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View Full Version : Why is my neighbor's tractor making me sick?



cyndi
Jun. 23, 2010, 10:44 PM
And I don't mean 'green with envy' sick. I mean green, nauseaous, from the fumes.

I just got a diesel tractor two months ago, and I never notice diesel fumes from mine, and I'm sitting on it.

These are new neighbors who live across the street - nice people who are already loved on our street since they bought the trashy house from the neighbors from hell, gutted it, cleaned it up and probably increased the IQ on our street by quite a bit. ;)

But they've gotten a huge red tractor - can't tell if it is new or old, but it has one of those 'stacks' on it like semis have. And belches black smoke occasionally. But mostly stinks like diesel. This evening I was riding in the farthest corner of our property, at least 1,000 from said tractor. And the fumes were literally making me sick. It is not the first time I've noticed the diesel fumes, but it is the first time I've thought it was going to make me toss my cookies.

If I can smell it so strongly from 1,000 feet away, why can't the guy ON it smell it? And can this possibly be normal? What can be wrong with the tractor?

Twiliath
Jun. 24, 2010, 08:10 AM
It probably needs a tune up and cleaning.

Second, he can't smell because he's sitting on it. That stack is there for a reason.

The diesel smell goes away from the person on the tractor and floats out toward everyone else.

In my house I can smell the bacon (or whatever) burning when I'm upstairs away from the kitchen, but the person cooking it doesn't notice.

msj
Jun. 24, 2010, 08:56 AM
You aren't pregnant by any chance? That would make you toss your cookies over anything.

OK, I'm just joking as it's none of my business (or the boards business) if you are pregnant. :)

cyndi
Jun. 24, 2010, 10:32 AM
You aren't pregnant by any chance? That would make you toss your cookies over anything.

OK, I'm just joking as it's none of my business (or the boards business) if you are pregnant. :)

DEFINITELY not pregnant. And if you KNEW me, you'd know just how funny that notion is..:lol:

Frank B
Jun. 24, 2010, 04:03 PM
Does your state add an odor-causing chemical to "farm" fuel?

TheJenners
Jun. 24, 2010, 04:11 PM
I wonder....does he burn bio-diesel maybe? Or is this a definite diesel-diesel smell?

Bluey
Jun. 24, 2010, 05:17 PM
Stinky black smoke means oil is burning with the fuel.
White smoke means water is burning with the fuel.
You may want to ask your neighbor about this, so he will get his tractor fixed, before it burns/gums up something else, in case he doesn't know how tractors are supposed to run.
High IQ doesn't automatically mean knowledge.;)

cyndi
Jun. 25, 2010, 08:27 AM
Stinky black smoke means oil is burning with the fuel.
White smoke means water is burning with the fuel.
You may want to ask your neighbor about this, so he will get his tractor fixed, before it burns/gums up something else, in case he doesn't know how tractors are supposed to run.
High IQ doesn't automatically mean knowledge.;)

Oh, they are definitely "new to the country" people. It is definitely a strong diesel smell - just like when I go put diesel into containers to take home for "Bevo," my Kubota. They bought property that had an ag exemption - and they tore down all the barbed wire fencing and fenced it with that very pretty white PVC faux board fencing. With no hot wire. And then bought some very sleek, well-fed, expensive-looking cows. I am waiting to see those loose cows on the street. ;)

Frank B
Jun. 25, 2010, 09:00 AM
Uh-oh! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mbk81X6WHA4)

Bluey
Jun. 25, 2010, 09:07 AM
Uh-oh! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mbk81X6WHA4)

:winkgrin:

Some are quick studies and learn in a hurry, before they hurt themselves.:)
Others give up and leave, with "horrid" memories of "that awful place the country is".:(

A friend started wheat harvest two weeks ago with some new helpers and one lasted ONE week.:no:

ReSomething
Jun. 25, 2010, 10:56 AM
Diesel fuel smells different than diesel exhaust, maybe they have a pinhole leak in the fuel system or are just really sloppy when they fuel. Who knows?
I'd just be thankful they are trying to spiff the place up, once the cows get out they'll probably put in a hot wire. Sounds like they have the money just don't know how to spend it to get the best results.

The neighbors back behind me had a falling down fence that they repaired with barb wire, I still called it the cow sieve. Winding barb wire around trees and trying to weave a new fence panel, well, I suppose it could be done but those guys weren't the ones to do it.

How about starting a pool with the neighbors? How long they stay in and where they head to?

JSwan
Jun. 25, 2010, 03:42 PM
Uh-oh! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mbk81X6WHA4)

Holy sh** that's my house. :D

Hey OP - let us know when the cows get out. Take pictures.

kookicat
Jun. 25, 2010, 06:42 PM
Holy sh** that's my house. :D

Hey OP - let us know when the cows get out. Take pictures.

Start a thread (http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=176308). :lol::lol:

wlrottge
Jun. 28, 2010, 04:54 PM
Stinky black smoke means oil is burning with the fuel.
White smoke means water is burning with the fuel.
You may want to ask your neighbor about this, so he will get his tractor fixed, before it burns/gums up something else, in case he doesn't know how tractors are supposed to run.
High IQ doesn't automatically mean knowledge.;)

Black smoke is not always oil. Typically tractors and semi's are setup to make more power than a comprabally sized automotive diesel engine (and have different environmental standards). The addage with the diesel performance people is that you have to make smoke to make power. The smoke comes from an excessivly rich air/fuel ratio, the black smoke is unburned fuel.

What's happening in normal applications is that the turbo is not producing enough boost (i.e. pushing enough air) for all the fuel being injected. Running rich will help the turbo spool, move more air and clear up the exhaust. We've got 30-40 year old JD tractors and newer computer controled ones, they all act the same regarding smoke. Low RPM, if you ask for too much work, you get a puff of black smoke as the engine injects more fuel to make more power just before the turbo spools up.

My 7.3 powerstroke won't smoke at all when it's in stock programming, no matter how hard it's running. If I bump it to any of the programs that add 80 or more horsepower, I start getting smoke under low boost accelerations till I build 8-10psi of boost. I can switch programming at the push of a button and if I wanted could buy a program designed just to make smoke.

Here's an example, watch the smoke at the 50 second mark.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKUACSlIRCU

That's not to say that he doesn't have leaking injectors, o-rings and/or valves, piston rings or a boost leak....