PDA

View Full Version : "Mucking stalls ruins chidren's riding and self esteem"...an actual quote



FlightCheck
Jun. 22, 2010, 10:19 AM
Now, if this turns into bashing a particular discipline, I will ask the mods to shut it down.

This past weekend I announced a dressage show, and brought the DrunkenBabyGiraffe's owners along with the child's pony, just for schooling purposes. They have never been to a recognized dressage competition.

The DrunkenBabyGiraffe attracted a lot of attention whilst out handwalking or in her stall, along with the usual offers to
*train her to her full potential*
*have her going First Level by Fall*
*breed her*
*buy her*
*train the 11yr old to Young Riders*
etc, etc, etc - all normal for a new fish in the pond.

BUT, the Funniest Comment:

Mom is supervising child cleaning stall. Woman approaches mom and child, and hands over business card. Normal converstion ensues ("lovely horse, pony, child, day, etc.). And then:

"But you know, your child CANNOT reach her FULL POTENTIAL mucking stalls. Children should spend their time RIDING and learning new skills, not grooming or cleaning stalls. Here's my card - I'll come to your barn, pick up your truck, trailer, horse, pony, load the trailer, bring your child to the show, unpack, etc...and you can fly in to see her rather than waste y'all's time with chores".

I wonder how much business this woman has?

irkenequine
Jun. 22, 2010, 10:28 AM
This nearly made my eyes bug out of my head. I was a 'barn rat' who LIVED under the feet of her trainers at shows (and still do, although now for money.) I learned...literally everything from those moments of packing and braiding, tacking and warming up...what the new trends were (especially with braiding, learned the dressage 'button braids' from a competitor stalled next door who taught me at 11 pm). I am almost appalled that there is a market for something like this, although not surprised.

I understand what a luxury it might be to have someone else break icy water buckets at home in the AM, or have your horse on stall board and a worker cleans your stall. Thats a little bit different (although I still come from the old fashioned philosophy that a child shouldn't be allowed the responsibility to own a horse until they understand that horse is still living, breathing, and in need of attention-while you're at home sleeping, playing your xbox, watching tv, etc.) But if you can't respect your animal enough to personally see after his care, when you've toted him off to a show for your benefit...how much respect can you really show him under saddle. Its not just a fluke that professional riders SO respect the opinions of their grooms and stablehands. That is valuable, personal time you spend with that animal...to me, its one of my most treasured times with horses and makes it all worth while.

----

ALTHOUGH, just to be devil's advocate, i've edited to add:

There WERE times that mucking stalls did kill my self esteem--when I mucked 30 stalls after school at a hunter barn I couldn't have DREAMED to afford. Many of the stalls I mucked? Were the horses of classmates....and I DID go home crying some days as I wheeled around a muck bucket while they sat on 70k horses watching. However, when I was finally able to buy my own horse...care for it on my own, pay for its amenities...there was no sweeter moment in the world. (Plus, taught me to treat the staff like gold--they have your horse's life in their hands!)

LisaB
Jun. 22, 2010, 10:31 AM
Well damned if that kid isn't going to use that excuse for the next 10 years! But MOOOOMMMMM, it's ruining my riding!
There was a recent entry in the Chronicle about a dressage woman in Germany. I think she's a w-s? Anyway, they have to sweep by hand the entire barn aisle. She said it builds up the stomach muscles.

LAZ
Jun. 22, 2010, 10:45 AM
I guess that would explain my problems as an adult. :lol: I mucked a lot of stalls for the honor of riding a school horse as a kid.

KitKat987
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:02 AM
:rolleyes: Good grief. That is the stupidest sales pitch I have EVER heard. I personally love mucking stalls. It's my quiet time. I crank the radio and sing along, providing no one is within earshot. I only have two stalls to do, but I don't remember hating it when I worked in barns and did 30 + a day.

I would think that learning about all of the work that goes into having a horse would make the child appreciate their hobby that much more, would help keep them in shape and give them a sense of accomplishment, all things that would be GOOD for them.

fooler
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:13 AM
Another thread asks about cracks in the foundation - this attitude is one reason for those cracks.

I remember a short TV session about Princess Anne before the 1976 Olympics. It was emphasized that she and her then husband, Capt. Mark Phillips, did the majority of their own horse care, including mucking of stalls.

justdandy
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:20 AM
:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol: :lol::lol:Sorry...can't comment....laughing too hard.:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:....can't.....b reathe.....:lol::lol::lol::lol:

Kcisawesome
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:22 AM
But I like cleaning stalls! It's one of my top 3 Favorite chores, along with sweeping and poulticing. I wonder what my trainer (I'm in a working student position) would say if I told her that stall cleaning was detrimental to my riding? Hahahaha!

