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View Full Version : My dog, vaccinations & de-worming : totally confused.



Lieslot
Jun. 27, 2010, 09:59 AM
I was already confused and after speaking to my vet even more confused.
First Q, dogsy (uhm) will pick the odd horse manure ball & eat it. He gets monthly Heartguard Plus, does he need another de-wormer like Panacur to protect him from parasites he might pickup due to eating horse poop?

Second Q, dogsy was vaccinated for (I think they are vaccines, was listed as follows on his record card)
Bordetella,
Anaplasmosis/Lyme/Erlichia/Heartworm,
DA2LPP
Rabies
Lyme's Disease vaccination
DHLP-Parvo

Does he need any other vaccines to be safe around other dogs and dogboarding?

*Vet was saying he needs to come back in for Kennel Cough vaccination, but isn't Bordetella the same as Kennel Cough? Seems he'd be getting it twice in that case?
*And is the Lyme in the "Anaplasmosis/Lyme/Erlichia/Heartworm"-vaccine, different from Lyme's Disease vaccination or did he get vaccinated for Lyme's twice in that case?
*And if they get Kennel Cough vaccine it's recommended they also get the canine influenza vaccine, correct? :confused:

Boy oh boy, dogs get almost as many vaccines as horses.

Thanking you!

dr j
Jun. 27, 2010, 10:31 AM
I was already confused and after speaking to my vet even more confused.
First Q, dogsy (uhm) will pick the odd horse manure ball & eat it. He gets monthly Heartguard Plus, does he need another de-wormer like Panacur to protect him from parasites he might pickup due to eating horse poop? He doesn't need to dewormed for horse parasites- the routine horse wormies will not infect him, or course the kind that do are out there amongst the horse crap too though. .... the best deworming program for him will be based on his own fecal findings. That said Panacur is an excellent de-wormer for dogs too.

Second Q, dogsy was vaccinated for (I think they are vaccines, was listed as follows on his record card)
Bordetella, THis would be a vaccine for the BACTERIAL cause of kennel cough. Very short acting vax, not super effective
Anaplasmosis/Lyme/Erlichia/Heartworm,This would be a blood test testing for those disease... probably a combo test that runs all at the same time.
DA2LPP vaccine- routine. Used to be annual but that is more variable now.
Rabiesrabies vaccine
Lyme's Disease vaccinationLyme disease vaccine
DHLP-Parvo essentially the same as DA2LPP ( vaccine)

Does he need any other vaccines to be safe around other dogs and dogboarding? You shoule be good for boarding..... but do your Bordatella in the 3 months just prior to boarding.

*Vet was saying he needs to come back in for Kennel Cough vaccination, but isn't Bordetella the same as Kennel Cough? Seems he'd be getting it twice in that case?See above
*And is the Lyme in the "Anaplasmosis/Lyme/Erlichia/Heartworm"-vaccine, different from Lyme's Disease vaccination or did he get vaccinated for Lyme's twice in that case?see above
*And if they get Kennel Cough vaccine it's recommended they also get the canine influenza vaccine, correct? although there is a new canine influenza- not sure many are vaccinating for it/if there is a vax yet even... maybe someone who does routine preventive SA med can answer in more depth. (I don't do small animal much anymore) One of the "P"s in the DHLPP is for parainfluenza which is the common cause of the viral form of canine cough

Lieslot
Jun. 27, 2010, 10:44 AM
Dr J, thank you for the explanation.

Ah, I got it, one was a test, the other a vaccine, makes sense now, I wished they wrote all this down on the veterinary record, would be less guesswork for me :cool:.

Only weird thing would be the DA2LPP, DHLP-Parvo being listed on the same record, perhaps the assistant wrote it down wrong, no big deal.

I will leave him, sounds like he's fine to play with other dogs he may come in contact with and only when we plan to board him will I take him in for an update on the Kennel Cough (+ influenza, seems this vet has a separate one).

