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Lady Counselor
Jul. 2, 2010, 11:06 AM
I am in the process of upgrading old fencelines to new posts and panels. I wanted to pick the collective brains here for input about what is being used these days, just so I'm not missing anything that would be new to me.

I originally had three board wooden fence. Very pretty, but high maintenance and now entire sections of fenceline need replacing at once because the posts are breaking off underground. (my fault, I used cheaper pressure treated landscape ties for posts)

I also lined the inside of these older wooden paddocks a couple years ago with Red Diamond no-climb fencing to protect the wood a bit more and prolong it. I do like that. It's a bit pricey and tough to fix, and I am getting sharp ends in places where it's gotten broken.

One paddock I did with better grade 4x4 and no climb fencing, topped with a single wooden rail. I like this one, but again, it's not the easiest thing to fix and the lower part of the no-climb has more flex than I would like.

I now find myself changing old fencelines over to pressure treated wooden posts and round pen panels affixed between them. So far so good, although I worry about an accident occuring that would split the metal. On the pro's side, they are easy to install and maintain, (esp. when they come pre-painted) and the horses aren't chewing or fussing with them. On the con's side is the cost and the potential for injury if one is compromised.

I have not used any of the Ramm fencing, or similar. I really know very little about it. I have a couple more paddocks to build and would like to investigate fencing options.

What do you use?
Pro's?
Cons?
If you could use any fencing at all, what would you choose?
And what would you avoid like the plaque?
TIA.

eponacelt
Jul. 2, 2010, 11:31 AM
We have three board for most of our fencing. When we bought the place earlier this year, much of it was in poor repair, and we spent money and lots of our own time replacing a whole lot of it. I like three board for perimeter fencing because it is solid and very, very visible.

However, my internal fences that we're building to create a rotational grazing system and to fence off the wetland and stream area on the property, are all Horseguard. I loff Horseguard. More importantly, my husband, who is stuck doing a lot of the fence building LOFFS Horseguard.

It was VERY easy to install on T-posts, and with the nice covers they sell, it looks attractive too. The horses respect it, and the one time I had a horse run into it, all I had to do was spend 5 minutes re-tensioning the fence, and it was done. We even were able to run a strand on top of the three board where we share a pasture fence with the neighbors horses. No communing over the fence!

Also, the Horseguard customer service is great, and their product is so easy to install. Everything is ingeniously made.

I will say that I don't think I'd use it for all the perimeter fencing though. That's mostly because I like hard, solid, VERY visible fencing that is TOUGH for horses to get through, and in my mind, nothing is better for that than 3 or 4 board fence.

Dalemma
Jul. 2, 2010, 11:45 AM
Exterior fencing is Electorbraid with metal corner posts and their fiberglass posts in between........In the grass pastures I have treated wood posts with tape.....in the paddocks I have the tape but have used metals posts......they chew if they are confined.......so the metal elements chewed posts.

Picture of the paddocks

http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s77/DalEmma2002/Paddocks.jpg

Dalemma

ReSomething
Jul. 2, 2010, 11:50 AM
Avoid? Barbed wire, high tensile wire (by that I mean wire that cuts rather than snaps, too strong of wire, too tight of wire).

Standard for the TB farms is four board or diamond wire with a top board. Tried and true, generally accepted as safe for all equines.

They can kill themselves on anything though, or break a leg, so it is sort of a crapshoot on all fencing as to which one is the safest.

For our own place we wanted wire with a sight board, but we are still waiting to get the holes drilled through our rock (DH is a cheap fella) so since we had planned to subdivide internally we went with Electrobraid, which suited our terrain well, was visible, could be hung from t posts or trees or any surface really, and is more user-friendly than plain electric wire so disconnectable single strands are easy to put in and use. Ramm and centaur were both nice but didn't offer the flexibility of the Electrobraid, which is basically a nylon rope.

Stock panels we use for pens. They are a nice option but I can't off the top of my head compare them price wise, I guess I need to figure the precise cost per foot of my fences (DON"T want to do that, really I don't). The ones we have have taken some abuse by the pony, who has leaned on the gate panel and the divider panel, bent up a couple of pipes etc. I see this as a problem because they aren't really straightenable and they look bad, I want to place to look reasonably nice, well kept etc.

ETA We also have a wind issue here, and the EB is a rope and not affected by wind, the off label tape that was here when we moved in flapped and wiggled something awful, and the neighbors' cows walked right through it.

Eventaholic
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:05 PM
Where is your fencing on the property, and what else is around it?

I use 3 strands of electrobraid- no cross fencing/perimeter, just two seperate fields. I live in a fairly rural area and both pastures are surrounded 90%+ by 10' wild rose hedges, and then a good several hundred acres of forest on the outside of that... so I feel VERY confident that the horses aren't going ANYWHERE.

If I lived in a less rural area or near roads that people actually drove one and didn't have my wonderful rose hedges I would probably put up no-climb or something similar. For me it's just as much fencing for the horses so they don't hurt themselves on the fencing, as it is taking the landscape/setup into mind.

Janet
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:08 PM
I have found three board fencing (using the right materials, professionally installed) to be very low maintenance.

fordtraktor
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:16 PM
I am upgrading some of my fencelines to electrified coated wire (5 strands). We have a little of everything on the family farm, and like this the best. The key is ELECTRIC. Horses don't mess with the fences if there's a strand of electricified something there.

easyrider
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:19 PM
I love my Horseguard bipolar fencing with solar chargers. Very affordable, very easy to install and virtually no maintenance. I put in posts where I had to, and used their fiberglass stakes everywhere else. It looks elegant (even if not quite as elegant as board fence).

If I had endless amounts of money, I'd honestly put in board fence everywhere (with the Horseguard fence if I still had a cribber) but since I don't and I live where I live, I don't care to move rocks for the next fifteen years.