Zu Zu
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:26 AM
:lol::lol: WHAT Blog Smog ~~~ :lol: I say "hand that woman a pitchfork and head her towards a stall ! :lol: She needs "LONG-TERM STALL MUCKING THERAPY" !! IMHO !

Zu Zu
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:29 AM
Soft hijack - justdandy ~ I love your signature !

magnolia73
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:34 AM
LOL, it's a pretty good marketing ploy.

graytbmare
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:37 AM
wow.. no words other than just absolutely hysterical.... But Im dying to know, what did the parents say???!!

Ghazzu
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:41 AM
There's no shortage of stupidity out there.
A friend who was teaching a riding class in an equine studies program had a student whine to her, "I don't see what grooming has to do with *riding*..."

Fortunately, the friend is far more diplomatic than I, and a discussion ensued.

leilatigress
Jun. 22, 2010, 12:45 PM
So glad the DD does not read this board. :P She LOVES to muck out the stalls which can be interesting considering she is all of 3 ft tall trying to wield a 5 ft tall manure scoop into the handy radio flyer. If I told her she couldn't muck out the pony's stall after her ride I think she might have a fit at the pony standing in poop. :lol:

RAyers
Jun. 22, 2010, 12:49 PM
Is there some method to do a remote psychic bitch slap?

Reed

Catalina
Jun. 22, 2010, 12:52 PM
I'm glad I finally know what my problem is- I'm scarred for life from all those stalls I mucked as a kid :lol:.

FlightCheck
Jun. 22, 2010, 12:54 PM
Mom and child thought it was hysterically funny (although the child thought the woman was a bit scary).

I'm going to grab that business card from them tomorrow and see whose name is on it!!

KBG Eventer
Jun. 22, 2010, 01:02 PM
When I was around that age and at barn camp we had to clean our horse's stall, clean their buckets, feed, etc. before we could eat breakfast. I had two ponies a couple of summers and was pathetic at cleaning stalls. It could take me HOURS sometimes to clean two stalls. I was very hungry sometimes. :lol:

RAyers
Jun. 22, 2010, 01:15 PM
FlightCheck, PLEASE let this woman know I was required to clean and bed 40 stalls each day on the weekends to pay for my lessons when I was a kid. Given that you know me, let know how I can SO identify with what she is saying. Then slap her.

Reed

P.S. Maybe she has some weird manure fetish?

deltawave
Jun. 22, 2010, 01:22 PM
Well, she has a business plan and a target client group and by golly she's sticking to it. :lol:

riderboy
Jun. 22, 2010, 01:22 PM
Mucking stalls allows me to enjoy clarity of purpose. And at least I know when I've stepped in the sh*t. At work, I don't know that sometimes until I'm knee deep in it.

denny
Jun. 22, 2010, 01:28 PM
How come that woman wasn`t MY mother? Damn!

flutie1
Jun. 22, 2010, 01:29 PM
Many people would give you a Nobel prize because you have rendered me speechless!
:-)

Carolinadreamin'
Jun. 22, 2010, 01:49 PM
Well, if your child goes to one of those barns where the horse is tacked up and waiting, the child may learn to ride, but will never learn about horses or become a great horsewoman (or man). We muck stalls, help feed, fix fence lines, help with the arena and xcountry jumps, scrub water troughs, etc. The way the kids look at it, it allows them more time to spend at the barn, so they love it. It helps me avoid a gym, so works for me.

ambar
Jun. 22, 2010, 01:56 PM
Some people exist just to give the rest of us something to point at and laugh, yanno?

Big Spender
Jun. 22, 2010, 02:25 PM
I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be where I am today if I didn't have that evil little shetland pony when I was 4 years old. He lived in the garage and was tethered in the front yard. :lol: I don't remember what we did with the manure and bedding (straw because I lived in PA), but I'm pretty sure I used a snow shovel to clean his stall. I also remember him walking through the house (the laundry room was the room attached to the garage) so that we could ride in our enclosed back yard. Today I am up at 4:30 in the morning to do stalls so that I can go to the gym, go to work and ride when I get home. I love the quiet time first thing in the morning.

SevenDogs
Jun. 22, 2010, 02:37 PM
Can we have house cleaning and laundry added to this list? :lol:

eventer_mi
Jun. 22, 2010, 02:38 PM
Are you kidding? I would have KILLED to muck stalls when I was a kid. Parents didn't believe that having a horse was in my best interest (playing tennis and musical instruments was, apparently) and the only time I got to be near a horse until I was an adult was at the local hack when we went on a family vacation. I would have begged, borrowed, stole anything just to be around horses, even if that meant mucking stalls.

Guess that's why I've never achieved my full potential, eh? I wanted to muck stalls!

n2dressage
Jun. 22, 2010, 03:07 PM
Some people exist just to give the rest of us something to point at and laugh, yanno?