He had a negative fecal, I guess he's good then combined with his Heartguard Plus monthly.

Thanks mucho!! :)

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Jun. 27, 2010, 10:55 AM
I would be concerned about the dog ingesting a toxic amount of ivermectin, if you're giving ivermectin directly to the dog monthly and s/he's also eating the feces of horses wormed with ivermectin.

Lieslot
Jun. 27, 2010, 11:01 AM
Thx P_M , I agree, I am extra careful the days immediately following de-worming my horses, those days he's only allowed out with a muzzle with poopguard to be sure (greyhound ;)) or penned up, at other times a year I leave the muzzle off, especially right now in summer, coz he's sneezing in it constantly.
He knows not to eat manure, but yeah, sneaky dog for sure, behind my back he often quickly snatches some anyway.
I find it totally gross, but I've not managed to stop him yet.

Equibrit
Jun. 27, 2010, 12:12 PM
Vets don't seem to be following the recommended protocols, in favour of the almighty $.

UC Davis Dog Vaccination protocol;
http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/clubs/mercer/_attach_/Mercer%20-%20Protocol,%20Canine%20Vaccination.pdf
http://vet.osu.edu/assets/pdf/hospital/vaccinationGuidelines.pdf

Lieslot
Jun. 27, 2010, 03:58 PM
Interesting link Equibrit, especially the 3yr suggestion.

Problem is however, even if vets recommend 3 yrs, a lot of dogboarding places seem to think the more vaccinations the dog has had the safer. I think dogs that go to daycare or boarding are often vaccinated more then those that stay home with petsitters.

I can't comment too much, because I know diddlysquat about dogs & vaccines, all reads like chinese to me, trying to understand it all, so I know what he does & does not need.
My main concern was doubling vaccines within the same year.

citydog
Jun. 27, 2010, 04:06 PM
Boarding kennels around here tend to only be concerned with rabies and bordetella, and as Dr. J said above, bordetella is fairly short-acting. I can't imagine kennels arguing about the others as long as they're within teh 3yr. protocol.

Alagirl
Jun. 27, 2010, 05:01 PM
Been a while since I dealt with dogs :(
But the heart guard should cover almost all worms that can be had. A fecal exam can't hurt though...

As I recall, in past years, conversing with people who show dogs, kennel cough vaccinations are marginally effective, so if you show a lot, or put your dog into a boarding situation they actually do recommend going on a 6 month schedule. but that is info from about 10 years ago, too.

Boarding kennels would not be too interested in that, since by the time the cough appears, the pooch is usually home...

Equibrit
Jun. 27, 2010, 05:22 PM
I do not vaccinate at shorter interval than 3 years, but my vet still expects to ring them up every year. I have to INSIST on the correct protocol and she went to OSU. I'm sure most of her patients get the yearly routine, quite unnecessarily and at great cost.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Jun. 27, 2010, 06:11 PM
My vet actually recommends only vaccinating every 3 years, once the dog is over three years of age.

But that doesn't help me with the boarding kennels, who all require proof of yearly vaccine.:( So I haven't boarded the dogs anywhere in the last couple of years, because I'm not going against veterinary advice.

kdow
Jun. 27, 2010, 06:11 PM
I do not vaccinate at shorter interval than 3 years, but my vet still expects to ring them up every year. I have to INSIST on the correct protocol and she went to OSU. I'm sure most of her patients get the yearly routine, quite unnecessarily and at great cost.

Posts like this make me want to figure out what to slip into our small animal vet's food to make him live FOREVER. (He's been semi-retired for 20+ years.)

He spends a lot of his free time reading up on the latest in the journals, and so he hasn't been pushing yearly vaccinations for quite some time. (Although he has always given rabies as per the state law - I think it took a while for the law to change to be from yearly to every X years.)

Plus, he's outstanding at giving the vaccinations. Last time, I'm not sure the dog even noticed he'd GOTTEN an injection.

