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View Full Version : Crossties - likes, dislikes & more



easyrider
Jul. 1, 2010, 02:10 PM
Hi everyone. I'm putting up crossties in between two run-in sheds and all my options are open. I have two old iron rings I can screw in to the posts wherever I want. But I don't know exactly where I want. How high is best? And then, what crossties do I choose? I don't like chains. Rope? Something more modern? Your experiences and insight desired!

SmartAlex
Jul. 1, 2010, 03:02 PM
Rings should be as high or higher than the poll of you tallest horse. I've even seen them hung from ceiling height (8 feetish?)

Mine are blocker rings with ropes. I prefer that over the nylon or chain, although I do have smooth chain (as in not dog chain) ties for going to shows. Love the Blocker Rings! Very adjustable and since I have mine in a grooming stall, not an aisle, they are very safe.

I've never had the bungee ones. The very thought of them scares me.

inca
Jul. 1, 2010, 03:03 PM
I personally don't care for cross ties.

I use the Blocker Ring to tie with the lead line and love it. You can also use the Blocker Ring for cross ties also.

http://www.smartpakequine.com/productclass.aspx?productClassid=6004

sisu27
Jul. 1, 2010, 03:09 PM
Hate the stretchy kind. Have a horse now that has figured out just how stretchy they are and will twist and turn and lean until you rescue him. It scares the hell out of me and I am going to get rid of them. I have imagined that just as I turn towards the thing it reaches the point that the snap gives and takes my eye out.

I like bailer twine on a high ring with a nylon cross tie with safety clip on end. And I always leave the throat unlatched on my halters too.

ChocoMare
Jul. 1, 2010, 03:36 PM
I L-O-V-E the Velcro Cross Ties. They have the traditional panic snaps, but the end that attaches to the halter is double covered in velcro. Should a horse pull, it stays. Should they pull hard or panic, it separates safely.

cyndi
Jul. 1, 2010, 03:54 PM
Turtle snaps.

http://www.equinenow.com/store-item-25594

FoxChaser
Jul. 1, 2010, 04:30 PM
Check out this thread http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=228440&highlight=the+clip+crossties I use The Clip http://www.theclip.info/ for my crossties and love it! Check out the video on the website. ETA You can adjust the amount of tension necessary for the horse to undo itself unlike the Blocker rings and don't have the noise associated with the velcro crossties (I personally hate those since 1. they are noisy, 2. the horses learn that they can break free at will, and 3. they never velcro back together quite right after having come undone a time or two).

Haf N Haf
Jul. 1, 2010, 04:50 PM
Both of my horses regularly undo themselves from the blocker rings at my barn. :rolleyes: So I have to loop through and then around which pretty much defeats the purpose. If I had my own barn (and I have these in my trailer) I agree with ChocoMare on the Equips Tie Safe safety velcro cross-ties. I had to buy cross-tie length for my trailer because the hooks are waaaaaaay up at the top and I have little horses. :lol:

Equips Safe Tie Velcro Cross-Ties (http://www.adamshorsesupply.com/browse.cfm/4,4570.html)

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Jul. 1, 2010, 09:38 PM
I have never seen the benefit of cross-tying. Who came up with this idea, anyway?

Every single time something goes wrong, one always has to rush over and unclip the crosstie from the wall so the horse doesn't freak out/flip over/etc. So why not just tie the beast with one tie to begin with?:confused:

Or, while the cross-tied horse is blocking the aisle, there are always people wanting to lead another horse past. Once again, one must undo one cross-tie. Or allow the other person to lead her horse under the cross-tie, thus courting disaster.

And then there is the fun to be had when one has a horse in cross-ties and someone else's horse gets loose and goes flying through the barn.

Why do we cross-tie, again?

RougeEmpire
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:40 AM
I have never seen the benefit of cross-tying. Who came up with this idea, anyway?

Every single time something goes wrong, one always has to rush over and unclip the crosstie from the wall so the horse doesn't freak out/flip over/etc. So why not just tie the beast with one tie to begin with?:confused:

Or, while the cross-tied horse is blocking the aisle, there are always people wanting to lead another horse past. Once again, one must undo one cross-tie. Or allow the other person to lead her horse under the cross-tie, thus courting disaster.

And then there is the fun to be had when one has a horse in cross-ties and someone else's horse gets loose and goes flying through the barn.

