PDA

View Full Version : Anyone Donate to William Woods Univ.?



~DressageJunkie~
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:09 PM
I've heard horror stories of donating to colleges, but has anyone dealt with WWU? I am going to send a video in of my Saddlebred mare, they sound interested but I don't know if they will have a use for her, but figured I would ask here first.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Jun. 23, 2010, 09:09 PM
I'd never heard of them until Rita Mae Brown set her latest novel there.:) But she certainly seems to think very highly of them.

Donkaloosa
Jun. 23, 2010, 09:18 PM
They have a good reputation. I've never heard anyone say anything bad about their programs or how they care for the horses. I do remember years ago (like 20+!) one of their trainers who would show jumpers around the area --- he rode like a sack of potatoes, but the horses did great. In recent years I've seen some of their horses at shows and they always look very, very good --- healthy, beautifully groomed, exactly like you'd expect a top show horse to look.

ASB Stars
Jun. 23, 2010, 09:32 PM
Don't do it. They have several hundred ASBs registered to them, who are no longer there, and I know exactly where many have wound up- at sales, or sold through brokers that they deal with, to the Amish, or worse.

My dear friend was formerly the dressage instructor there, when they were trying to get their University status, and she tells horror stories. She was a witness to how they handle their donated horses.

I personally know where a horse named Callaway's Blizzard- registered to WWU- is. He is skinny as hell, and standing in an Amish barn. I cannot get the guy to be reasonable on price. He wants 10K for a 14 year old horse, who has many, many road miles. :sadsmile: The people who used to own him want him back, but they cannot afford that kind of $$.

Just. Don't. Do. It.

hasahorse
Jun. 23, 2010, 09:34 PM
They are very easy to work with! I think it is a very good idea to send them a video first. I don't know if it is true now, but a couple of years ago, they were only taking horses that would have a specific use for the college (i.e. they would not/will not take a horse that was broken or that need specific/expensive therapies). When the horse is no longer able to be used in the program, they do offer them back to the previous owner for retirement.
If William Woods does not have a place, you may also try Stephens College in Columbia. They also have a nice equine program - fat happy horses, many who get to go home with students for the summer if appropriate facilities are available.

Zu Zu
Jun. 23, 2010, 09:36 PM
Colleges will peddle the donated horses to brokers if the horses do not fit their needs ~ some "hot" horses are sold/traded out due to rider ability - I investigated this years ago with the request that if my ASB gelding did not work out would they please just call and I would take him back --- the answer "NO!" they would just get rid of him ~ I had to just sign him over and they would handle it in their own way. Hope this sheds some light...

Across Sicily
Jun. 23, 2010, 09:36 PM
They are very well kept, watched carefully, and have their own personal attendants in the form of a student keeper (who is in charge of 6-10 horses for an entire semester and usually gets at least 1-2 assistants called pre-keepers to help them out). Stalls are cleaned there twice a day, waterers cleaned daily, horses get supplements, vet, and farrier work on a regular schedule, and they are FASTIDIOUS about grooming and equine cleanliness.

All in all it is about the best a school horse could ever expect to do. However, keep in mind that the horse will be a school horse, ridden 4-6 days a week (long lining, driving, longeing, etc only really occurs if the horse is being "projected" by someone who is showing them) and will wear the big shoes year-round (I don't like that much; I think they should get at least a few mos off from the shoeing.. but jmo). Turnout is verrrrrrry limited around the university as well and I'm not sure the horses in the saddle seat program ever actually got turned out. If those are issues for you, it is best you know. However, the care is definitely top-notch otherwise.

If the horse is not going to the saddle seat program then she will likely get more turnout and the big shoeing thing won't apply either. It can be a rather long year for them though; they rarely get time off, and in the summers students tend to lease horses and bring them home to show.

edited to add: Horses do go in and out of the program at what can be a startlingly fast rate - there are horses who have been there for years and years and years, but those who are deemed 'inappropriate' tend to disappear very quickly. I am not sure where they go, to be honest; I never spent any time looking into it, but since they tend to go within hours or days of it being decided they don't work for the program, I can't imagine they ALL find perfect, loving homes.