:lol: :lol: :lol:

I personally hate cleaning stalls but that's because I cleaned waaaay too many as a kid but I'm sure fast at cleaning now! It's like ripping off a bandaid... The faster the less painful! I'm pretty sure I would be a much different person w/o those experiences... And that person would probably be an impossible spoiled brat!!

Thomas_1
Jun. 22, 2010, 03:11 PM
"But you know, your child CANNOT reach her FULL POTENTIAL mucking stalls. Children should spend their time RIDING and learning new skills, not grooming or cleaning stalls. Here's my card - I'll come to your barn, pick up your truck, trailer, horse, pony, load the trailer, bring your child to the show, unpack, etc...and you can fly in to see her rather than waste y'all's time with chores".

I wonder how much business this woman has?

Potentially quite a lot from stinking rich women who haven't really got a lot of interest in bringing up their children to develop a work ethic and to appreciate all things come with a price and through hard work.

hey101
Jun. 22, 2010, 03:52 PM
I LOVE mucking stalls. Although I've been boarding for the last three years, I still miss caring for my own horses every single day.

My 18-mo old daughter just had her first pony ride last weekend. HUGE smiles and laughs the entire time. Whenever she sees a picture of a horse she jumps up and down and points at it. Things are looking great that I'll have a horsey daughter!

BUT.

Before she even dreams about having a pony of her own (in about 8 years), she is going to have to PROOVE to me that she's earned it way way before then, and for a long period of time. By mucking stalls. Cleaning tack. Grooming ponies. Showing up for lessons early and staying late to ask those millions of questions. GEtting dirty and really showing me that she WANTS that pony. And then maybe we'll start out by leasing one.... you know, just to make sure she really realizes what a committment it is to be responsible for another living being.

Am I already planning my child's eventual ruination? :lol:

2bayboys
Jun. 22, 2010, 04:22 PM
So I came randomly wandering over here from hunter/jumper land and found this thread about a deluded trainer's marketing strategy and a post that included "remote psychic bitch slap". DAM, you guys are all right! :lol:

From personal experience, cleaning stalls is a great workout for abs and arms, and those items are rather useful when riding.

tbgurl
Jun. 22, 2010, 04:37 PM
Seriously? I cleaned stalls by CHOICE when I was a kid. I didn't even HAVE to because stall cleaning was included in board, but when I got done riding and still wanted to be at the barn, near my horse, I cleaned his stall just because.

While it's not my favorite activity today, I still enjoy the satisfaction of doing the hard work to get a nice clean stall. I'd rather clean stalls than my house. :)

yellowbritches
Jun. 22, 2010, 04:49 PM
I actually hate mucking stalls but I do it because that's just what you do when you have horses.

I did muck A LOT of stalls when I was 12 or so...I did it for almost nothing (my mom actually took me out of that barn when she realized I was basically slave/child labor and the BM SCREAMED at me and the other 12 yr. old I worked with when the BO's horse got scraped up in the field....we were left ALONE with 26 horses to care for and stalls to clean...yeah. Great). All that being said, I think you gotta learn that stuff. It's important. There's more to this business, even if you have ZERO intention of actually being anything other than an ammy, than RIDING. And learning all that stuff makes the riding A) more rewarding and B) make more sense (if my horse looks/feels like crap on the ground, he will go/feel like crap when I'm on him).

AppendixQHLover
Jun. 22, 2010, 04:57 PM
Mucking stalls unlike the paying job is instant gratification. It takes me weeks to get a result at my job. Cleaning stalls...shovel some poop..clean.

I lost count of the amount of stalls that I did as a kid. I wanted an additional lesson..great clean stalls.

Lori T
Jun. 22, 2010, 05:02 PM
So how does that explain all the graduate pony clubbers who went on to be Olympians?
Honestly, I keep telling my husband that I would gladly quit my job and muck 20 stalls instead of the bs I deal with at work! He doesn't understand why I enjoy heading to my barn after work and mucking my 6 every day..it is a great way to relax and unwind!

PRS
Jun. 22, 2010, 05:04 PM
:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol: :lol::lol:Sorry...can't comment....laughing too hard.:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:....can't.....b reathe.....:lol::lol::lol::lol:

:lol: Me too! Stupidest thing I ever heard. Hard work and the satisfaction it brings builds self esteem with added bonus that you get bragging rights later in life about how haaaarrrrddd you had to work just to ride a pony for an hour.

justdandy
Jun. 22, 2010, 05:11 PM
I'm not a child, but I'm going to use this "line" on my husband to see if I can get full-time barn help.:winkgrin: I'll let y'all know how that goes.:lol::lol::lol::lol:

DLee
Jun. 22, 2010, 05:19 PM
No wonder I never made it farther in my riding career. :(

GiGi
Jun. 22, 2010, 05:22 PM
roflmao

WNT
Jun. 22, 2010, 05:28 PM
No wonder I never made it farther in my riding career. :(

Yeah, right?

