PDA

View Full Version : Manure and Riding Ring



FoxmeadowFarm
Jun. 23, 2010, 01:57 PM
Hi,
I have a new barn and some land to put up a good size riding ring. Cost is a problem though. We have abut 6 inches of loam followed by hardpan(clay). I want to use sand eventually but until I can afford it can I use manure over the clay? I saved up enough to get this far and I am really eager to get started and have a place to ride. My horse is older so we are not heavy workers just need proper excercise. Does anyone have any input on this? Could I just use the clay? I don't want to work hard at building it only to take it apart because it's done wrong. Eventually I would like to use the ring for jumping with my next horse :)

Thanks a bunch!
Lisa

carolprudm
Jun. 23, 2010, 02:17 PM
Manure is a bad idea. It will be dusty when dry and slippery when wet. You are better off riding on the loam

NeedsAdvil
Jun. 23, 2010, 02:42 PM
I used manure as footing before, though ours was a LOT of sawdust and not so much manure. It worked great, we dumped it, spread it as well as we could, then waited a week or so for it to settle before dragging it. There were no issues with slipping or dust, since as I said, it was mainly just sawdust with manure mixed in.

SuperSTB
Jun. 23, 2010, 02:48 PM
You will end up digging up all the clay and loam again.

Manure is organic material- it will decompose ruining the base and sub-base you have already invested in.

SunkenMeadow
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:06 PM
Weird... I drive everyone crazy by making them pick up poop in the ring so that when we drag it doesnt mix in with the footing. I was always of the belief that it was bad

msj
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:11 PM
Weird... I drive everyone crazy by making them pick up poop in the ring so that when we drag it doesnt mix in with the footing. I was always of the belief that it was bad


There's nothing weird about what you're doing at all. It's standard practice at any decent stable I've ever boarded at and I do it with both my indoor, outdoor and sacrifice paddocks.

I boarded at one stable that never picked up the manure in the indoor and when I finished riding and would blow my nose, everything came out black! :eek:

katarine
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:30 PM
Ride on the loam.

Do not add manure- I keep my arena (stone dust) picked daily before the redbirds tear into any droppings and spread them further. Manure will be slick when wet and as it rots it will soften your loam and make a mess of it.

Ask around locally about arenas that you like- ask about materials/river sand/stone dust/etc ...esp since you intend to jump, getting it right even if it takes more time/money, is really important.

FoxmeadowFarm
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:39 PM
Hey Sue, thanks for sharing your sinus habits. I was looking for professional advise not insult.

ayrabz
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:39 PM
Sunkenmeadow....just had to add a :lol: here---
We've always boarded where you always pick up the arena 'after' your rides---just the rules! Always have, always did!
But, I have to admit, there was ONE barn...where we were astonished to find out, we were supposed to:
stop our workout immediately upon each 'poop' and ride to the corner of the arena, while mounted, grab the manure fork out of the mucktub in the corner, ride back, scoop the deposit (before it was ridden back thru at ALL) and then, while mounted, carry it back to the muck tub.:eek:
I. swear. I'm. not. kidding.

guess what? we don't board there anymore.:winkgrin:

Trixie
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:49 PM
Hey Sue, thanks for sharing your sinus habits. I was looking for professional advise not insult.

I fail to understand how that was insulting. It's a valid point - I imagine riding in an indoor full of horse manure probably isn't great to keep inhaling in a closed space.

deltawave
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:53 PM
I wouldn't. I ride in my sandy-loam sacrifice paddock, and the ONLY thing that has kept that very nice surface/footing from turning to muck over time is the assiduous removal of manure EVERY day.

ParadoxFarm
Jun. 23, 2010, 04:02 PM
I tried this last year in a round pen and will strongly advise NOT to do it. The horses slipped every time they cantered if it rained in the last 3 or 4 days. It made my round pen useless. Even in this heat it stays pretty slippery.

sublimequine
Jun. 23, 2010, 04:24 PM
Definitely not. A barn I used to board at had a lovely, mostly sand mixed with some dirt, outdoor arena. It wasn't dragged THAT often, but it was certainly rideable and dried out nicely after torrential downpours.

