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sonata
Jun. 22, 2010, 12:02 PM
I was just wondering. I have a 2 horse bumper pull and the wood floors are straight from back to front. I have been looking for a newer model and have noticed that some trailers have the floors from front to back and others have them going from side to side. Does anybody have any thoughts on this. Are the side to side floors stronger than the front to back or the other way around

DD_TrailerMan
Jun. 22, 2010, 12:34 PM
Here's my thinking.

For wood floors: cross members should run side to side and floor boards should run front to rear. This is far superior to the alternative of front to rear cross members with side to side boards

For aluminum floors, depends on the design. Sometimes manufacturers will use interlocking planks, running side to side. Because of the shape, those planks function as cross members and floor. Other manfacturers will use Ibeam, running side to side, with floor plate on top, running front to rear. In my opinion, the interlocking planks are a stronger design.


Bartley Heath
bartley@DoubleDTrailers.com
Buy Factory Direct and $ave at DoubleDTrailers.com

weasel1088
Jun. 22, 2010, 04:19 PM
Here's my thinking.

For wood floors: cross members should run side to side and floor boards should run front to rear. This is far superior to the alternative of front to rear cross members with side to side boards

For aluminum floors, depends on the design. Sometimes manufacturers will use interlocking planks, running side to side. Because of the shape, those planks function as cross members and floor. Other manfacturers will use Ibeam, running side to side, with floor plate on top, running front to rear. In my opinion, the interlocking planks are a stronger design.


Bartley Heath
bartley@DoubleDTrailers.com
Buy Factory Direct and $ave at DoubleDTrailers.com




Why?

The shorter the wood board, the stronger it will be.

wildlifer
Jun. 22, 2010, 04:30 PM
My guess would be because the horse's weight is distributed longitudinally, so you need your support members, the cross beams, perpendicular to that to support the weight.

2bee
Jun. 22, 2010, 05:10 PM
Why?

The shorter the wood board, the stronger it will be.

The distance between the cross members dictates how "short" the board is, no matter which way the board is oriented in the trailer.

2bee
Jun. 22, 2010, 05:30 PM
Personally I wouldn't have a trailer with floor boards running side to side, ever see an equipment trailer or semi trailer like that?

If the cross members are the same distance apart on both trailers I suspect there is no huge difference in "strength" in this situation. Although....

One thought that always stuck in my head about a straight load with floor boards side to side; you'll have the horse's feet on the same board with the cross member in the middle, just like you would break a stick over your knee.

grinanride
Jun. 23, 2010, 06:08 AM
2bee wrote "One thought that always stuck in my head about a straight load with floor boards side to side; you'll have the horse's feet on the same board "

Thats the idea, in a straight load with 2 horses there would be 4 legs on the same board.
Risa
HappyTrailsTrailers
BalancedRideTrailers

2bee
Jun. 23, 2010, 07:43 AM
2bee wrote "One thought that always stuck in my head about a straight load with floor boards side to side; you'll have the horse's feet on the same board "

Thats the idea, in a straight load with 2 horses there would be 4 legs on the same board.
Risa
HappyTrailsTrailers
BalancedRideTrailers

:confused: Not sure I follow, with over 10 individual boards for the horses to stand on the 'idea' is to only use 2? If that's the idea it's a bad one. Common sense should indicate spreading the load would be the best choice.

Bluey
Jun. 23, 2010, 08:12 AM
Every trailer I have seen, horse or equipment or plain light trailer, has cross members horizontally, supporting whatever material on top, boards, rumber, metal, whatever.

There are specifications on how far apart those cross supports have to be, some 18" or whatever, depending on how the trailer will rate.
You can see all these trailers, the top material runs the lenght of the trailer where possible, it is part of good engineering for trailer floors:

http://www.kaufmantrailers.com/

I would say you would need much stronger material, that means much heavier trailer in the end, to have large enough cross, supporting members set lenghtwise.

You can use more, smaller ones when the distance is considerably shorter.

grinanride
Jun. 24, 2010, 06:23 AM
That is the ( bad ) idea and the reason for running the floor boards front to back - if the boards are side to side on a straight load then 1 board side to side would support all front feet and one side to side at the rear would support all rear feet - so, purchase a trailer with boards front to back
Risa
happytrailstrailers
balancedridetrailers


:confused: Not sure I follow, with over 10 individual boards for the horses to stand on the 'idea' is to only use 2? If that's the idea it's a bad one. Common sense should indicate spreading the load would be the best choice.

sonata
Jun. 24, 2010, 07:12 AM
Thanks everybody. My trailer has the boards running front to back and most trailers that I have seen are the same way. I just happened to run across one that had the boards going left to right. I'm guessing on the one that has the boards going left to right that the support beams under them are running the length of the trailer instead of across