RAyers
Jun. 22, 2010, 05:46 PM
How come that woman wasn`t MY mother? Damn!

Because, Denny, if she was, you would be celebrating your 50th anniversary at Novice (with your new morgan, Budreau) and toasting 35 years as a CPA for Lummley and Associates and we would all be going, "Damn, that Denny is a GOD with amortization of capital assets."

Reed

kinnip
Jun. 22, 2010, 06:05 PM
{slack jawed silence}

walktrot
Jun. 22, 2010, 06:50 PM
I haven't read the whole thread, but I"m in the camp with those who enjoy picking stalls, and think that kids should have to learn how much work it is to enjoy a horse.

Several years ago on some reality tv show, there were a handful of city slickers who went off to a real ranch to see who could turn into the best cowhand. One of the contestants was a polo player from Beverly Hills, or some similar locale.

The first morning they took them out to their horses and said "okay, tack 'em up." Polo Player stands there looking at the saddle. Ranch hand says put the saddle on the horse. Polo Player says "I don't know how to do that. We have grooms."

WNT
Jun. 22, 2010, 07:02 PM
Because, Denny, if she was, you would be celebrating your 50th anniversary at Novice (with your new morgan, Budreau) and toasting 35 years as a CPA for Lummley and Associates and we would all be going, "Damn, that Denny is a GOD with amortization of capital assets."

Reed

This is a total ROFLPIMP moment. Excuse me while I clean up...

Gryhrs
Jun. 22, 2010, 07:43 PM
Whatever. I'll endure ridicule, tolerate public shunning and even risk becoming a CPA (amortization is really an undervalued skill).......

It's 101 outside.....could I PLEASE get her card?!?

Carol Ames
Jun. 22, 2010, 07:52 PM
I have heard/ read a statement by a BNT or parent of a big eq kid that students should spend their time watching the ring this was h/j ; how the course rides; focusing on their own ride/ plan; rather than doing stalls'/ developing calluses. wearing work clothing I found it an interesting way to justify charging clients mega$$$$$$ for show services

fillygreen
Jun. 22, 2010, 08:02 PM
Wow. Just wow. :no: And we wonder why kids lack any sort of responsibility today. I teach and fight this crap ALL day long. I show up to school so I should get an A. Just because I show up. :confused:

While cleaning stalls does all of the above stated, it also teaches you about the health of your horse. You learn to watch how much manure, type/hardness, etc can affect the health of the horse. How too much urine or not enough, etc. can provide clues to the horses health, especially when working at a big stables.

Sacred_Petra
Jun. 22, 2010, 08:05 PM
Lol! I would have paid to muck stalls as a kid, especially if it meant having less time to clean my room. I'll admit, I went through a period last semester where I hated mucking stalls, but now I'm to the point where I like mucking stalls. Its my alone time, my horse gets to come over and help (and groom me), and there is nothing like a freshly cleaned stall with a happy horse in it.

walktrot, I would kill to see that show. It sounds hilarious.

JoZ
Jun. 22, 2010, 08:14 PM
Mucking stalls allows me to enjoy clarity of purpose. And at least I know when I've stepped in the sh*t. At work, I don't know that sometimes until I'm knee deep in it.

If you don't mind, I'm going to hang this quote in my cubicle... :yes::lol:

cajunbelle
Jun. 22, 2010, 08:38 PM
The only way to appreciate a horse with a great turnout at a show.... Is to know 1st hand, what it took to get them there!:D

kdow
Jun. 22, 2010, 08:54 PM
Well, if your child goes to one of those barns where the horse is tacked up and waiting, the child may learn to ride, but will never learn about horses or become a great horsewoman (or man). We muck stalls, help feed, fix fence lines, help with the arena and xcountry jumps, scrub water troughs, etc. The way the kids look at it, it allows them more time to spend at the barn, so they love it. It helps me avoid a gym, so works for me.

I had one lesson at a place like that (instead of my normal place, where you tacked up, washed after if necessary, checked on water, and if you were a working student you cleaned stalls and raked the arena and all that fun stuff) and it weirded me right out. Even just the process of tacking up is a chance to get to know the horse and say hello.

Ritazza
Jun. 22, 2010, 09:40 PM
We've got a kid like that at our barn. Everytime she walks in I just want to strangle her! Thankfully her pony bucks her off pretty much every time she gets on so we haven't seen her for two months. Last I heard her mother couldn't get her to come to lessons because "she was dancing last night so her feet hurt and she doesn't want to put her boots on."

