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FoxChaser
Jun. 21, 2010, 08:49 PM
Well, I had planned to make Penny Oaks my comeback after having my second child in April (rode at PO last year as my last time out), but apparently over-did it coming back after my c-section and am finding myself unable to ride until things quit hurting again. I had my trainer put 30 days on my boy to make sure he would take care of my out of shape self and don't want to lose what fitness she put back on him, so am planning a major ground work campaign until I can get back in the tack. Anyway, what type of side reins do you all like? Doughnuts? Elastic?? I have only lunged my horses sparingly and have never used them much. I'll have my trainer watching over me, but am not sure which ones I'd like to use. Any advice? My horse is a steady eddie when it comes to lunging and has gone in side reins before for her. Thanks!

Ibex
Jun. 21, 2010, 09:08 PM
Different things for different horses... if he's happy and steady, probably the doughnut ones would do the job perfectly well.

I use "triangle" reins for my mare (aka Running Side Reins, Vienna Reins, Lauffer Reins etc). She likes to lean and they give her nothing to lean ON. I know someone else who also uses them for a horse that gets rigid in regular side reins.

The big trick is the length - too long and they don't do anything, too short and they're not going to be able to reach/stretch (or worse yet, will get panicked).

lecoeurtriste
Jun. 21, 2010, 09:35 PM
I'm a huge fan of lunging on two lines (through a surcingle with crupper and breast collar). You have complete control over how much "room" the horse has to stretch down or work a bit more up without having to stop and adjust tack. You can also keep a light, but constant contact just as you would if in the saddle.

On my well-schooled horse, I run both lines from the bit through the top rings on the surcingle...on the babies/greenies, the outside line goes from the bit through the surcingle, but the inside line goes through the bit to the surcingle (low rings on both sides).

If you don't have a surcingle, you can run the lines through your stirrups (if they're run up and secured).

Good Luck!

wildlifer
Jun. 22, 2010, 08:53 AM
I prefer vienna reins vastly over side reins -- more adjustability for horse to find their balance point and much more encouragement to stretch over the topline into the bit.

ThirdCharm
Jun. 22, 2010, 09:16 AM
Yeah I prefer vienna reins..... or better yet longeing with two reins. Unfortunately you can't do either at a competition which is STUPID (right coeur?) (But you can crank down on some sidereins, longe a horse completely out of control, or trot around with your running martingale adjusted down to the chest strap....)

Jennifer

Eventer55
Jun. 22, 2010, 09:20 AM
Well, I had planned to make Penny Oaks my comeback after having my second child in April (rode at PO last year as my last time out), but apparently over-did it coming back after my c-section and am finding myself unable to ride until things quit hurting again. I had my trainer put 30 days on my boy to make sure he would take care of my out of shape self and don't want to lose what fitness she put back on him, so am planning a major ground work campaign until I can get back in the tack. Anyway, what type of side reins do you all like? Doughnuts? Elastic?? I have only lunged my horses sparingly and have never used them much. I'll have my trainer watching over me, but am not sure which ones I'd like to use. Any advice? My horse is a steady eddie when it comes to lunging and has gone in side reins before for her. Thanks!

Not to be snarky, but why not ask your trainer which ones she prefers, since she's helping you. then you'll both be on the same page.

wolfmare
Jun. 22, 2010, 09:44 AM
Not to be snarky, but why not ask your trainer which ones she prefers, since she's helping you. then you'll both be on the same page.

Or take this opportunity to learn more, and different methods, and other peoples reasoning behind it.
Curiosity did not kill the cat, he is sitting right beside me. :)

Eventer55
Jun. 22, 2010, 10:06 AM
Ok, I should have continued my post and said Your instructor probably has a prefered method (style) which she can talk to you about. This way you don't show up with equipment and she does not have a preference for and you end up having to buy more.


In the meantime we are happy to talk to you about our use of side reins. I actually prefer the doughnut because they last longer and they are the preference of my instructor.

NE_Rider
Jun. 22, 2010, 10:10 AM
Personally, I prefer side reins with elastic inserts (such as these (http://www.bitofbritain.com/Nunn_Finer_Leather_Side_Reins_w_Elastic_p/0196.htm)), as the rubber donuts sometimes get a bounce going which can be annoying to the horse (even if they are on the surcingle end). The other option is to buy side reins without elastic, and add an elastic insert of some type (something like this (http://www.bitofbritain.com/Rein_Aid_Inserts_p/9359.htm)). I use the second option, as horses respond better to different amounts of stretch, so it is easy to adjust for each horse.

Long lining (or longeing with two lines) is an excellent way of working your horse, as the exercises may be varied and more difficult! Also, some horses (such as my gelding) strongly prefer to be long lined rather than longed.

