyers think that a upper level horse is the horse of a BNR dream. Very, very often it is the horses they couldn't sell. It is the horse that is too quick and intolerant, too silly, too bull-headed, or it has the chip in the hock that buyers won't look past(their perfect horse image doesn't have any flaws). It is a small chestnut mare with an osselet. The big silly looking 4 yo gelding that still needs 2 years to grow and strengthen. What the BNR or BNT did was make the horse they had the best horse it could be. Sometimes they traded one unsaleable horse that didn't suit them for the horse of another rider who had a horse they couldn't make work.

In the Twin Cities area we have a Yahoo Group called the TCCT Yahoo Group(Twin Cities Combined Training). It started as a relay point for the Central States Dressage and Eventing Association to distribute information amongst each other. Many others have joined and now it is a way for the region to let people know that horses are available for sale and lease. There is probably a similar Yahoo type group in your area and if there isn't you all should start one as it is a great way to shuttle important information around your region. In a sense it is like a pet rescue with foster homes. The smaller regional aspect means you know more about the horses that come available. PatO

Kyzteke
Jul. 5, 2010, 06:20 PM
I dont understand this forum stuff, and I am trying to navigate on a dial up computer to top it off! I read stories about this person trying so hard to find the right horse, and I feel like I have one to share for free...can someone out there tell me how I let eventers/dressage riders know about my 6yr. old Friesian cross mare, who is free to use to the right, motivated rider? (I don't want her to get messed up with bad training or poor handling!) Help! Rebecca in NC:confused:

Sorry to hijack -- but I used COTH "Free" forum to advertise my Hanoverian mare who I was willing to lease long-term to a riding home. As long as you aren't asking for $$ it's ok. Then I also cross-posted on the Dressage Forum.

I also used Google to locate local dressage clubs and sent emails to them.

The end result was I found a great temporary home for my mare where she is getting good care, loved on and MUCH better training than I could give her in a home about 6 hrs away.

But I think the OP was asking about BUYING, not leasing....

jn4jenny
Jul. 5, 2010, 07:38 PM
You might considering picking up a Novice-level horse for $12-$15K, pay $3K-$5K in training and entry fees with a trusted trainer to bring it up to Training, and voila--you're within your budget, you've got a lovely Training Level horse in a matter of months, and you've still been able to ride the beast because it's not minty green. I know a few folks who have gone that route and were very happy with it.

eventr4life
Jul. 5, 2010, 08:42 PM
Im absolutely willing to get a horse that has Novice experience - mainly its so that i know the horse loves eventing and its not like getting an OTTB and you dont know whether it will love it or not.

All the posts about getting an experienced person to help you, well that i have! Sense January i was planning to go to a BNT to be a working student(this was when i had a horse) And now she is helping me find horses - slowly but surely!

I have this one question...
I rode this 4yr. old TB just to "sit on it" and LOVED HIM!!! so so so so fun!!! And had only been under saddle sense MARCH?! But was correctly put on the bit/jump was really fun. But he is super green - and young. So, i was worried whether it would be a smart match. Im not that amazing of a rider, im at about Training level(C2 pcer), so it worried me. Lots of people said "you need something thats experienced" But i loved him...

Just to get it out there: My goals and aspirations are to go Advanced(4****).

Bogie
Jul. 5, 2010, 09:23 PM
Loving the horse is what it's all about because then it's fun. There are plenty of young/green horses that are relatively easy to ride, just as there are plenty of more experienced horses that are not easy rides at all.

If you're a good ride and have a good trainer to help you, it can work.

Also, the horse that you buy today is probably not going to be the horse that you take to a ****.

eventr4life
Jul. 5, 2010, 09:32 PM
I guess the risk of buying a 4yr old makes my stomach turn, considering i can't just go and buy another horse if it turns out to not like eventing.

I completely understand that no horse i will buy right now will turn out to be a 4**** horse, the horse im looking for i want to go Prelim, MAYBE intermediate...