Why do we cross-tie, again?

THIS.

Personally i hate them, leaving a horse "floating" in a barn alley often ends in disaster. I think people get really lazing when it comes to cross ties. Walking horses and ponies under the lines whilst squeezing in between a horse and a stall in an already narrow barn alley. I MUCH prefer to rail tie or tie up in a stall. Yes _I_ am a little more inconvenienced but the horses seem much more content and there seems to be way less "incidents" of horses getting anxious and worried about having BOTH sides of head tied to he can't look around, move to SEE whats going on or looking behind him to check out who's coming up.

Rhyadawn
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:48 AM
I like a nylon or cotton lead. I have a ring up 7ish feet high, and some twine tied down from that in a large loop so I can tie whatever I happen to have in my hand at the moment attached to my horse.

I prefer to single tie, but that might have developed out of lazyness or the fact that I work with so many youngsters who haven't quite figured out this whole crosstie thing yet.

BellaLuna
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:19 AM
A Blocker Ring fan here too. But my horses are never unattended while on cross ties. Never experienced issues, but fully understand the risks of crosstying.

bumblesmama
Jul. 2, 2010, 09:58 AM
Single-tie hitching rail fan here (groundtying for one of my mares, but only in the paddock or ring). Making a new rail this weekend actually. I always used cross-ties throughout my boarding 'career' because I didn't know there was another option. But now with my own place, I have discovered the freedom and ease of just single-tie with quick release knot and my horses just stand still, for anything and everything.

I have a toddler I am busy with and ended up leaving my mare at the rail and she was still there calm as can be just hanging out by herself for 45 mins. I kept taking peeks out there to make sure she was ok, but she was just hanging out without a care in the world. I don't make a habit of that but I am fairly confident that where I tie my mares, they will be relaxed and hang out until I am finished and we are ready to move on.

I wouldn't just leave any horse there but in my experience with cross ties, even just a few mins, the horses would get fidgety.

ReSomething
Jul. 2, 2010, 11:24 AM
I have to laugh, because I am in the "why exactly do we cross tie?" camp but I have them at home for bathing and clipping. We have two nylon lines set up between two shade trees close to water and power. I want to get the claw variety clips for quick release but when I set it up there were none available.
It's been my experience that if you put a fuse in there sooner or later they figure it out and then they acquire the nasty habit of pulling back on every tie, hoping to bust it and go awanderin'.
For grooming and saddling I tie to the pen rails and basically perform the operation in the pen.

CatOnLap
Jul. 2, 2010, 11:34 AM
so I suppose you guys who cross tie in the aisle don't have a proper wash and grooming stall? I never understood barns that had cross ties blcoking the main alleyway. Single tie those suckers and teach them to stand against the wall, or don't take them out of their stalls. What a pain that is in the busy stable! especially when inconsderate owners leave them cross tied while they take a leisurely smoke, bathroom or coffee break. Cross tied horses should never be left unsupervised anyway. In my stable, any unattended horse left tied is quickly returned to their own stall, sans tack, before they decide to do it themselves.

Best thing I put in my barn was a separate grooming stall. In a pinch I can put a pipe corral section across the front and have a spare stall, and when using it for its proper purpose, horses are never in the way of anyone else.

Aside from hanging the rings as high as you can comfortably reach (remember you are going to have to tie things to them- you don't want to need a ladder), if you use plain iron rings, then tie a loop of binder twine to the ring and attach your leadropes to that instead. It breaks if the horse tries to wreck, but is secure enough for most horses that stand nicely.

My stablehand single tied a mare to the iron ring directly the other day, although I had warned her to always use the twine loop and preferably to cross tie that particular mare,(who learned at a kids' camp to pull back and break the leadrope) . Well, for some reason, she didn't remember, the mare pulled back, broke the brass snap on the brand new lead rope, sat on her butt in the aisle, rubbed her poll with the halter and when recovering, stomped the stablehand's foot really really good. Thank heavens the mare is barefoot and goes in a war bridle so I don't have to use any poll pressure for a couple of weeks.

msj
Jul. 2, 2010, 11:50 AM
I will only use rope for X-ties. The rings that attach to the wall are probably 6-7' high. It was 20 yrs ago when I put them up and I'm too lazy to go out and measure for an accurate height, but as someone said, at least as high as the poll on your tallest horse.