Then one day I went out there and discovered the BO had dumped a whole bunch of manure and shavings into the arena and dragged it and mixed it in with the sand and dirt. DON'T ask me why they did it, I don't know.

Basically it was pretty much ruined after that. The bugs in there were HORRIBLE, and it took FOREVER to dry out, as the shavings mixed in would just hold onto moisture forever. :no:

Boomer
Jun. 23, 2010, 04:32 PM
I wouldn't do it either. After anyone rides in my arena any poop is removed - helps with bugs and I don't want organic matter / grass & weed seeds mixed into the sand.

The barn I haul to for training also requires pickup after riding.

katarine
Jun. 23, 2010, 04:55 PM
Hey Sue, thanks for sharing your sinus habits. I was looking for professional advise not insult.

Not seeing the insult there, either.

shortbusgeek
Jun. 23, 2010, 05:01 PM
I fail to understand how that was insulting. It's a valid point - I imagine riding in an indoor full of horse manure probably isn't great to keep inhaling in a closed space.

I'm with Trixie. You asked for professional advice and she gave it to you.

CatOnLap
Jun. 24, 2010, 12:54 PM
It was common practice to mix shavings and manure with sand to create footing several decades ago, but these days not so much. Manure dries out and gets dusty and the fine dust gets into everything including your sinuses, but mostly your hair and clothes and I don't like smelling like manure. I can't imagine it's healthy either.

Then there's the slippery when wet factor

And if you are planning to replace it later with more suitable footing, the pain and expense of removing it after its been ground down into your base.

I have used it ( stall cleanings- shavings and manure) to create a riding surface on pasture when there was no riding ring, no money and the grass was even more slippery than shavings. I dumped it about 4-6 inches deep, raked it smooth and started riding in it. It served me well for a summer, and the next spring, the grass just grew back through it= greener than before!

msj
Jun. 24, 2010, 01:36 PM
Hey Sue, thanks for sharing your sinus habits. I was looking for professional advise not insult.

:lol::lol:

Honey, it wasn't meant as an insult at all as others have already told you. You DID ask for professional advice and you got an example of what will happen. If you want to breathe manure, good for you, but please don't subject your horse to it. :no:

BTW, if you want an insult, I can oblige. :D

Bells
Jun. 24, 2010, 04:16 PM
I'd say no too - unless you live in the desert. Manure in outside rings holds down the very fine sand from blowing away in our windstorms. Slippery in the rain? What rain?! I grew up in MA and would agree to no to manure in the ring if you can avoid it.

carolprudm
Jun. 24, 2010, 05:06 PM
It was common practice to mix shavings and manure with sand to create footing several decades ago, but these days not so much. Manure dries out and gets dusty and the fine dust gets into everything including your sinuses, but mostly your hair and clothes and I don't like smelling like manure. I can't imagine it's healthy either.

Then there's the slippery when wet factor

And if you are planning to replace it later with more suitable footing, the pain and expense of removing it after its been ground down into your base.

I have used it ( stall cleanings- shavings and manure) to create a riding surface on pasture when there was no riding ring, no money and the grass was even more slippery than shavings. I dumped it about 4-6 inches deep, raked it smooth and started riding in it. It served me well for a summer, and the next spring, the grass just grew back through it= greener than before!

When I was a kid used bedding was our winter riding surface.

One really did NOT want to fall off

Trees4U
Jun. 26, 2010, 02:47 PM
what if you separated the big poop out and just used the remaining bedding ( shavings or pelleted ). Might that help?

or would that be slippery too.

mzm farm
Jun. 26, 2010, 03:25 PM
I took lessons in a barn of a well respected dressage judge/coach and she used the used bedding along with manure in her indoor arena. I did not care for the smell, the poops froze in winter and were lumpy. Perhaps better management would have made it a better surface - it was soft, but not even - ruts and banks. It was not dusty, but it was winter and indoors. I did not find it slick.

Why would you expect professional advice on a BB? If that is what you want, then you need a professional in the field to evaluate your particular needs and abilities (funds, space, etc) to make a proper suggestion.

Anyhow, that is my one and only experience with that type of footing.