Now THERE'S a kid who is going far in her riding career!!!!!

frugalannie
Jun. 22, 2010, 10:02 PM
Is there some method to do a remote psychic bitch slap?

Reed

Reed, just saw this. It might have to become my sig line. Do I have your permission?

And the concept of Denny with a green eyeshade, sittin' in the office, starin' at the computer all day...

How does one get wine off one's computer?

shea'smom
Jun. 22, 2010, 10:33 PM
Reed..... :cool:

kkindley
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:06 PM
wow! Now can I alter this a little bit to apply it to housework? I can never reash my full potential as a woman if I have to clean my house!! I'd MUCH rather be mucking stalls or sweeping the aisle than sweeping my floors! As a kid we mucked stalls, esp in the summer cause we were there all day! I didn't even get free lessons or anything for it. We did it cause it was being at the barn and being helpful. Now granted, those of that did help out, my barn owner/instructor would give us pointers when we were just schooling. But that was mainly because she cared about us.

Mara
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:18 PM
wow! Now can I alter this a little bit to apply it to housework? I can never reash my full potential as a woman if I have to clean my house!! I'd MUCH rather be mucking stalls or sweeping the aisle than sweeping my floors! As a kid we mucked stalls, esp in the summer cause we were there all day! I didn't even get free lessons or anything for it. We did it cause it was being at the barn and being helpful. Now granted, those of that did help out, my barn owner/instructor would give us pointers when we were just schooling. But that was mainly because she cared about us.

Same here. Our trainer/BO's philosophy was, if we were there all day, we were damn well going to make ourselves useful and learn something. And we were climbing all over each other to comply with her wishes.
It baffled my mom, though, that I'd beg to go spend the day at the barn digging out stalls in 90+ degree heat, but balked at cleaning my room.

Golden Pony
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:49 PM
Oh NO! I better stop making my 12 yr. old DD stop mucking stalls NOW! She'll never pass her Pony Club D-3 rating....

Hilary
Jun. 23, 2010, 01:11 AM
Well she's partly right - you cannot learn to RIDE while cleaning a stall. You can learn about hard work, the health of your horse, and sort out all the crap you need to sort out while mucking stalls, but to learn to ride and improve your riding you need to RIDE. (perfect practice makes perfect)

The rest of it? Well, I fully agree that this woman is full of more sh*t than our collective wheelbarrows.

BBowen
Jun. 23, 2010, 02:40 AM
Many people would give you a Nobel prize because you have rendered me speechless!
:-)


ROTFLMAO. I almost wet my pants laughing so hard on this one.

I thought Reed's "psychic bitch slap" was great, but I think this one beat him.

ZiggyStardust
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:02 AM
Because, Denny, if she was, you would be celebrating your 50th anniversary at Novice (with your new morgan, Budreau) and toasting 35 years as a CPA for Lummley and Associates and we would all be going, "Damn, that Denny is a GOD with amortization of capital assets."

Reed

Even some CPAs actually had to clean stalls when they were kids ;)

And they could do more pull ups than any other girl in class...

JER
Jun. 23, 2010, 04:00 AM
This all sounds so, um, Freudian.

redears
Jun. 23, 2010, 04:11 AM
I love cleaning stalls. I used to clean on the weekends at a large boarding barn I was at and usually had a specific barn. I knew the horses well and I had the mare's barns, and would imagine the specific mare coming into her clean stall and eating her nice big pile of hay and sipping out of her clean water buckets. It was so gratifying.

My mind would be doing "Goldie is 32 years old so she gets extra shavings to rest her sore legs in, Kenya likes to roll when she gets in so I'll put everything in the middle for her to roll in.." etc.

I board my horses now on full care and will clean their stalls in the evening after my ride, even though they usually only have a pile or so in it, I just like leaving knowing they have a clean bed to sleep in.

Cody
Jun. 23, 2010, 07:48 AM
Mom and child thought it was hysterically funny (although the child thought the woman was a bit scary).

I'm going to grab that business card from them tomorrow and see whose name is on it!!

Yep do that, cos' I want to know as well. I figured the DBG's mom would get a chuckle out of that.

Lori T
Jun. 23, 2010, 11:08 AM
You know, the sad truth is, this attitude from professionals, whether it be dressage, or in my area, the hunter/jumper group, is why I am having a hard time recruiting pony clubbers. The professionals see pony club as a threat to their income...we teach the kids to be horsemen and self-sufficient...they can muck, they can braid, they can trailer, and >gasp<, they can groom their own horse....all things that the big barns charge for. If the little darlings learn to do these on their own, they figure they are going to lose money. It is really sad and I wonder about the horse world in the next generation...when these trainers retire, is there anyone around who will know how to properly care for their horses?