At the end of the rope toward the horse is a metal ring with baling twine (not the nylon twine) attached to a double end snap. If the horse pulls back, the twine breaks. I've seen a lot of people attach the baling twine to the high end of the X-ties so the rope is still attached to the horse to make for easy catching. I don't want to have to get a ladder out to replace the twine if it breaks which is why I do it at the snap end. The snap stays attached to the halter but has never caused an injury.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Jul. 2, 2010, 12:06 PM
CatOnLap - no, both barns where I've boarded had separate wash stalls, with cross-ties, but horses were still groomed and tacked on aisleway cross-ties. The wash stall was only used for, er, washing.:)

At one barn, I owned my own horse the entire time and just tacked up in the stall.

But at the other, for much of the time, I was riding school horses, and those were not to be groomed or tacked in the stalls. I don't know for sure, but I think the BO worried about the students getting hurt in the stall with the horse - the clientele at that barn, although good riders, were not really horsepeople. So that may have been the reason for the policy.

My own horse is far less fidgety when single-tied. Or not tied at all - now that he's home, I just put the halter on and throw the lead rope over his back. I'm working up to having him stand still without even that - he was doing so for awhile but recently turned back into a travellin' man.:winkgrin: So I have the halter and lead to reinforce "stand" if needed.:)

But of course that's one of the luxuries of having a horse at home. I wouldn't subject my fellow boarders' nerves to an untied horse - I always hated it when other boarders did that to me.

sublimequine
Jul. 2, 2010, 02:46 PM
Anything but bungee/stretchy material.

walktrot
Jul. 2, 2010, 05:17 PM
I think I'm going to look for those velcro ties. The barn where I board has about a 15' wide aisleway that's 200' long and for the most part uses cross ties in the stall area, and head ties elsewhere. The set I use has regular old hay string on the nylon ties, which my horse has broken twice this month, spooking at some unknown hazard. The funny thing about him is if he is facing looking down that 200' he will stand straight. But if you have him facing out the back door, he'll move around until he can stand sideways and watch both directions. I also need to spend more time on ground tying, but he keeps wandering off...

Dalemma
Jul. 2, 2010, 07:04 PM
I personally do not like cross ties.......think they are one of the more dangerous ways to tie........tying to a wall or post using "The Clip"

Dalemma

calatar
Jul. 3, 2010, 10:41 AM
I also don't care for cross tying. Most of the time my guys ground tie. If I'm actually tieing then I prefer the clip over the tie blocker.

http://www.smarttieproducts.com/

Thomas_1
Jul. 3, 2010, 10:53 AM
In the UK it's VERY VERY rare for anyone to ever cross tie a horse.

Here it tends to be used only when there's a real need to keep the horse still and secure for such as veterinary treatment. We do it here using 2 ropes from each side of the headcollar, passing to tie rings on 2 posts or to the 2 sides of a stall. I personally don't the need other than that at all.

The tie is always using quick-release knots.

easyrider
Jul. 4, 2010, 07:40 PM
Interesting comments. Thank you all. I should have searched, too, before posting but I appreciate everyone's feedback. Now, I'm thinking about doing both crossties and a single tie - the blocker looks great. I do like horses to be able to go anywhere and do anything (like crosstie) so it's something I'll probably continue but I'll also expand our horizons here. Thanks again.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Jul. 4, 2010, 08:43 PM
In the UK it's VERY VERY rare for anyone to ever cross tie a horse.

Thomas, I noticed that when I was a member of NewRider for about ten years.

Here in the US, cross-tying is the norm - but my internet friends in the UK thought it was definitely the exception.:yes:

As I've learned more about horses, I too rarely see the need to cross-tie. Seems to create more problems than it solves, IME.

goeslikestink
Jul. 4, 2010, 09:12 PM
Thomas, I noticed that when I was a member of NewRider for about ten years.

Here in the US, cross-tying is the norm - but my internet friends in the UK thought it was definitely the exception.:yes:

As I've learned more about horses, I too rarely see the need to cross-tie. Seems to create more problems than it solves, IME.

am on new rider lol, yeah heres its highly unlikely that you would go into yards even diy whatever and find a horse on x ties,

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Jul. 4, 2010, 09:18 PM
am on new rider lol,

I remember.:) I miss everyone, but I bailed when NR when to subscription. Ten pounds/year isn't much, but at the time I was skint.;)

RainDancer
Jul. 4, 2010, 09:53 PM
I love cross ties. Really got hooked on them when I worked for a Standardbred stable. There, they are an absolute necessity.