(Unfortunately, due to being semi-retired he only does routine stuff like vaccinations, which means when my new rescue needed dental work it took forever to find someone to do it.)

Pancakes
Jun. 27, 2010, 09:54 PM
There are AAHA guidelines for vaccinations, and there are modifications that every veterinarian makes depending on the pet's individual lifestyle.
For instance, Lepto is not a *core* vaccine, but is highly recommended in places where it is known to be a problem.

I'm from NJ and I can state with certainty that Lyme is a HUGE problem. Everyone in my family has gotten Lyme before, and I can guarantee if cats could all of mine would have.
Lyme vaccine is not core. The Lyme vaccine is somewhat controversial in itself; there are pros/cons to vaccinating and not vaccinating. Your vet should have gone over these with you.

Influenza is recommended by many places where dogs come into contact with other dogs frequently, i.e. boarding situations, shows, etc. This is the same with Bordatella (which, as stated before, is much shorter-acting).


At the hospital where I'm starting now, we recommend vaccine titers for everything after initial puppy/kitten shots/boosters in lieu of re-vaccinating, except for Rabies (which is required by law). The Rabies vaccine for cats is also every year instead of every 3 years, since it's a non-adjuvanted vaccine which carries less of a vaccine-related sarcoma risk. It's a very progressive practice, but not every vet has felt comfort in going with titers for every animal annually yet. Some animals have a good titer and don't need it, and some need a booster anyway in addition to the titer, so it ends up costing twice as much.

Hope this answers your questions! Also remember if you don't understand anything at a veterinary appointment, don't hesitate to ask questions! :)

dr j
Jun. 27, 2010, 10:13 PM
At the hospital where I'm starting now, we recommend vaccine titers for everything after initial puppy/kitten shots/boosters in lieu of re-vaccinating, except for Rabies (which is required by law). The Rabies vaccine for cats is also every year instead of every 3 years, since it's a non-adjuvanted vaccine which carries less of a vaccine-related sarcoma risk. It's a very progressive practice, but not every vet has felt comfort in going with titers for every animal annually yet. Some animals have a good titer and don't need it, and some need a booster anyway in addition to the titer, so it ends up costing twice as much.

Hope this answers your questions! Also remember if you don't understand anything at a veterinary appointment, don't hesitate to ask questions! :)

Hey- congrats on graduation!! Welcome to the profession!

And for those of you who think that the vets that still recommend annual vaccines are money hungry, the Ivory tower recommended alternative as Pancakes mentions is annual titers. The cost of which make annual vax look like a Happy meal. Haven't priced it lately but last I was aware it was probably 3 times the cost of the vaccines. May have come down with more demand....but don't think it's ever going to be money-saving proposition.....just better medicine.

Pancakes
Jun. 27, 2010, 11:29 PM
Hey- congrats on graduation!! Welcome to the profession!

And for those of you who think that the vets that still recommend annual vaccines are money hungry, the Ivory tower recommended alternative as Pancakes mentions is annual titers. The cost of which make annual vax look like a Happy meal. Haven't priced it lately but last I was aware it was probably 3 times the cost of the vaccines. May have come down with more demand....but don't think it's ever going to be money-saving proposition.....just better medicine.

Thank you! I am so excited to start. It's so much fun!

I don't know how they have it worked out, but titers at our hospital is VERY reasonable. Like I said, I don't know how they made it that cheap for the client (I will find out!), but many people take the option now. Some just take the vaccine rather than risk doing the titer + vaccine higher cost.

But it's true that not all practices have the option of making it so cheap, maybe, so the "ideal" nowadays may be even more expensive than vaccinating every year to 3 years. Food for thought indeed, when thinking that vets are vaccinating to pad their wallets -- it's simply not true.

kdow
Jun. 27, 2010, 11:49 PM
But it's true that not all practices have the option of making it so cheap, maybe, so the "ideal" nowadays may be even more expensive than vaccinating every year to 3 years. Food for thought indeed, when thinking that vets are vaccinating to pad their wallets -- it's simply not true.