monstrpony
Jun. 23, 2010, 11:22 AM
I think I know someone who rode with this woman! That would be one of my college equestrian club members, the one who singlehandedly put the kabosh on a very profitable fundraising activity--delivering & unloading "barn litter" to local gardeners (I even did the loading with my tractor)--when she declared that club members "shouldn't be forced to do manual labor for fundraisers."

katie+tru
Jun. 23, 2010, 11:34 AM
Eesh. It's practically an unspoken rule at my barn that all kids do work. Even if you're paying for lessons you are still expected to contribute somehow. My trainer was telling me the other day that one of the boys who really despises cleaning stalls has now been assigned to cleaning the tack room instead. Seriously, IMO, the tack room is worse than most stalls in the barn. But whatever, his choice. He has to help somewhere. As for the kids who are literally too small to wrangle a pitchfork or push a full wheelbarrow, they get other jobs. The other boy is our official Sawdust Unloader. He does a most excellent job. lol

Fred
Jun. 23, 2010, 02:52 PM
Mucking stalls allows me to enjoy clarity of purpose. And at least I know when I've stepped in the sh*t. At work, I don't know that sometimes until I'm knee deep in it.

perfectly said, riderboy.

Mucking also helps me to practice singing along to the radio, and there is no one around to laugh and further lessen my self-esteem.
;)

still laughing at the remote psychic bitchslap Reed.
You could market that for sure.

Toadie's mom
Jun. 23, 2010, 02:58 PM
Where's the "pouty lips" icon? I need that to go along with my wine, oops I mean whine.

RAyers
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:08 PM
Even some CPAs actually had to clean stalls when they were kids ;)...



But did it make you a better CPA or detract from your time as a CPA, limiting your advancement in the field?


Reed

Medicine Wheel (Ogilvie)
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:17 PM
The unfortunate thing is this attitude is becoming pervasive in schools and colleges as well. Do you think you can get a student to think critically, experience broadly, and learn independent thinking when the other teachers are spoon feeding? Students themselves rally against basic foundations being taught, and in lower levels, their parents back them.....
MW

monstrpony
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:33 PM
The unfortunate thing is this attitude is becoming pervasive in schools and colleges as well. Do you think you can get a student to think critically, experience broadly, and learn independent thinking when the other teachers are spoon feeding? Students themselves rally against basic foundations being taught, and in lower levels, their parents back them.....
MW

Oh, please ... let's not go there.

Am in total agreement; had a college student farm-sit for me yesterday. Was going to leave the horses in the dry lot (& barn), for simplicity for her, but decided with the heat wave that they needed access to the pasture (i.e., open gate between dry lot and pasture) to make sure they moved around. Left detailed instructions, including the inconvenience of having to put the donkey's grazing muzzles on for turnout in the pasture. Came home to find out that the horses spent the day in the pasture with the gate to the dry lot & barn closed (heat wave, little shade, no fans, and no access to water) while the donkeys spent the day in the dry lot with their muzzles on.

Let me know if you find any logic in that, never mind evidence of critical thinking. :rolleyes:

blazing saddles
Jun. 23, 2010, 03:38 PM
Where was this lady when I was growing up? I hated mucking stalls!

mademoiselle
Jun. 23, 2010, 04:19 PM
If that theory is true, thank god I mucked so many stalls when I was younger.
I can't imagine what my self esteem would be by now if it was bigger :eek::eek::eek:.

oh wait, I think I know who I would ended up like : French, short, too much self esteem ... Napoleon :winkgrin:

That was a close call for me ... :lol::lol::lol:

Flightcheck, you are killing me, I so want to know who it is now!!!:yes:

ZiggyStardust
Jun. 23, 2010, 05:48 PM
But did it make you a better CPA or detract from your time as a CPA, limiting your advancement in the field?


Reed

Oh the former, definitely. Already knowing how to shovel s*** when one embarks on a "professional" career is always a handy skill, especially when one does not have a trust fund.

Also, being able to do various matter of fact or ballsy horsey things enables that little voice in the back of one's head that just mutters "sissy" instead of "thank you sir, may I have another" whenever there is a certain lack of perspective in the conference room...

SPF10
Jun. 23, 2010, 05:54 PM
Luckily our instructor had my DD grooming on the first lesson and is very big into horse care so there is hope for the next generation.

Love to muck! Like others it is either my quite time or time bonding with DD and hearing the drama of the day, great moments and all shared over horse poop, who'd a thunk it!

Carol Ames
Jun. 23, 2010, 05:58 PM
OTOHI can tell you that appearing in work clothes, boots, work gloves and picking up a pitchfork, and then actually :eek:mucking can lower one in the eyes of an employer:mad:; ask me :ohow I know:sadsmile:

showhorsegallery
Jun. 23, 2010, 06:05 PM
Stalls I never minded. I just hate doing water buckets.

Working at the barn was WORK, and I did it in exchange for cheaper lessons or free riding time.

