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View Full Version : Inexpensive dog-proof fencing to add to existing fence?



kdow
Jun. 30, 2010, 12:56 AM
Okay, so, technically in my case, this is not farm-related since I don't have a farm. But I figure it's a problem folks with farms probably also have to deal with, so hopefully the information in the thread will be useful to more folks than just me. :)

My situation is that I have an existing 'fence' (deck railing, actually) that is pretty lame. My cocker spaniel could scoot right under the lowest rail with no trouble, and I'm sure my rotti-mix could get under by just doing the doggy version of the limbo. I would like to 'dog proof' it in a way which is hopefully not hideously ugly (deck is on the front of the house) but that will keep the dogs on the deck, so I can gate off the deck and let the dogs hang out outside without someone actively watching them.

(They'd have shade and water, and someone outside; just maybe reading a book or something instead of keeping an eye on the dogs every second.)

I know probably anything I can do on the cheap is likely to be more of a deterrent than actually determined-dog-proof, but I'm mostly trying to discourage them from peering over the edge and maybe having an accident.

So what would you add to an existing post-and-rail type fence to discourage dogs from ducking underneath it? (Replacing the basic structure isn't an option right now, because the whole thing needs to be replaced at some point - I don't really want to waste money fixing up part of it and then have to redo it again in a couple years.)

(I'm hoping this is farm-related enough because I can easily imagine someone wanting to be able to put something around, for example, the bottom of the arena fencing to discourage barn dogs from cutting across.)

Gryhnd
Jun. 30, 2010, 07:36 AM
I would add wire square fencing "chicken wire", some variation of that, with small enough holes. We did that when our previous yard just had post/rail fencing (neighbors), we just tacked the square wire fencing to our side. Worked fine for our dalmatian.

CB/TB
Jun. 30, 2010, 07:47 AM
The chicken wire suggested should be almost invisible from the road so should work. For something a bit sturdier( if needed,, depending on the determination of dogs!) how about some plastic latice? That also would depend on how it looked, as far as decorative or tacky from the road. Some dogs are just so fixated on escape that you really have to be ingenious. Our toothless old GSP slid open the sliding door onto our deck, ripped off a balaster on the gate and squeezed through it to get a rabbit?? chipmunk/ because she could? She then tried toget back INTO the fenced yard by chewing on a section of fencing that wouldn't break and was quite furious at us when we did get home.

baysngreys
Jul. 2, 2010, 02:29 PM
We ran hotwire between the ground and the bottom rail on some of our fencing to stop the Corgi from "herding" horses and the other dogs form "visiting" next door.

I measured the shoulder height of said horse chaser and ran a single strand, connected to a solar charger. I make sure to warn people of the wire as it's so low they often don't notice it.

Our HOA dictates what type of fence we can build and it wasn't in the budget to add no-climb wire to the three rail around 18 acres.

kookicat
Jul. 2, 2010, 03:12 PM
You could do the chicken wire and then train a plant to grow on it. Honeysuckle or something like would be nice. :)

crosscreeksh
Jul. 3, 2010, 10:34 PM
Our next farm will be dog proofed on the perimeter!! We have Great Pyrennes (that should explain everything to anyone who knows GP's!!) who thinks he needs to patrol NE Oklahoma!! I know he's just doing the job he was bred to do, but he doesn't understand boundaries...if he can get under "it", it must be okay and still on our land!! We plan to put 3' high American wire/field fence - 6" square holes around any existing boundary fence at our next place. A woman was just telling me th other day about "goat" fence...same as field fence, but with 4" squares. 360 feet runs about $350. Chicken wire is REALLY expensive if you have any amount of footage to cover.