Are there any kind of guidelines for when it's worth it to the dog to titer vs just vaccinate? I'm wondering in particular about my parents' cocker spaniel, who is very healthy for a cocker, but does have some allergies, and seems to be getting allergic to more things as she gets older.

That would suggest to me that in her case, it might make sense to do a titer first so that we're not injecting her if she doesn't need to be, since she seems to have a general overall pattern of increasing sensitivity to Stuff as she ages, and might therefore be more likely to react to something in the vaccination.

Does that make sense? (She's not due anything until 2012 right now, anyway, so it's not a big deal at this point, so I'm just using her as an example. :) )

Pancakes
Jun. 28, 2010, 07:20 AM
Are there any kind of guidelines for when it's worth it to the dog to titer vs just vaccinate? I'm wondering in particular about my parents' cocker spaniel, who is very healthy for a cocker, but does have some allergies, and seems to be getting allergic to more things as she gets older.

That would suggest to me that in her case, it might make sense to do a titer first so that we're not injecting her if she doesn't need to be, since she seems to have a general overall pattern of increasing sensitivity to Stuff as she ages, and might therefore be more likely to react to something in the vaccination.

Does that make sense? (She's not due anything until 2012 right now, anyway, so it's not a big deal at this point, so I'm just using her as an example. :) )


What sorts of sensitivities does she has? But yes, showing increasing reactions to things like allergies, immune-mediated disease, etc., are good indications for performing titers. In general, we would like to perform titers to avoid vaccination if not necessary in those animals that have already undergone an initial vaccine series (puppy/kitten + 1 yr booster). This is to reduce the incidence of vaccine-related sarcoma in cats, and to reduce the possibility of creating problems with dogs (immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, etc). Many cats and dogs have immunity for more than the 3 year-interval, and some actually require immunization more frequently.
Of course, Rabies vaccine should be administered yearly or every 3 years (whichever vaccine is being used), since it is required by law.

Hope this helps!

wendy
Jun. 28, 2010, 08:04 AM
it's people like the OP (not to pick on you personally) who walk into vet's offices uneducated and let the vet do whatever without question and then just pay for it and try to figure it out later. that lets vets continue their insane over-vaccination/ over-treatment procedures. Dogs don't need yearly vaccines nor do they need yearly titers. Once the puppy shots are completed a rabies shot every three years is probably serious overkill. And no, I don't believe for a second that "overvaccination" causes health problems, I just think it's a waste of time and money.
How hard is to print out the current UCDavis protocols and bring them in with you? if you have concerns about something peculiar to your dog's lifestyle, like possibly ingesting worms, why didn't you ask the vet while there?

LauraKY
Jun. 28, 2010, 10:07 AM
it's people like the OP (not to pick on you personally) who walk into vet's offices uneducated and let the vet do whatever without question and then just pay for it and try to figure it out later. that lets vets continue their insane over-vaccination/ over-treatment procedures. Dogs don't need yearly vaccines nor do they need yearly titers. Once the puppy shots are completed a rabies shot every three years is probably serious overkill. And no, I don't believe for a second that "overvaccination" causes health problems, I just think it's a waste of time and money.
How hard is to print out the current UCDavis protocols and bring them in with you? if you have concerns about something peculiar to your dog's lifestyle, like possibly ingesting worms, why didn't you ask the vet while there?

Forget your coffee this morning? That was a bit harsh.

By the way, I've read (and been told my numerous vets) that over vaccination can cause health problems.

Brio
Jun. 28, 2010, 02:15 PM
It also depends on what vaccine they are using. Some vaccines are approved for one-year and others for 3-years or even 4-years. The clinic I'm working at this summer is just transitioning over to a 4-year vaccine. But the lyme & lepto vaccines are still only licensed for 1 year so good records are very important.