Zu Zu
Jun. 23, 2010, 09:38 PM
Don't do it. They have several hundred ASBs registered to them, who are no longer there, and I know exactly where many have wound up- at sales, or sold through brokers that they deal with, to the Amish, or worse.

My dear friend was formerly the dressage instructor there, when they were trying to get their University status, and she tells horror stories. She was a witness to how they handle their donated horses.

I personally know where a horse named Callaway's Blizzard- registered to WWU- is. He is skinny as hell, and standing in an Amish barn. I cannot get the guy to be reasonable on price. He wants 10K for a 14 year old horse, who has many, many road miles. :sadsmile: The people who used to own him want him back, but they cannot afford that kind of $$.

Just. Don't. Do. It.
This is accurate !

fivehorses
Jun. 23, 2010, 10:21 PM
I would put a horse in the ground before I donated to a college, therapy program, etc.
You have to do your homework, and if they can guarrantee the horse be returned to you or to an acceptable approved by you new home, then I won't do it.
I have heard not such good things about WWU donated horses. They might get super care while in work at the school, most horses who are being used do, ie carriage horses, racetrack horses, etc. But, when no longer useful, out like old laundry and no one seems to think that is wrong.
Great modeling for future generations!

~DressageJunkie~
Jun. 23, 2010, 10:39 PM
Thanks, I will not even bother putting together a video for them. My biggest concern is finding her a good home, which is why I have been putting it off for two years, now I am leaving for the college in the fall! Again thanks, I can imagine they care for them great while they are there, but my concern was after.

Zu Zu
Jun. 23, 2010, 10:44 PM
Thanks, I will not even bother putting together a video for them. My biggest concern is finding her a good home, which is why I have been putting it off for two years, now I am leaving for the college in the fall! Again thanks, I can imagine they care for them great while they are there, but my concern was after.

May be able to help you ~ sending pm

mvp
Jun. 24, 2010, 10:48 AM
Thanks, I will not even bother putting together a video for them. My biggest concern is finding her a good home, which is why I have been putting it off for two years, now I am leaving for the college in the fall! Again thanks, I can imagine they care for them great while they are there, but my concern was after.

You need to know that any time you donate a horse to a university it become their property to do with as they see fit. They have bottom lines and planned uses for horses like anything else. They are also big institutions that don't sweat the small stuff like what happens to a horse they no longer want.

You can find better and worse programs, and good people who look out for horses in their care. But the promise is not there, nor implied.

BlueEyedSorrel
Jun. 24, 2010, 11:03 AM
Thanks, I will not even bother putting together a video for them. My biggest concern is finding her a good home, which is why I have been putting it off for two years, now I am leaving for the college in the fall! Again thanks, I can imagine they care for them great while they are there, but my concern was after.

I know of 3 former William Woods lesson horses (H/J, not saddleseat), all 3 were lovely, well trained animals that could have easily fallen through the cracks. One wasn't holding up to the lesson schedule and I believe was slated to go to a broker or auction except one of the students forked over $600 to rescue him (horse was appraised at 35-40K when donated). The other two were sent from William Woods to a broker who sent them to another lesson barn. Both OTTBs, they were branded as being "difficult" and "unreliable." Luckily they were both purchased by a girl who saw past their "attitude" resulting from multiple riders. Great horses for a single, consistent rider who simply fell apart in a lesson situation.

Keep in mind, these horses were the lucky ones. Personally, I would try my very best to find a private buyer (perhaps through your trainer if you have one) or even do a give-away or free lease arrangement before donating.

BES

ASB Stars
Jun. 24, 2010, 12:02 PM
Saddle Seat show horses- which is what is donated from the ASB world, to WWU, are generally worked once per day, when in training as show horses. For the purposes of teaching aspiring show horse trainers, I would imagine that the basic work schedule is the same. The kids in the SS program at WWU also compete those horses in mainstream shows, with one rider, as opposed to simply competing in college tournaments. In that sense, their use would be different than the horses in the H/J program, I would hazard a guess. I could be absolutely wrong- I have nothing to do with the school, or it's programs.