When I was looking at my fencing alternatives, I was intrigued by the Bayco Finish Line but didn't want to put in all those posts. I'd still be digging today.

poltroon
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:25 PM
I have not used any of the Ramm fencing, or similar. I really know very little about it. I have a couple more paddocks to build and would like to investigate fencing options.

I have the Ramm flex fence as a top rail for my no-climb fence, and I quite like it. The posts need to be very solid, but if they are, the fence has been zero maintenance.

I think having tall fences helps too. That was advice that came here from COTH, to do 5' fences, and I think that was right on the money.

The no-climb is a PITA to install and I've had some issues with it, mostly because we did not stretch it tightly enough (I was chicken we'd break it). However, we'll do that again for our perimeter fence, to keep dogs in. (And, when we put in the first stretch, to keep the toddler out.) I'm not sure I will use it for ordinary cross-fencing in the future unless I need to keep the small critters out. But it is a great fence.

I'm using some Horseguard as well. I love it for easy installation, but in my area, where the grass grows very high very fast in spring, and then the ground is dry dry dry in summer and fall, any kind of electric fencing is actually very high maintenance.

easyrider
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:32 PM
Just wanted to mention that the Horsequard bipolar fencing works anywhere. Because it's not grounded, it stays hot regardless of your ground conditions -- even dry or frozen. Of course, the fence mowing is still an issue.

horsepoor
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:42 PM
I have Centaur HTP for my perimeter fencing and would do that again if I could afford to in any future fencing. But it was expensive, although next time I think we could save by installing ourselves -- we had it done, and that probably doubled the cost, but SO is not that handy and our lack of free time was a big factor in that decision.

My cross fencing is Horseguard tape. I like it a lot for that purpose - easy to install, I can move it as needed, and it does work fairly well. But I wouldn't use it for perimeter fencing.

We considered no climb or diamond mesh with a top board when we first looked at fencing here, but the downside for us was our terrain. We are on a slope and the ground goes up and down and it would be very difficult to make the wire mesh/board look good in such terrain.

I have some wood 3-board fencing at the front of our pasture (short stretches from barn to gates, before the big runs of Centaur start). I hate it. Horses chew on it unless I keep electric on it, I've had a horse get his leg in it (not pretty), and the boards are splitting in spots already and it is just 3 or 4 years old.

I despise electric rope fencing, having boarded at places that used it -- every single horse that I had at that barn for any period of time has scars from that stuff. But it was poorly installed (too long stretches between posts, too loose) and rarely maintained. I know some people here love it. But I won't use it.

We are putting in some new pasture (if our worker guy ever returns -- our rainy spring sent him into hiding and he hasn't emerged yet!) and what I'm looking at for those areas is just one Centaur HTP top rail (the 4 or 5 inch stuff like I have elsewhere) and then strands of the coated wire (White Lightning, although in our case it is brown) below that. Helps make it more affordable than the multi-rail Centaur that I have, and we can definitely install that ourselves. I think it will look good with the other Centaur and brown Horseguard tape that I have in use, and is safe and easy to maintain.

Dalemma
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:59 PM
[QUOTE=horsepoor;4954668]

I despise electric rope fencing, having boarded at places that used it -- every single horse that I had at that barn for any period of time has scars from that stuff. But it was poorly installed (too long stretches between posts, too loose) and rarely maintained. I know some people here love it. But I won't use it.

QUOTE]

There is rope fencing and then there is Electrobraid.....two different products.........we have some fencing companys up here that try to pass off electric rope as the same stuff as Electrobraid....but it differences are like night and day......strength being one of them and the fact that Electrobraid has to be tensioned the rope cannot be tensioned just tightened.......and when Electrobraid is installed properly and NOT used as crossing fencing unless you have a 12' alley between(per manufacturers instructions)....it is the safest fencing I have come across


Dalemmma

Dalemma
Jul. 2, 2010, 01:03 PM
Where is your fencing on the property, and what else is around it?

I use 3 strands of electrobraid- no cross fencing/perimeter, just two seperate fields. I live in a fairly rural area and both pastures are surrounded 90%+ by 10' wild rose hedges, and then a good several hundred acres of forest on the outside of that... so I feel VERY confident that the horses aren't going ANYWHERE.

If I lived in a less rural area or near roads that people actually drove one and didn't have my wonderful rose hedges I would probably put up no-climb or something similar. For me it's just as much fencing for the horses so they don't hurt themselves on the fencing, as it is taking the landscape/setup into mind.

I live on five acres in a subdivsion with people on all sides of me some bush some open grass fields. I have no concerns about my horses getting out with the Electrobraid.....it is far to hot...about 10,000 volts for them to even consider touching it.

Dalemma

poltroon
Jul. 2, 2010, 01:18 PM
Just wanted to mention that the Horsequard bipolar fencing works anywhere. Because it's not grounded, it stays hot regardless of your ground conditions -- even dry or frozen. Of course, the fence mowing is still an issue.

I am going to try the bipolar next time I buy some.

EiRide
Jul. 2, 2010, 06:38 PM
I've got four rail Horserail fencing, which is basically the same sort of thing as Ramm or Centaur. I've had it about three years now, love it to bits.

tabula rashah
Jul. 2, 2010, 07:01 PM
I have two or three (depending on which pasture) strands of electric tape with trees as the majority of my posts. I have an odd set up due to the fact that my property is all heavily wooded. It would be impossible for me to have any type of board fence, because I would be constantly fixing boards that limbs had fallen on. The tape is super easy to fix, visible, cheap and carries a whopper of a charge. I would not, however, use it for a fence along a road or if I had a horse that really challenged the fence.

KrazyTBMare
Jul. 2, 2010, 07:53 PM
Perimeter fence is a "3 board" that has wood board on top and bottom with X in the middle. Fence was here when we bought the place. We added no climb and a strand of Horseguard to the top that is hot.

Existing fence when we bought that place as well was the dividing fence that splits the property into Parcel A and B. This is a fence like you mentioned, no climb with wood on top. So far so good and no complaints. Touch up the top boards every now and then but thats it.