Alagirl
Jun. 28, 2010, 03:22 PM
it's people like the OP (not to pick on you personally) who walk into vet's offices uneducated and let the vet do whatever without question and then just pay for it and try to figure it out later. that lets vets continue their insane over-vaccination/ over-treatment procedures. Dogs don't need yearly vaccines nor do they need yearly titers. Once the puppy shots are completed a rabies shot every three years is probably serious overkill. And no, I don't believe for a second that "overvaccination" causes health problems, I just think it's a waste of time and money.
How hard is to print out the current UCDavis protocols and bring them in with you? if you have concerns about something peculiar to your dog's lifestyle, like possibly ingesting worms, why didn't you ask the vet while there?

Is this the moment when somebody exclaims how shampoos are toxic?


4rlz, to print out the latest Davis U vaccinating protocol, one would have to know such animal exists. And I would hope my vet does before I do...

Lieslot
Jun. 28, 2010, 04:07 PM
Thx Pancakes, clear answer :).
My vet did not explain pros or cons of Lyme, she just said in our area it's really worth it, so I took her word on that.

Wendy, you are right, but I am trying to get clued up :).
Basically I got the dog early in the year, a greyhound straight of Florida racetrack and he was supposedly up to date on vaccines, so I gave vet all paperwork and she added some more. I just took him to the vet to register, didn't expect he was going to get vaccinated.
That was back in Jan. Since I dind't think there was a problem, but when I called around for daycare, I got given this "scary talk" from the DayCare managers about needing signed off vet records, dog must not have been in touch with other dogs outside familyhome for at least 2 wks prior to daycare etc etc. I panicked a little and called vet and then it just all got confusing. But now I'm getting there.
I'm a minimalist when it comes to vaccinating my horses and I'm very aware of what needed & when and threading very careful between core vaccines & not overvaccinating. Surely one day I'll be there for dogsy too :D.
It does complicate matters however when boarding places seem to be so demanding. Some places going as far as saying if you didn't use Frontline (but some other flea/tick prevention), not allowed at daycare center.

Also with regards to the 3yr rabies shot, I may very well have to stick with a yearly rabies shot, coz in order to get a dog license in our township, the animal officer requires a yearly copy of proof of vaccination, else no dog license = no dog.

kdow
Jun. 28, 2010, 09:14 PM
What sorts of sensitivities does she has? But yes, showing increasing reactions to things like allergies, immune-mediated disease, etc., are good indications for performing titers.

We think it's basically seasonal - pollen or something. It started out just in the spring for a couple of weeks, but over the years it seems like she's adding allergens, since now it happens during certain times of the summer, also. The primary symptom she gets is itchy skin, but without flakes or anything. Right now we manage it with benedryl and steroid as needed (trying to keep the steroid use to as little as possible) but we have talked about getting her allergy tested.

The problems with that are two things:

1. Are allergy tests actually useful in dogs? I know they can be of questionable usefulness in people.

2. Finding a vet. As I mentioned, our vet for routine things is semi-retired, so he doesn't do stuff like allergy testing. When we were looking for a vet clinic to do dental work on my other dog (rescue who had a broken canine when I adopted him) I was really - less than impressed with the way a lot of vets in the area handled things. I think I'm spoiled by the way our routine vet is so good with dogs that they're HAPPY to go and see him. Though possibly there's a clinic that we didn't try because they don't do much dental stuff that would be good with allergies.

(The problems were largely in how the vets and their techs were interacting with us and the dog. I have a lot of medical people in my family, so I tend to ask questions and not just go by 'because I said so' if something is necessary. I try not to be obnoxious about it, but I think it is my job as dog owner to make sure I understand what's going to happen and why. On top of that, Pirate is prone to getting very anxious when he doesn't understand what's going on, and very few of the vets were willing to give him any time at all to get used to them before they wanted to start poking around. I respect that vets are busy people, but it doesn't really take that long to greet a dog, or to back off for 30 seconds while continuing to ask necessary questions, particularly if you've been told already that he's a recent rescue and has some Issues.) (He is now much better about things, but there was no instant fix.)