ThirdCharm
Jul. 5, 2010, 11:18 PM
What does your BNT say about your difficulties finding a horse that meets your requirements?

Any horse you buy is a risk. The honest-to-god experienced 4* horse might never complete another training and no vet can figure out what is wrong with it. You could buy a horse that will jump anything and get eliminated because whoops no one mentioned it will kill you before you get it in a start box. The 4yo could hate eventing. It could be the next Foreman. It could be the next Rox Dene and then you can buy as many dang event horses as you want!

Jennifer

Moderator 1
Jul. 6, 2010, 08:22 AM
A reminder that to comply with our no-advertising policies, please keep the specifics about horses wanted or available out of the thread (we've removed some comments). We now offer a "Horses Wanted" classified section where for $10 the original poster can post her full wish list and folks can contact her privately with suggestions.

Thanks!
Mod 1

bornfreenowexpensive
Jul. 6, 2010, 09:53 AM
I guess the risk of buying a 4yr old makes my stomach turn, considering i can't just go and buy another horse if it turns out to not like eventing.
.



What...no. You learn about training this 4 year old. And if he turns out not to like eventing...you switch gears, add some polish in the direction he does want to head and sell him. Then you buy your next horse. Honestly, it is more unusual for them NOT to want to be an event horse IME....but it isn't that hard to sell a nice horse.

You have the learn to not think that this next horse has to help you achieve all your goals....will be your next UL event horse. You have to think...do I like riding this horse....do I think I can learn something with this horse and enjoy myself in the process? At this point in your riding career...to me these are the important factors. If you already have the skills of bringing along a young horse....or really really want to just compete....then no, pass on a green 4 year old.

The basics you put on them now will not make them less marketable as a show horse or dressage horse if that is the direction they ended up being better suited.

Honestly...if you liked the 4 year old...and you will be in a solid program with good help...you would not be crazy to head in that direction. No...it isn't ideal if eventing and competing are your goals. But it will further your horse education...and in the long run...you will gain skills that will help you achieve your long term eventing goals.

eventr4life
Jul. 6, 2010, 07:24 PM
The BNT im working for hasn't really said anything about my problems finding a horse - i guess we are just simply 'pushing forward' into finding my next horse.
Im going to look at one tomorrow, so everyone cross your fingers!!

<3myTBlivesINmySOUL<3
Jul. 6, 2010, 08:00 PM
A great partnership between horse and rider shouldnt be underestimated!!! I've ridden/owned quite a few that people never thought would take me anywhere close to my riding goals ... some hard rides, some less than perfect confo, etc ... but what we had was trust and a strong relationship ... and a lot of heart. You find a horse you enjoy and clique with, make sure his natural gaits are balanced/even, and have him vetted for your intended purpose.You can fill in all the other blanks such as training/experience ... just like with men, you can shop around and build up an idea of perfection in your head but when you find "the one" you just know.

Bogie
Jul. 6, 2010, 08:09 PM
If you buy one that doesn't like to event you either start doing what it likes or sell it and move on. I've done both, depending on how much I liked the horse.

What level do you compete at now? IMHO, there's a big difference between prelim and intermediate. If you are looking for a horse that will safely teach you how to go prelim, it may not be the one with the scope for intermediate.


I guess the risk of buying a 4yr old makes my stomach turn, considering i can't just go and buy another horse if it turns out to not like eventing.

I completely understand that no horse i will buy right now will turn out to be a 4**** horse, the horse im looking for i want to go Prelim, MAYBE intermediate...

scubed
Jul. 7, 2010, 08:52 AM
I ran into that. Bought last year a four year old I really liked. He is fabulous, but he wants to do hunters and I want to event, so he is for sale and I have a new horse. But, I had great fun working with him and he will be great fun for someone who wants to do the hunters. Out of about 30 horses, this is only the 3rd I've had that didn't want to event (and 1 didn't want to to do anything and was retired as a trail horse/pasture ornament)