I put up my own cross fencing to make smaller pastures/paddock and it is Horseguard. We bought the pressure treated 4x4 round posts set 4' into the ground. All 3 strands of Horseguard are hot using a 25 mile Solar box.

LOVE my Horseguard. Other than tightening a strand here or there, its been up for 4 years thus far and I have not had ONE problem.

Tom King
Jul. 2, 2010, 08:07 PM
We have a number of different types. We have road frontage on several roads. Near the house we have treated Poplar split rail-much heavier than the typical treated pine split rail. It's been trouble free but I can't find it any more. I wouldn't want it out of sight for days though like a board fence that I trust.

On the road at the back of the farm we have 4 board, 5' high with a #9 aluminum hot wire 4" above the top, 4x4 posts and 2x6 boards. It's also been trouble free.

Between the dog yards and the pastures we have Non-Cimb all the way to the ground. No trouble with it either on treated posts.

We have LOTs of 1/2" tape fences dividing off inside parts, some of it 18 years old (it was put in as "temporary" fence, some on cedar posts and some was installed on landscape timbers) also. I'll never use landscape timbers for anything anymore, although we do have some 15 year old cavellettis I built with them and those are okay, I guess because they never touch the ground. All the landscape timbers in the fence have been replaced by now. This fence is a constant pain in the ass, but I just haven't come up with the time or inclination to bother to replace it other than the time it takes to keep it up. I'll never put up a temporary tape fence again though.

Newer pasture divider fences have been 4 1/2' high three board and those have been no trouble either.

paintjumper
Jul. 2, 2010, 08:25 PM
I had 2 horses get wrapped in that stuff and one almost cut his hind leg off, took me, my husband, and the vet all working together at the same time, more than 3 hours to sew him back up...we almost lost him . The other one was not as bad but still ended up with about 30 stitches. The mess won't break, no matter what!! When we got a video of it they had a car suspended in the air with one strand (at the time, I thought that was a good thing), add electricity to the mix and you have a disaster in the making. At the very least, if you already have it up.....don't make it electric!

BasqueMom
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:24 PM
We had a customer who bought a boarding facility and replaced but not all of the fencing with our products. A couple of years later she called for more of
Centaur product--her best show mare had gotten a leg caught in the Electrobraid and had degloved her leg to the bone and had to be put down.

We have some Centaur coated wire on T-Posts with the sleeves, some of the
same on the existing pipe posts and a line of Centaur with more waiting if DH
ever gets off his behind.

Due to the economy, this year most of our customers have been ordering coated wire products, electric and non-electric. It used to be like half and half between the rail and the coated wire. And more ordering a top rail with strands of coated wire underneath which is a nice compromise and looks good, too.

And yes, landscape timbers make terrible fence posts!

MistyBlue
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:36 PM
I have Ramm fencing.
I really really like it.
Not ridiculously expensive. Actually rather inexpensive for a non-temporary type fencing.
Little to no maintenance.
Safe as heck.
Strong as heck.

My set up is all pressure treated round posts. 6" line posts and 8" corner, end, gate and brace posts. Due to size of posts they're all set at 12' apart.
Fencing is top rail 4.25" 3 wire Flex Fence. (although I think now their Flex fence is 5" wide?)
In main paddock under the Flex is 4 rails set 12" apart 5/16 poly coated wire. (not hot)
In the grass paddock is 3 rails of the same poly coat wire.
Set on top of everything is one strand electrobraid.


I recently had it redone...but that's because my husband and I put it in ourselves 6 years ago and had never put up fencing before. We kinda mucked it up a lot and really stunk at augering holes, setting posts and tamping hem tight. After 5 years posts started leaning and they were never in a straight line to begin with.

However despite oour screwing it up royally, it held up beautifully all that time, even after the posts all looked drunk. :lol: My mare was a fence charger, she'd never try to jump but she'd charge through fences for fun. She hit that fence that we put up at a full gallop, slamming her chest into it expecting it to break. 1600+ lbs of cheesed off mare hit the rails, the rails bulged out slightly and then sprang back and flung her on her opinionated arse. Horse, fence and posts were all 100% fine. (well, horse was pissed)

Hubby hit it with the tractor countless times...fence, posts and tractor fine.

Enormous tree branch landed on it, boinged back off. No damage to fence.

So Ramm (or the similar Centaur) would be my suggestion.

Here's my fence:
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y172/MistyBlue5105/NewfenceandgardenMay2010001.jpg
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y172/MistyBlue5105/NewfenceandgardenMay2010003.jpg
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y172/MistyBlue5105/NewfenceandgardenMay2010002.jpg
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y172/MistyBlue5105/PromandpaddockMay222010002.jpg

deltawave
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:43 PM
Crappily installed or maintained fencing that hurts a horse is not the fault of the material, it's the fault of the installer or the one who neglects the fence.

Another die-hard Electrobraid believer here. I have never had a horse so much as bend a whisker on it, because they will not go near the fence. I've had one colt bounce off it, unharmed, and every other youngster has learned the lesson (don't go near the fence) after precisely ONE zap to the nose.

It must be installed properly and tensioned occasionally. At this point (four years after installation) that is down to about once a year, a 45-60 minute job for the whole property.

paintjumper
Jul. 2, 2010, 10:16 PM
One guy, the one that got hurt the worst, laid down close to it to roll and got his back legs caught in it. It was shocking the $#%$$ out of him and it would not break, thus he ripped himself up terribly. I have the pictures to prove it, if you are a non-believer. The other one, probably did something similar but was just lucky enough for the fence not to wrap above the hock, like the other one. He was actually the first horse to get in it and I just thought it was a fluke, so I left the fence up. Needless to say, when # 2 got hurt so badly, about 1 month later...it all came down and went right into a burn pile. Big $ wasted and 2 hurt horses. If it hasn't hurt one of yours, you are just lucky because the potential it there.