Ruth0552
Jun. 28, 2010, 09:29 PM
FYI- sorry in advance if this was already mentioned- was the record handwritten or computer generated? At the office I used to work at sometimes things would go into the computer improperly in an effort to get the charges into the computer properly. We did not keep "medical records" on the computer- just reminders and charges. So your dog may have gotten a distemper vax and then a parvo separately.

Pancakes
Jun. 28, 2010, 10:03 PM
We think it's basically seasonal - pollen or something. It started out just in the spring for a couple of weeks, but over the years it seems like she's adding allergens, since now it happens during certain times of the summer, also. The primary symptom she gets is itchy skin, but without flakes or anything. Right now we manage it with benedryl and steroid as needed (trying to keep the steroid use to as little as possible) but we have talked about getting her allergy tested.

The problems with that are two things:

1. Are allergy tests actually useful in dogs? I know they can be of questionable usefulness in people.

2. Finding a vet. As I mentioned, our vet for routine things is semi-retired, so he doesn't do stuff like allergy testing. When we were looking for a vet clinic to do dental work on my other dog (rescue who had a broken canine when I adopted him) I was really - less than impressed with the way a lot of vets in the area handled things. I think I'm spoiled by the way our routine vet is so good with dogs that they're HAPPY to go and see him. Though possibly there's a clinic that we didn't try because they don't do much dental stuff that would be good with allergies.

(The problems were largely in how the vets and their techs were interacting with us and the dog. I have a lot of medical people in my family, so I tend to ask questions and not just go by 'because I said so' if something is necessary. I try not to be obnoxious about it, but I think it is my job as dog owner to make sure I understand what's going to happen and why. On top of that, Pirate is prone to getting very anxious when he doesn't understand what's going on, and very few of the vets were willing to give him any time at all to get used to them before they wanted to start poking around. I respect that vets are busy people, but it doesn't really take that long to greet a dog, or to back off for 30 seconds while continuing to ask necessary questions, particularly if you've been told already that he's a recent rescue and has some Issues.) (He is now much better about things, but there was no instant fix.)

I agree, it does sound like your current vet is not quite the best fit for you... there are many out there and I encourage you to find one that works better for you. Hospitals that are accredited by AAHA tend to have high standards in many aspects, so finding one that is near you may be a good start.
http://www.healthypet.com/

Allergy tests do have merit in dogs. Without getting into too much information (and the allergy talk/skin talk is a loooong one best left to a vet that has seen your dog and knows his whole history), there are skin allergy tests and blood allergy tests. A boarded dermatologist would be the best person to ask, but many vets do the blood test.

Blume Farm
Jun. 28, 2010, 10:26 PM
I may be reading things wrong as I went through the posts but it sounds like to me the OP's vet most likely did follow the UCD protocol. She gave DHPP, a core vaccine. The OP did not note if it was a 3-year or not, but I suspect it was. The other vaccines added (lyme, lepto, bord) may be necessary for the needs/ environment that the OP lives. The rest were blood parasite tests.

Speaking as a small animal vet I essentially do what is outlined at the UC Davis Protocol. However, in my neck of the woods I do a fair amount of lepto vaccines with outside dogs as we are pretty rural with lots of wildlife, ponds, streams, etc. In 8 years I have seen maybe a dozen mild vaccine reactions. We are considering adding the Lyme vaccine as that is really emerging to be a problem here.

Our boarding facility accepts all three year vaccines. This really should not be an issue and widely accepted.