I think more people would appreciate what they have if they had to work hard as children/young adults. Nothing wrong with character building work. If anything it builds self-esteem and self-reliance, both of which probably would help you in the showring.

Working at a barn is HARD, hot, messy, sweaty work. But somedays sitting in front of my computer monitor all day when the weather is beautiful I wish I had an outdoors job. Plus I could get my workout in while doing my job and skip the gym.

Carol Ames
Jun. 23, 2010, 06:14 PM
When teaching beginners, my first lesson hs always been : grooming; then leading them around bareback; second lesson tacking up; , lead around a few minutes or, have the horses follow me; has always worked ; but, after one first lesson; :cool: kids rush up to their Mom excited to tell her what they've done, groomed; Mom looks kids over , then says in a tone of disgust "you're filthy:mad:! she obviously needed the trainer in this thread:yes:!

Carol Ames
Jun. 23, 2010, 06:34 PM
sadly:sadsmile:, I would bet that this fits the image:winkgrin: many people have of themselves as Equestrians;)
Mom is supervising child cleaning stall. Woman approaches mom and child, and hands over business card. Normal converstion ensues ("lovely horse, pony, child, day, etc.). And then:

"But you know, your child CANNOT reach her FULL POTENTIAL mucking stalls. Children should spend their time RIDING and learning new skills, not grooming or cleaning stalls. Here's my card - I'll come to your barn, pick up your truck, trailer, horse, pony, load the trailer, bring your child to the show, unpack, etc...and you can fly in to see her rather than waste y'all's time with chores".

I wonder how much business this woman has? http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/images/buttons/quote.gif (http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=4936662)

Tamara in TN
Jun. 23, 2010, 06:47 PM
But you know, your child CANNOT reach her FULL POTENTIAL mucking stalls. Children should spend their time RIDING and learning new skills, not grooming or cleaning stalls. Here's my card - I'll come to your barn, pick up your truck, trailer, horse, pony, load the trailer, bring your child to the show, unpack, etc...and you can fly in to see her rather than waste y'all's time with chores".

I wonder how much business this woman has?

well it is at least partially true...I "worked" for lessons...I worked four days a week to get one 40 min lesson on a broke down QH schoolie...

did I mention I had to walk to get there and back ? it took about an hour....while the kids whose parents had cash just popped in and rode their horse that was boarded there and played and piddled and I watched them while I worked...

that nightmare ended when I got a job with a trail riding place working for a man who knew how to sell horses...fancy, fat, slick, poor, perfect or cull snides he could sell them...;)

and that is where I learned to really ride and be proud of my ability....we worked, but it was always in the saddle or handling them(sometimes 10 hours day, 8 of those mounted)...no scut work at all....and we made $10/day...hog heaven for a 15 yo...:):):):yes:

you haven't ridden til you've been on that wants to hurt you to make a point...:) good times those...

there are people who see rich families as tits to be milked and poor kids as help to be used and discarded...that is in every discipline....

Tamara in TN

AllyCat
Jun. 24, 2010, 12:44 PM
Because work ethic in one aspect of life could not POSSIBLY correlate to another. (Is there a little sarcasm thingy to put here?)

Concordia
Jun. 24, 2010, 12:53 PM
WOW. I WHOLEHEARTEDLY disagree that working FOR it is bad for a child.... infact, I believe quite the opposite.

As a coach myself, I see SO many kids these days who are just handed the horse, the lessons, the show money, trailer, etc, etc. And you know what? I don't think most of those kids really even like to ride. They have ZERO appreciation for it OR thier parents efforts.

Now, there is another group of kids at the barn too..... the ones who HAVE to work to pay for ANYTHING - even if it's one lesson a month! We have a few who work thier little butts off and full appreciate every second of not only riding but just being in the presence of the animals they love. Most of them are BETTER riders and have far more knowledge and experience then the previous group I mentioned: Not because they are more talented, but because the WANT it more. There is something to be said for working for your dream - it is so much sweeter when you achieve it.

My students tack thier own horses, scoop up after thier horses and clean up thier supplies and equipment after thier rides. Mom's and dads can HELP if need be, but I don't allow for them or anyone else to just do it for them. (this goes for the adults too!) LOL

I worked in a stable during my High School days and it really provided me with a LOT of experience and knowledge I wouldn't have otherwise gotten. I also learned that I didn't want to be a farm hand for my whole life so I went to college and got a degree LOL

But, now I am 30, have left the corporate world and ride and teach full time and an upper level barn. I truely believe the experience I got from 'working for it' has paid off in spades.

pony grandma
Jun. 24, 2010, 01:06 PM
Mucking stalls allows me to enjoy clarity of purpose. And at least I know when I've stepped in the sh*t. At work, I don't know that sometimes until I'm knee deep in it.

good one.