Dalemma
Jul. 2, 2010, 10:24 PM
One guy, the one that got hurt the worst, laid down close to it to roll and got his back legs caught in it. It was shocking the $#%$$ out of him and it would not break, thus he ripped himself up terribly. I have the pictures to prove it, if you are a non-believer. The other one, probably did something similar but was just lucky enough for the fence not to wrap above the hock, like the other one. He was actually the first horse to get in it and I just thought it was a fluke, so I left the fence up. Needless to say, when # 2 got hurt so badly, about 1 month later...it all came down and went right into a burn pile. Big $ wasted and 2 hurt horses. If it hasn't hurt one of yours, you are just lucky because the potential it there.

Are you sure it was actually Electrobraid......if tensioned properly it should not be able to take a wrap on a horses leg?

Electrobraid is only available from the manufacturer who is located in Nova Scotia, Canada........there are lots of knock offs and lots of rope type products that are sold but not meant to be tensioned only tightened......those types can take a wrap on a horses leg quite easily.

Dalemma

paintjumper
Jul. 2, 2010, 10:59 PM
no knockoff, the real deal.

horsepoor
Jul. 2, 2010, 11:29 PM
MistyBlue- Your fencing looks great. I'm glad you posted those pictures as I was trying to describe to SO what I want to do on our new pastures and that is a good example (except ours will be brown).

Dalemma
Jul. 3, 2010, 01:03 AM
no knockoff, the real deal.

Then all I can say it was likely not tensioned tight enough as mine cannot physically take a wrap on any part of my horse.

Dalemma

ayrabz
Jul. 3, 2010, 05:32 AM
I have Ramm fencing as well...

http://s594.photobucket.com/albums/tt25/ayrabz/Farmette%20Completion%20Sep%2009/?albumview=slideshow

This is my mom's place, where we'll retire to....so, there was a lot to consider in fencing....as its 'road' frontage on a small property (i.e. 'front yard') it had to be attractive enough. This is the wider rail... And, since it will be required to be a little maintenance as possible, and to last (!) I opted for this route. Liked Centaur just as much, but had a better deal with a Ramm installer/fencer.

We chose the black vs. the white because of more ease of less 'cleaning' of mold over time, and as well as we felt it helped the small property appear less 'small/chopped up' vs. the white contrasts.

I added a (hot) coated wire (didn't like the electrobraid/rope) on the top rail, and added another one above the bottom rail (in between bottom and middle rail) because of the strong possibility we would be containing a mini or mini donk etc, as a companion at some point.

For what we wanted to achieve, I am very pleased with the decision. Best of luck!

Tom King
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:10 AM
I was trying to visualize how a leg can get wrapped by a tensioned rope. If the horse puts a rear leg under the rope, picks it up and the hoof goes over the top, and then down and back up under again, it would have enough strength and mechanical advantage to take a wrap.

I tried to find specs on the stretch properties of Electorbraid but was not able to.

I can't think of any kind of rope that has low stretch properties stong enough to tension enough to overcome a horse's strength short of stuff that costs a buck and a half a foot. This would be rope (called line on sailboats) like Stablebraid and stronger. Also it would take a multi-purchase pulley system to tension it to it's limits enough.

http://wesspur.com/rope/stable-braid-five-eighths-rope.html
There are plenty of lines available stronger than this stuff but all cost even more. No one is going to use line that costs this much to make a fence out of and even if they did, I wouldn't use it for a fence.

No rope that you can put over any kind of span on fenceposts will be strong enough to prevent a horse from taking a wrap.

paintjumper
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:21 AM
you could snap or hit it and it would "ping". I can take some pictures if you don't believe me, I don't have the subsrcitpion to COTH to be able to post pictures here but I can email someone and they can post them the first of next week, our daughter has the camera in WV until Monday. Those that have it may never have problems but I'm just warning those that are thinking about it should be aware of the dangers, the stuff can be very dangerous.

Dalemma
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:53 AM
Sorry pics won't show how tight your fence was.........the only other reasons for horses too get close to an electric fence is that the zap is not strong enough.

I use electrobraid for exterior fencing only in both in my pastures and paddocks.........I had used it for interior fencing but took it down due to an accident.......when I phoned and told EB about it they told me they had implemented new recommendations that it not be used for interior separation unless you had 12' alley ways.

I had two horses fighting over the fence line while in their paddocks and in the middle of the night one reared up to close and came down on top of the top strand..........with some pulling she managed to get her foot off......the rope did not take a wrap on her leg..........but did leave a rope burn on the underside on her pastern that healed...........I did remove it and put up wide electric tape.....which the horses have broken many times with fights over the fenceline but nobody has hurt themselves on it either.

I am sorry that you had such a bad experience with Electrobraid........I have had nothing but positive experiences with it in both confined paddocks and large grass pastures.

Dalemma

Dalemma
Jul. 3, 2010, 09:54 AM
I was trying to visualize how a leg can get wrapped by a tensioned rope. If the horse puts a rear leg under the rope, picks it up and the hoof goes over the top, and then down and back up under again, it would have enough strength and mechanical advantage to take a wrap.

I tried to find specs on the stretch properties of Electorbraid but was not able to.

I can't think of any kind of rope that has low stretch properties stong enough to tension enough to overcome a horse's strength short of stuff that costs a buck and a half a foot. This would be rope (called line on sailboats) like Stablebraid and stronger. Also it would take a multi-purchase pulley system to tension it to it's limits enough.

http://wesspur.com/rope/stable-braid-five-eighths-rope.html
There are plenty of lines available stronger than this stuff but all cost even more. No one is going to use line that costs this much to make a fence out of and even if they did, I wouldn't use it for a fence.

No rope that you can put over any kind of span on fenceposts will be strong enough to prevent a horse from taking a wrap.

I disagree.........if you have something stretched to it limits....how can it stretch anymore to take a wrap on something.??