Good luck, and I hope you are back in the saddle, soon!!!!

Ibex
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:08 AM
Yeah I prefer vienna reins..... or better yet longeing with two reins. Unfortunately you can't do either at a competition which is STUPID (right coeur?) (But you can crank down on some sidereins, longe a horse completely out of control, or trot around with your running martingale adjusted down to the chest strap....)

Jennifer

Maybe double check that! Vienna reins are now allowed at both US and Canadian recognized Dressage shows, and at Canadian Horse Trials...

It's a new rule, but I know for dressage it even had diagrams so you could print them and take them to the show with you to show anyone who questions it...

ETA: Yup! They're now allowed!

Page 11 of http://www.usef.org/documents/ruleBook/2010/13-EV.pdf

1. EXERCISE AREAS. The following restrictions begin at 3:00 p.m. of the day prior to the
start of the entire competition and continue throughout the duration of the event. The following
are compulsory: an English type saddle and any form of bridle, including double bridle,
snaffle, gag or hackamores. Running martingales with rein stops, Irish martingales, bit
guards, boots, bandages, fly shields, nose covers, and seat covers are permitted. Side reins
are permitted only while lunging an unmounted horse, as are running reins and chambons.
Other martingales, any form of gadget (such as a bearing, running or balancing reins, etc.)
and any form of blinkers, are forbidden, under penalty of disqualification. (bold mine)

FoxChaser
Jun. 22, 2010, 11:43 AM
Thanks for the responses! My trainer used the doughnut kind because she thinks the elastic ones give perhaps a bit too much (rider wouldn't ride with that much give to the hand). I don't think the doughnuts I've seen give much at all unless the horse is really pulling. My guy can get heavy in my hand (part of the reason I'm having to sit out some more- he gets heavy & I compensate with some bracing and pulling abs that weren't ready to be pulled yet) so I don't want to encourage that. As wolfmare said, I'm just trying to get a bit more of an education :) I've long lined before, but it was years and years ago with my old well-seasoned screw up-proof horse. Maybe it's time to learn again!

lecoeurtriste
Jun. 22, 2010, 02:39 PM
I think Thirdcharm was referring to working with two independent lines as being illegal at competition (which they are)...I was busted last year and cured of my ignorance! ;)

Fancy That
Jun. 23, 2010, 12:44 PM
Different things for different horses... if he's happy and steady, probably the doughnut ones would do the job perfectly well.

I use "triangle" reins for my mare (aka Running Side Reins, Vienna Reins, Lauffer Reins etc). She likes to lean and they give her nothing to lean ON. I know someone else who also uses them for a horse that gets rigid in regular side reins.

The big trick is the length - too long and they don't do anything, too short and they're not going to be able to reach/stretch (or worse yet, will get panicked).

I prefer this much more. The key is to really get IMPULSION & FORWARD from behind. There is an art to lunging correctly, and most of us aren't very good at it (including me) I don't really do it often.

But when I was working with a dressage instructor, I did do it regularly, in the Vienna/Running/Sliding/Triangle reins.....and that, coupled with correct dressage riding, helped my mare build her topline :)

bornfreenowexpensive
Jun. 23, 2010, 01:18 PM
Maybe double check that! Vienna reins are now allowed at both US and Canadian recognized Dressage shows, and at Canadian Horse Trials...

It's a new rule, but I know for dressage it even had diagrams so you could print them and take them to the show with you to show anyone who questions it...

ETA: Yup! They're now allowed!

Page 11 of http://www.usef.org/documents/ruleBook/2010/13-EV.pdf
(bold mine)


hummm....I always thought they were allowed...you just can not attach them between the legs. And I don't think you are allowed to long line...

As with all side reins...it is important to get the horse working from behind. Which sort of side reins I like...and how I attach them...totally depends on the horse.

FoxChaser
Jun. 23, 2010, 02:15 PM
The Vienna/ Lauffer reins it is then. I found some through Dressage Extensions. Thank you all so much for your input!

Ibex
Jun. 23, 2010, 04:35 PM
hummm....I always thought they were allowed...you just can not attach them between the legs. And I don't think you are allowed to long line...


Long lining is still out.. The USDF diagram shows the Vienna reins between the legs as acceptable, with identical wording in the rules, so I'm guessing it's ok.

Page 20: http://www.usef.org/documents/ruleBook/2010/08-DR.pdf

What you can't do is attach your plain side reins between the legs like a tie-down.

ThirdCharm
Jun. 23, 2010, 05:50 PM
Yeah sorry it's only long lining that is illegal.... :-)

Jennifer