This thread wins the entertainment award today :lol: :lol:

fooler
Jun. 24, 2010, 05:00 PM
OTOHI can tell you that appearing in work clothes, boots, work gloves and picking up a pitchfork, and then actually :eek:mucking can lower one in the eyes of an employer:mad:; ask me :ohow I know:sadsmile:

And in the eyes of your fellow boarders, whose parents don't want them wasting time mucking etc. That is until riding time:D

On the other hand - some of those kids had time to meet others who gave them other opportunities. Opportunities those of us mucking missed as we were seen and possibly smelled as 'less' desirable.

Horse owners should know how to care for their own horses. However like anything in life too much or too little of most anything is detrimental

Risk-Averse Rider
Jun. 24, 2010, 05:05 PM
Coming a little late to the party, but with a tip of the hat to Lisa W-B, who pointed out this thread.

I have my guys (2 horses & a naughty pony) at home and with few exceptions, do all the poop picking.

I have solved many a coding problem for work while picking poop. The process itself is so simple:

Do While StallIsDirty
000If IsPoop Then
000000PickItUp()
000Else
000000LeaveItThere()
000End If
Loop

Leaves me lots of processing cycles to solve problems that have been bugging me. In fact, I've learned not to e-mail my boss for help until after I've had a chance to ponder the problem while poop picking.

leilatigress
Jun. 24, 2010, 05:12 PM
Coming a little late to the party, but with a tip of the hat to Lisa W-B, who pointed out this thread.

I have my guys (2 horses & a naughty pony) at home and with few exceptions, do all the poop picking.

I have solved many a coding problem for work while picking poop. The process itself is so simple:

Do While StallIsDirty
000If IsPoop Then
000000PickItUp()
000Else
000000LeaveItThere()
000End If
Loop

Leaves me lots of processing cycles to solve problems that have been bugging me. In fact, I've learned not to e-mail my boss for help until after I've had a chance to ponder the problem while poop picking.

Husband is learning to be a programmer. I wonder if he will take this as an activity to solve those questions he has as after about the 10th stall out of 30 I am about done thinking of problems to solve. Then again I am the one who dances down the aisle pushing the wheelbarrow too!

monstrpony
Jun. 24, 2010, 05:16 PM
Poop picking = quality thinking time.

I thought that was a no-brainer, but perhaps that is either logically impossible or oxymoronic. I'll ponder it later this afternoon ...

Jumphigh83
Jun. 27, 2010, 12:44 PM
Thus proving once again that any moron can hang a shingle and print a business card...;)

LexInVA
Jun. 27, 2010, 12:45 PM
Thus proving once again that any moron can hang a shingle and print a business card...;)

To do both at the same truly separates the great ones from the not-so-great ones. :lol:

tres grey
Jun. 27, 2010, 01:34 PM
Haha, I was slugging ice out of water troughs in freezing temperatures and picking stalls in the heat of the day before my mom knew riding wasn't just a 'phase'.

On another note, I love a good mucking session. Its therapeutic and instantly gratifying.

Bobthehorse
Jun. 27, 2010, 01:42 PM
Another thread asks about cracks in the foundation - this attitude is one reason for those cracks.


:yes::yes:

JollyBadger
Jun. 27, 2010, 02:25 PM
Horse owners should know how to care for their own horses. However like anything in life too much or too little of most anything is detrimental

^^This!:yes::yes:

Wigwag
Jul. 2, 2010, 08:58 PM
I never had a problem mucking stalls, and have done it off and on over the years to discount board or earn lessons. Unfortunately at this point in my life, I board far enough away that mucking to discount board wouldn't even be worth it given the cost of gas! But as a teenager, it worked out wonderfully.

archieflies
Jul. 2, 2010, 11:50 PM
Hmm... by her own reasoning... if she's offering to do all that for them... then she must really suck at riding! Those who can't do, teach, eh?

gully's pilot
Jul. 3, 2010, 04:09 AM
Honestly, I was at riding camp last week with my daughter, who's 12. At a camp dinner I was telling one of the instructors about my tragically horseless childhood, about how I started riding in college because I could finally make my own choices--I paid for the lessons myself, of course (lots of stall mucking! plus whatever other jobs I could find). The instructor turned to my daughter, who got her own pony at age 4 (granted, a giveaway, but still--age 4!) and said, "See how lucky you are!" My daughter enthusiastically agreed. She's been doing barn chores every day since age 4. We were laughing at camp because many of the campers in their early teens have a parent as chaperone (required), who of course help some with the chores if for no other reason than that they are bored, whereas my poor kid, with a riding mother, has to do everything entirely by herself--said totally tongue in cheek, because she's having a blast.

It's okay to ruin some children's self-esteem. They don't really need to think they're that special.