I think it is about 2000lbs...Whoops thought you were asking about strength.

Electrobraid has very little stretch especially when tensioned properly......but don't know the actual percents


Dalemma

paintjumper
Jul. 3, 2010, 10:39 AM
There are no pictures of the fence......it is LONG gone, I was talking about pictures of the horse's back legs, the result of what the fence did to him. :( As far as the "hotness" of the fence...it showed a 5-6 (all the way to the top) on the little fence indicator thing whenever it was checked.
Can you imagine what would happen if a foal got hung in the fence considering what it did to my 3 year old? I have no doubt it will kill a foal because they would not have the strength to get out of it and the constant zapping of the electricty on a hung up baby would eventually kill it. No way I could leave that stuff up. I certainly wish you and yours good luck.

Dalemma
Jul. 3, 2010, 11:07 AM
If you were registering 5/6 .....than what you are actually saying is that your fence is 5000 to 6000 volts which is the miniumum they recommend for horses........I have 8000 to 10,000 volts running through mine.....so considerably more.

I actually think a foal would have faired better as it does not have the strength that an adult horse has.

I had one other incident with a 9 month old foal (that I had forgotten about) but the Electrobraid probably prevented her from getting serioiusly hurt........something spooked her in her paddock and she took off and when she got to the end of the fence line she tried to turn but slipped and when under the fence....half on one side half on the other side.......she kinda flopped around struggling to get up(it only lasted seconds).....the electrobraid gave her the flex she needed to be able to get up......I always wonder what would have happened if that had been solid wood.....her flailing body would have splintered or broken the wood rail and maybe got herself impaled.??? Or whacked her leg so hard on the wood it would have broken?? Who knows.........all I know is the Electrobraid did not take a wrap on her body or legs.

No fencing is entirely safe.......lets face it horses can hurt themselves in a padded room.!!!

Dalemma

Lady Counselor
Jul. 3, 2010, 11:24 AM
Hey thanks for all the valuable input here. I have some new considerations for the two paddocks yet to be built and the perimiter fencing around my upper piece.
And thanks especially for the photos. The visuals help a lot!

paintjumper
Jul. 3, 2010, 11:33 AM
I am not saying it was 5/6 out of 10/12. It was plenty hot......good luck with yours, you seem very happy with it. Me....not so much. And yeah, horses can get hurt in a pink rubber room filled with cloud stuffing.

SouthwestRerider
Jul. 3, 2010, 06:31 PM
We pretty much HAVE to use all pipe and/or panels here in my part of AZ. We get 2" oil field pipe out of Tx and have it welded. My favorite section is where we used 5' no climb topped with pipe. We still have some three rail pipe perimiter fence but it lets in neighbor dogs and is too short. My pens (runs) are all panel, which I like, but have irregular rounded shapes to them so we did not have to add permanent posts. I wanted to try wood fence, but the high dry heat alternated with high moist heat alternated with freezing winters, absolutely destroys wood. We also have no irrigation, so no pasture.
But the pipe stand up- even to the cribbing stallion the neighbors put in over my back fence. A little off topic- but the young stallion has NO uppers left due to cribbing on pipe.
(When I mentioned to the neighbors, who don't live on the property where they are keeping the stallion, that their horse cribbed- they had no idea what I was talking about! A year later his teeth are gone, the cribbing collar suggestion unheeded, and he has never been worked with or taken out of the dry lot we call pasture here. I guess I need to open a separate rant topic.)

fordtraktor
Jul. 3, 2010, 07:43 PM
Even good fencing can hurt horses badly on occasion. S&$*( happens.

My 20 year old retired TB got in a terrible accident last winter on our properly installed Centaur fence (the wide, looks like 4 rail stuff). He reared up and stuck his leg through the slats, close to a fence post, and got hung behind his elbow. It took four people an hour to get him out.

He had a hole you could stick your arm in in his "armpit" area. He could barely move for 2 days and we were worried we were going to lose him. He's fine now, thank goodness.

Horses will hurt themselves on anything. You do what you can to reduce issues, but complete safety is impossible.

deltawave
Jul. 3, 2010, 08:37 PM
the constant zapping of the electricty Electrobraid can (and should, IMO) be installed with a sensor (Fence Minder) that will turn off the shocking if/when the fence is grounded, so a horse that gets hung up in it will not be shocked for more than 3 seconds. This thing plugs in and takes about 15 seconds to install. You can even get a gadget that is wired to the Fence Minder to set off an alarm if this happens, page your cell phone if this happens, or send you a text message. Awesome. :)

Since I have branches fall on the fence every now and then, I don't have the alarm set, but I know instantly when I walk into the barn if the Fence Minder has grounded out the fence because the comfortable "ticking" sound from the tack room is silent and a big red light is on.

MistyBlue
Jul. 3, 2010, 11:40 PM
Horsepoor, do go with the brown or black. It looks fantastic and you can't see when it gets some mold spots on it. Pretty important for you in the PNW! :winkgrin:

Look at Ayrabz photos...the darker colors do look great. I wanted the dark brown, but Mr Blue almost had a mental breakdown over that, LOL! He told me in no uncertain terms:
ALL horse fencing is SUPPOSED to be WHITE! :D :lol: :eek: :D
O-k-a-y sweetie...we'll get white!
He has visions of those huge Kentucky TB breeding farms all done in white fencing...or that all "real" farms have all white fencing because that's what you see on TV.
Since it meant so much to him, we did white.
Of course I'm the one that has to keep up the sparkling white paint on all those giant round posts. :lol:

The mold is easy to get rid of, I use a small 2 gallon pump sprayer and fill it 50/50 bleach and water. I walk the fence line and spray it down. 5 minutes later the fence is all sparkling white again.