I like nylon boat rope. I make them myself using clamps like what are on leads. I put a panic snap on each end and a brass snap on that. I have several release spots if I need it.

Where I am from, most people use cross ties so you learn to walk a horse by and it isn't hard. I put my ties either from the rafters or 8" up on poles. I have had many more problems with single ties. The vet and farrier both prefer them for working. Makes grooming and clipping easier because there is more room to move around and not get pinched into a wall.

calatar
Jul. 4, 2010, 10:54 PM
I will not trim a horse that is solid tied, let alone cross tied...seen and heard of too many injuries.

sk_pacer
Jul. 4, 2010, 11:09 PM
What a lot of us on the Standardbred tracks here do is take a length of medium chain or 3/4" rope and string it up around 12' or so off the floor and across the aisle. We then put light rope drops on the chain to just below halter height of the shortest horse and attach a quick release snap to each rope. It gives you lots of head room to drive under (very important) and no fiddling reaching for the ties across a 10' or wider aisle. This also allows someone to pass by without fighting with the crossties and a bike or even another horse.

tabula rashah
Jul. 5, 2010, 04:50 PM
I personally am quite fond of horses and find the majority of the problems that people have are because they don't take the time to teach the horses how to stand in cross ties. All of my horses cross tie, regular tie and ground tie. I think the cross ties are great for activities where the horse might tend to be wiggly or things like injections where they need to stand still. I also do all my own farrier work and like them for working on a horse who thinks they need to have their mouth or nose on my all the time. I prefer the rope or nylon ones attached to the wall (or whatever) by taking the hardware off and looping bailing twine through.

Bif
Jul. 5, 2010, 11:02 PM
I believe in the above the pole height, not too long (twisting around? then they are too long and/or your area is too wide) and really the aisle/area shouldn't be wider than the 11 or 12 feet. Cross ties in a 16 or 24 foot space are a bad idea. 8-10 feet space is ideal.

My first horse came to me as a known crosstie breaker... sigh. I really agree it is a matter of how you train them to tie. Of late, my method to train to tie (this has been mature horses, but with no tying experience) is to straight tie them with a (home-made for less than $6) blocker tie, while grooming. You are doing a pleasant exercise while they learn about tying. Do this in a variety of places, easy to move if you tie a strong rope around a post and have the blocker treaded through it, portable anywhere. Do not do objectionable things, since they are learning tying.

After a time (days or weeks, depending on horse), they got straight tied to a small tree that offered some flex, but not like the blocker. They all will pick the fight eventually, but gave it up.

In cross ties, I used blockers for both sides for a while, once the horse was solid straight tying without a blocker, the crosstie blockers were not necessary.

My real secret, not sure how much it helped, was I NEVER backed any horse out of crossties, or straight tie, either. Always lead forward and turn around if you have to. Horses that I had trained to tie might try to jump forward out of the ties, but none have ever tried to sit down and pulling back is how they break out (and flip themselves over). They learned pulling doesn't ever release them.

My horse will crosstie as long as you need him to, in sight, out of sight, and quiet. I imagine if I was out of sight and firecrackers were set off by him he would be a dancing sweating mess, but still securely in the crossties.

baysngreys
Jul. 6, 2010, 01:10 PM
Can you put a rail across the back of the "tie" area? We had a similar set-up between the end of the barn and a hay shed. We could slide the "butt bar" in or out as needed.

I've always cross-tied, at home, at boarding barns, at shows. Personally, don't like barns that use the aisles to cross tie but that was the norm when I was a kid, all the horses learned to duck under the ropes.

Have always set the rings at eye level or slightly above, cotton or nylon ropes attached with quick releases snaps at the wall, not at the halter. If you've ever seen a panicked horse you don't want to get anywhere near the flailing hooves to pull the quick release.

I've seen horses freak out in cross ties, tied to a rail, post, blocker, in a trailer. It can happen on any given day.
We all try to teach our horses to stand properly and patiently, but they are animals of flight and if panicked will want to leave, as quickly as possible!

Worst I ever saw was a horse that pulled back, on cross ties, managed to get one of the posts out of the ground and ran around with the posts attached to his halter, "chasing" him.