The main point I want to make though regarding vaccinations is protocols should change, will change as diseases naturally evolve. For example, there are reports here in NC that there may be a NEW strain of parvovirus that is infecting and killing ADULT, well VACCINATED dogs. VERY, VERY scary. If this turns out to be true a new strain of parvovirus will be added to the current DHPP once it is developed. Until the disease and vaccine is better understood I am quite sure it would be recommended as a yearly vaccine. Medicine is not static.

As a final note, most veterinarians are trying to do the best job they know how. We offer care that we feel are most appropriate for the situation based on the knowledge we have at hand. My medical recommendations from the routine to complicated are never based on money generating capabilities (or as one posted stated the almighty $). Owners can always elect what they want done (minus the required rabies vaccine) and should feel comfortable discussing these things with their Dr. I am always quite happy to talk with owners and make alterations to medical plans based on knowledgeable discussions.

kdow
Jun. 28, 2010, 10:41 PM
Allergy tests do have merit in dogs. Without getting into too much information (and the allergy talk/skin talk is a loooong one best left to a vet that has seen your dog and knows his whole history), there are skin allergy tests and blood allergy tests. A boarded dermatologist would be the best person to ask, but many vets do the blood test.

Hmm. I think there's a specialist clinic here that you have to be referred to, and one of their areas is dermatology. I'll look into that. (We looked into them briefly for Pirate's teeth, but decided they were probably overkill when he was pretty much a straight-forward case - he just needed the broken tooth pulled before it got infected and a basic clean up done while they were in there.) I'm pretty sure our current vet will refer us if we ask him to.

(He could probably draw blood for the blood test himself, but since that's not his area of specialty I don't know if he'd really want to get into it when we do have a specialist in the area and can probably afford to take the dog there. He's very much one of those vets happy to deal with a problem if he needs to, but of the opinion that for some stuff, if you can, it's better to just skip right to the specialists and not stress the animal by messing around trying things if it's not necessary.)

Calamber
Jun. 29, 2010, 12:34 AM
I was already confused and after speaking to my vet even more confused.
First Q, dogsy (uhm) will pick the odd horse manure ball & eat it. He gets monthly Heartguard Plus, does he need another de-wormer like Panacur to protect him from parasites he might pickup due to eating horse poop?

Second Q, dogsy was vaccinated for (I think they are vaccines, was listed as follows on his record card)
Bordetella,
Anaplasmosis/Lyme/Erlichia/Heartworm,
DA2LPP
Rabies
Lyme's Disease vaccination
DHLP-Parvo

Does he need any other vaccines to be safe around other dogs and dogboarding?

*Vet was saying he needs to come back in for Kennel Cough vaccination, but isn't Bordetella the same as Kennel Cough? Seems he'd be getting it twice in that case?
*And is the Lyme in the "Anaplasmosis/Lyme/Erlichia/Heartworm"-vaccine, different from Lyme's Disease vaccination or did he get vaccinated for Lyme's twice in that case?
*And if they get Kennel Cough vaccine it's recommended they also get the canine influenza vaccine, correct? :confused:

Boy oh boy, dogs get almost as many vaccines as horses.

Thanking you!

The heartworm, anaplasmosis, ehrlichia, is a test, not a vaccine.

vacation1
Jun. 29, 2010, 01:10 AM
The problems with that are two things: 1. Are allergy tests actually useful in dogs? I know they can be of questionable usefulness in people.
2. Finding a vet.

From what I read/was told a couple years ago, when my dog's allergies got out of hand, the blood testing is considered less useful than the skin testing. And the skin testing is expensive - the quote I got was around $600 - and not very pleasant for the dog. In my case, my dog responded so well to a special allergy diet and medication, we haven't had to do the skin testing. Regular dermatologist visits, food and medicine aren't cheap, but they are cheaper and less stressful than having to haul her to the vet for hot spots every month, and filling her with steroids to calm the itching.

My advice is to find a vet dermatologist, and see whether they think you need to do testing, or can get away with treating symptoms preventatively. Here's a finder from the American College of Veterinary Dermatology.

https://www.acvd.org/