But I don't have miles of fencing, it's not as wet here in CT and I only have to do that every other year or so. So go with dark fencing. :yes:

ReSomething
Jul. 3, 2010, 11:45 PM
MB, you can tell Mr MB from me that all horse fencing in KY is BLACK. Black, black, black, (well with the exception of Calumet Farm). So there is an honorable precedent for dark colors.

horsepoor
Jul. 4, 2010, 12:12 AM
Horsepoor, do go with the brown or black. It looks fantastic and you can't see when it gets some mold spots on it. Pretty important for you in the PNW! :winkgrin:


Oh, I already know -- we have the brown Centaur up on an existing pasture already. We did 3 rails and now that we are adding new pasture, I'm thinking of just doing one big rail with the coated wire below, like what you did. But, geez, getting brown Centaur took some effort as everyone wanted to convince us that we needed to go white (I think they stocked it and brown was special order). One other plus point - no need to paint the wood posts to match as they are already brown!

bumblesmama
Jul. 4, 2010, 07:33 AM
There is rope fencing and then there is Electrobraid.....two different products.........we have some fencing companys up here that try to pass off electric rope as the same stuff as Electrobraid....but it differences are like night and day......strength being one of them and the fact that Electrobraid has to be tensioned the rope cannot be tensioned just tightened.......and when Electrobraid is installed properly and NOT used as crossing fencing unless you have a 12' alley between(per manufacturers instructions)....it is the safest fencing I have come across


Dalemmma


Do you by any chance have links showing the differences? I am redoing our entire set-up and was going to use 3-strand 1/4" of what I thought was Electrobraid but now I am not sure. I didn't know there were differences between what they are calling rope and electrobraid. So any info showing differences between the two and what brands are involved would be helpful. I was 90% sure I was going to use Ghallagher 1/4".

Thanks!

MistyBlue
Jul. 4, 2010, 08:52 AM
MB, you can tell Mr MB from me that all horse fencing in KY is BLACK. Black, black, black, (well with the exception of Calumet Farm). So there is an honorable precedent for dark colors.

Hee hee, I did try telling him. But he insisted that what he saw on TV was the right color fencing and it was all white. :winkgrin: I even tried to convince him that what he was remembering was TV shows from ages ago like Dallas and Falcon Crest and those weren't even in Kentucky! :lol:
He does love that white fence though. It's VERY visible...we're really wooded and you really can't miss seeing blazing white fence through the trees! I think that's what he likes about it, he's a very visual guy. I'd have preferred something that blended a tad bit.

Horsepoor...I do really like the the one rail of flex with the coated wire underneath. :yes: I can set it close and use more "rails" from a roll of coated wire. (Ramm sells it at around 1320' IIRC) I liked the look, and it was much easier over the years to re-tension the wire than the Flex. The Flex takes two people, two socket wrenches and a tad bit of swearing. Not that it's hard and it's fast to do but a pita when you need two people. (I do everything solo around here and am a bit uncoordinated, LOL)
The coated wire takes one socket wrench with right sized socket and about two seconds, one hand and no strength to tension a line right back up again. Not that it needs it much...maybe once every few years if your posts "droop" a bit over time.

I like Ayrabz set up too...the multi-rails look pretty and very traditional. I like adding the second hot line near the bottom too. Although you can do that with the coated wire too.

I know a coupe folks who've used the Flex as a top rail and done similar to mine with the multiple lines of coated wire...but instead of coated wire they used electrobraid or something hot on all the strands. Now that would keep anything in or out! :eek: :lol:

Polydor
Jul. 4, 2010, 09:07 AM
We have a couple different combinations of fencing here. For the most part we have 3-4 (sometimes 5) strands of bayco fencing with a strand of electric wire on top about 1 foot inside. I had never used bayco before. Overall i do like it, had a few legs caught to various degrees of seriousness. Do like the fact that it will break if needed ( or sometimes due to kangaroos going under/through the fence! )

We also use chicken wire/ no climb type fencing with the electric wire on top set inside. Also normally has a few plain wire running through the chicken wire/no climb to keep it up right. We use this depending on if the sheep have to use the lanes ways to move to different pastures. No fun trying to keep sheep out of the horse paddocks!! Been there before!

We also have at least 2 gates on every paddock on different sides.

P.

katarine
Jul. 4, 2010, 09:59 AM
If the encroaching Southern jungle was not an issue, I'd love to have 4 strands of Hot Cote.

Lacking that, I'd love to have no climb topped with a strand of Hot Cote.

What I have is a mix of many types of fence. I think I have a herd of wee children getting into my borrowed field, which is out of sight from the house. Kat's not happy. IF I had no climb topped with some heat, I'd sleep better.

kookicat
Jul. 4, 2010, 10:09 AM
Depends where you look. Most of it is post and rail with a hot wire. Some parts are hedges with hotwire.

Mali
Jul. 4, 2010, 10:33 AM
The paddocks are fenced in Electrobraid, the barnyard in 5 board 2x6's (black), the arena in black Horserail flexible rail, and the dividing fence is Horseguard white tape.
Electrobraid - easy to install, always electrified, nice to know I can fix it by myself if the need ever arose (hasn't in 6 years), still looks great, never has needed tightening or any maintenance.
Board - has been painted 3 times in 6 years, has warped in a few minor places, still looks good and strong (bullified)
Horserail - definately needs to be professional installed OR you need the assistance of about 3 or 4 other people to help. Needs to be tightened few times/year, looks wonderful, not electric so the horses have learned to put their heads thru to eat, which is why we need to do so much maintenance to it
Horseguard - semi-easy to install, always electrified, is starting to show just a little wear in 4 years (but it's not been as tight as should be)
In order of overall preference - Horseguard, Electrobraid, Horserail, board. Looks are not necessarily my determining factor.

Dalemma
Jul. 4, 2010, 10:56 AM
Do you by any chance have links showing the differences? I am redoing our entire set-up and was going to use 3-strand 1/4" of what I thought was Electrobraid but now I am not sure. I didn't know there were differences between what they are calling rope and electrobraid. So any info showing differences between the two and what brands are involved would be helpful. I was 90% sure I was going to use Ghallagher 1/4".

Thanks!

Here is a link to what Electrobraid looks like.

http://www.electrobraid.com/enlarge.html

I have only seen the rope in person......as a few friends have the rope which breaks really easy in comparison to the Electrobraid

With Electrobraid you have to have a really strong cross bracing system in place due to the tension the rope is under with the other "rope" no cross bracing is necessary.....I use metal posts in 3' of concrete with diagonal bracing also in concrete......I think I posted pics in one of my replies.....go and take a look.

I know some one in my area that said she was putting in Electrobraid......I took one look at the pictures she posted and knew from the fencing that it was just rope.....but she thought she had Electrobraid.

I will see if I can find you a picture of just the rope.

If you notice in the link I gave you Electrobraid is very shiny and smooth looking the other rope that I am talking about is not shiny and is not smooth ..it gets little hairs sticking out of it over time.


Dalemma

Dalemma

mpsbarnmanager
Jul. 4, 2010, 11:30 AM
I had 2 horses get wrapped in that stuff and one almost cut his hind leg off, took me, my husband, and the vet all working together at the same time, more than 3 hours to sew him back up...we almost lost him . The other one was not as bad but still ended up with about 30 stitches. The mess won't break, no matter what!!"
May ask (becaure I am considering getting it) how the horses got tangled up in it? It seems to me the only way that could happen is it it were sagging and the electricity was compromised. I don't mean to offend at all, just don't want that to be me! Thank you!

Dalemma
Jul. 4, 2010, 11:43 AM
We have a couple different combinations of fencing here. For the most part we have 3-4 (sometimes 5) strands of bayco fencing with a strand of electric wire on top about 1 foot inside. I had never used bayco before. Overall i do like it, had a few legs caught to various degrees of seriousness. Do like the fact that it will break if needed ( or sometimes due to kangaroos going under/through the fence! )

We also use chicken wire/ no climb type fencing with the electric wire on top set inside. Also normally has a few plain wire running through the chicken wire/no climb to keep it up right. We use this depending on if the sheep have to use the lanes ways to move to different pastures. No fun trying to keep sheep out of the horse paddocks!! Been there before!

We also have at least 2 gates on every paddock on different sides.

P.

Bayco has incredible stretch and can easily take a wrap on a horses leg.

Dalemma

paintjumper
Jul. 4, 2010, 03:23 PM
It was a 4 strand electrobraid that was tight, like I said in an earlier post, you could hit it with a pipe and it would "ping". The one that got hurt the worst, we think he laid down close to it to roll and stuck his back legs through it (the last two strands closest to the ground) somehow....it was horrible. The other one, still needed 30 stitches, only got one of his back legs in it but we did not see either incident, they were about 2 months apart. I know it was the fence because there was some sag in it after both times that the horses got hurt. I snatched that fence down and piled it up in the burn pile, later what was left got sent to the landfill. As you can assume, I don't recommend it.

KrazyTBMare
Jul. 4, 2010, 04:15 PM
I forgot to put up pics.

Sorry I dont have pics of JUST the fence. Its in the background!

This is my crossfence with 3 strands of hot Horseguard in brown. The posts are the round 4x4 pressure treated that we painted black with the Black Beauty Fence paint.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/July%208%20Great/2007-07-08400a.jpg

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/IMG_0088.jpg

This is the middle fence that was existing when we moved here. It splits the property into the two halves. It has those 6x6 round posts that are split in 1/2 and then obviously 1x6 on top with no climb.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/IMG_0809a.jpg

The perimeter fence that was existing when we moved in, "3 board" with an X in the middle. There is no climb on the inside with a strand of hot Horseguard on the top inside edge.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/IMG_0190a.jpg

Closer pic of the X fence... excuse the water - thats when Fay came through!

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/IMG_5362a.jpg

I will also say that the Horseguard is very tough but no damaging. The small section near the barn that is like 50' long is on a seperate fence charger, NOW. I used to not have it hot, hoping that they wouldnt test it b/c the main fence is hot.

Well my boarders horse does NOT respect fence that isnt hot or solid, and he had pulled it down a few times and it never even messed up his hair. Now that I have it hot, he nor my now 3 yr old have touched it. A good charger goes a long way. I also dont worry about them leaning over the wood fence to try to eat things on the other side, chew on the wood, or get too friendly with the neighborhood kids b/c they know the fence bites pretty hard.

My Horseguard has been through a hurricane and LOTS of tropical storms and even after all that, I have only had to retighten them like 2-3 times in 4 years.

Polydor
Jul. 5, 2010, 09:49 AM
Bayco has incredible stretch and can easily take a wrap on a horses leg.

Dalemma

Totally agree with you but considering how many horses we have on property (150-200ish) we don't have that many incidences with the fencing.

What also helps is that the pastures are bigger then most commonly found in north america. Our smallest pasture is 28acres but average around 50-70 acres. Lots of room to run and play and roll and they don't have to be right on the fence line.

P.

MistyBlue
Jul. 5, 2010, 11:03 AM
Size of turnouts does make an enormous impact on type of fencing needed/used. Horses have room, no need to test fencing and not many owners can fence in that much acreage with the expensive stuff. Can't imagine trying to afford the fencing I have (and it isn't overly expensive either) on that much acreage! :eek: At $5 or so a linear foot??? Ouch!

However, having that much acreage....*sigh* Would be nice. Well, not THAT much in fenced pasture because I'd feel a need to fill them with horses or have a lot of mowing and fence upkeep. ;)

But the smaller the acreage and/or turnouts...the beefier the fence needs to be usually.

Dalemma
Jul. 5, 2010, 11:03 AM
Totally agree with you but considering how many horses we have on property (150-200ish) we don't have that many incidences with the fencing.

What also helps is that the pastures are bigger then most commonly found in north america. Our smallest pasture is 28acres but average around 50-70 acres. Lots of room to run and play and roll and they don't have to be right on the fence line.

P.

Yup the bigger the property the safer it is....just like barb wire.....wouldn't have it on small acreages but when you are talking hundreds of acres......then that changes things some what.

Dalemma

deltawave
Jul. 5, 2010, 11:30 AM
all horse fencing in KY is BLACK.

Not the Kentucky Horse Park . . .

ReSomething
Jul. 5, 2010, 11:46 AM
Horse Park doesn't count. So there.

ETA Actually I take that back. The most public places are Calumet, right across from the airport pretty much, and the Horse Park, and they have white fences, but the first time I came to KY I went through Frankfort to Lex via I64 and I remember sitting in the car with my nose pressed to the glass and saying "but they're all blaaack".
Most horse farms in KY paint with some nasty smelling black paint, same as they paint tobacco barns. Hwy 25 south from Georgetown, black fences with those lovely stone walls. Payne's Depot Rd, which I think is 62 south of Georgetown, home of Old Friends TB retirement, more black fences. My current trainer, my old H/J barn, Lakeside Arena . . .

deltawave
Jul. 5, 2010, 12:31 PM
I am torn. I think both look great on vast, wide, sweeping acres of bluegrass. But white (or black) four-plank fencing would make my property look like a rat maze. I'm all about proportioning fences to suit the acreage. :yes:

shakeytails
Jul. 5, 2010, 02:03 PM
If you could use any fencing at all, what would you choose?

If money were no object, I would have V-mesh no-climb with a top sight rail made of that vinyl coated wood.

My second choice is 4 rail Centaur, in black so the mold wouldn't show. I was going to buy some Centaur, but the posts really need to be driven, not dug, and I couldn't find a driver without purchasing one.

What do I have now?

1.) Some 3-board fence- high maintanence but it looks pretty.

2.) Mostly HT box wire, some with a hot wire on top, some that needs a hot wire on top.

3.) Smooth HT wire around the pond, 5-strands I think, every other wire hot. It's a good visual barrier, and the horses don't mess with it. I wanted to put board fence there, but it's almost impossible to get wood posts deep enough there to support a more solid fence.

4.) Electric tape on step in posts- to keep my 2 horsepower lawnmower (old mares) contained.

5.) Old barbed wire. Obviously not ideal, but it keeps the horses out of the hay field. Only mature horses have access to this, and it's a big pasture with no animals on the other side so they don't mess with the fence. When I replace it it will be with 5-6 strands of HT.

6.) On the old farm I had Electrobraid. Loved it! Even kept mamas and babies in it. They never went near it because it was HOT.

Alot of folks would have a hissy fit at my fencing. I have big pastures/paddocks and sensible horses. Most all of my horses are barefoot-so no worries about shoes getting caught in wire. Foals and youngsters only go out in board fence or box wire. Stallions or anything with shoes in board fence only. You just have to know your horses. My "lawnmowers" would stay behind a single strand of baler twine (and occasionally have!) and be safe.

EAH
Jul. 5, 2010, 06:09 PM
Small paddocks are 2 to 3 inch oil well pipe welded and placed in ground with concrete. Expensive but no maintenance. I use 2 to three rails. Large pastures are Oil well pipe welded with posts and upper rail then v mesh either by itself or applied on top of stockade panels that are 1/4 inch wire that were here before I bought the place. That is VERY sturdy and I use it for babies. The stockade panel are welded to the oil pipe and all posts are in concrete.

Do not like no climb with the rectangles. It is not as tough as the V mesh. Have tried Cameo--too stretchy.

theoldgreymare
Jul. 6, 2010, 07:48 PM
Perimeter fence is wood board. All pastures are cross fenced in Horseguard tape on wood posts.

If I could do any type of fencing, it would all be wood board with a hot tape to keep the beasties off of it. What I would avoid like the plague.....barbed wire and high tensile wire. I know people who love the high tensile but I have seen some pretty nasty accidents resulting from it so it is not for me.

dmalbone
Jul. 7, 2010, 10:16 AM
What do you use? Horseguard Brand- like Centaur and Ramm- made by the co. that makes Ramm. I chose them because it was cheaper honestly. We used the 4.25" top flex rail with alternating three strands of coated wire and three strands of coated hot wire. The coated hot wire is basically the same price so ALL of the strands can be hot if I put insulators up after I change the (incorrectly installed) ends. Want to say 1320' of the black coated hot wire was $170 or something.

Pro's? LOVE IT. It's hot, flexible, safe, CHEAP, and I think it looks pretty good! The horses touched it once and only once. :lol:

Cons? I would have liked the solidness of no-climb, but didn't want the $$$ or the installation and repair hassle. Don't really have any other ones yet.

If you could use any fencing at all, what would you choose?
I would love a perimeter fence of no climb with an interior fence the same as I used. I would prefer in my dream world to have 3 of the flex rails with strands of coated hot wire between but that's just purely for looks. I love the stuff.

And what would you avoid like the plaque? Bare hot wire, bare wire, barbed wire.

shortbusgeek
Jul. 7, 2010, 02:07 PM
We'll be ordering our Centaur supplies the day of or day after closing on our new farm. :D We currently have 3 board black fencing with 4x4 posts and electric 1/4" run along the top rail.

katie16
Jul. 8, 2010, 01:30 PM
I've worked many years at a farm with split rail fencing (3 rails high).

The big pros of it I see are:

NO NAILS required - (don't worry about one loosening and a horse catching himself on it - or one popping out and someone stepping on it).

VERY STURDY - because the rails are thick they last a long time and stand up to horses rubbing on them, kicking them, etc. quite well.

The big con I see is:

We usually keep some on hand "just in case" we need one. We can't easily go down to the local lumber yard and get one if we need it like you might be able to with a regular board.

Because the rail ends are tapered and not identical in width, it can take trying a couple different rails to get them to fit into the post "slot".

We have had one "smart a$$" 4yr old colt figure out how to grab the rails and pull them out!