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Friday1
Jun. 19, 2010, 07:07 PM
15 for a 4 yr old wb/tb. Mostly wb but not thick at all. Lovely gates. Incredibly quiet and well behaved. No vices. Had not evented yet, but schooling bn and novice xc. Solid in stadium. Could put on very nice bn dressage test.

Little looky to fences at times, but very uncomplicated ride.

yellowbritches
Jun. 19, 2010, 07:11 PM
Depends on the breeding, the type, the ride it gives me and the budget...with the budget I usually get to work with, well, no. But if I had some money to spend, I can see spending that on the right youngster.

Just a little bit of a soapbox moment...while I don't ever want to see event horse prices going the way of the hunters, I DO think that to encourage breeders to breed for the sport, people have GOT to be willing to spend a little money on babies bred for a purpose. :yes:

bornfreenowexpensive
Jun. 19, 2010, 07:16 PM
15 for a 4 yr old wb/tb. Mostly wb but not thick at all. Lovely gates. Incredibly quiet and well behaved. No vices. Had not evented yet, but schooling bn and novice xc. Solid in stadium. Could put on very nice bn dressage test.

Little looky to fences at times, but very uncomplicated ride.



of course....but depends completely on the horse. I know unbroke 2 year olds that are sold easily for 15K. Typically not into eventing homes....but sometimes.

Now if you said he was 15.1 .... might be a harder sale. Or if he looks like he is going to top out in scope at training...or has some sort of conformational flaw...etc. Also really depends on where he is located.

Friday1
Jun. 19, 2010, 07:20 PM
I often wonder what us event folks will pay and the market is so soft these days.

Really curious to see if folks would consider it if they had thebudget.

subk
Jun. 19, 2010, 07:24 PM
15 for a 4 yr old wb/tb. Mostly wb but not thick at all. Lovely gates. Incredibly quiet and well behaved. No vices. Had not evented yet, but schooling bn and novice xc. Solid in stadium. Could put on very nice bn dressage test.

Little looky to fences at times, but very uncomplicated ride.
Your going to get lots of different answers here.

Most 4 yr olds right now are young 4 year olds so I'd be very weary of a "looky" one whose is being schooled at 3' at that age. Personally as long as they are looking at things I keep the fences very small. I realize I'm not the norm! :D But then that was my problem a year and half ago when I was in the market for a 4 year old. Most of what I was seeing was further along in their training than I like to see at 4 and most of those had issues I already felt were going to have to be untrained/retrained. I bought a 3 year old and had a slow year instead. My budget was not quite at 15k, more like 10-12, but I ended up spending a lot less and don't think I could have anything I like more now that he's 4...

bornfreenowexpensive
Jun. 19, 2010, 07:24 PM
I often wonder what us event folks will pay and the market is so soft these days.

Really curious to see if folks would consider it if they had thebudget.


Quality horses are still selling..but they do need to be in the right location. I know of several that have sold. Especially if the get to a couple of shows.

ETA: But I do agree with Subk..most 4 year olds that I've had were not doing that much this time of year. hacking out...going to little dressage shows...etc.

BigRuss1996
Jun. 19, 2010, 07:42 PM
If he was a really nice 4 yr old and well suited to the job...yes easily. I have paid that and more for Irish sporthorses and then had to pay to fly them home on top of that. All ended up being more then we hoped and they were all totally unbroken at purchase.
Also today it costs alot more to raise and bring along a young horse then it use to.

subk
Jun. 19, 2010, 08:04 PM
ETA: But I do agree with Subk..most 4 year olds that I've had were not doing that much this time of year. hacking out...going to little dressage shows...etc.
Just in case I wasn't clear...I don't have any problem with a 4 year old looking at stuff as I don't think that's much of an indicator of future performance. What concerns me is whether I want to work with one that is a product what I view (again that's personal) as a less than desirable training system. Training is a whole lot easier than RE-training!

deltawave
Jun. 19, 2010, 08:16 PM
Really curious to see if folks would consider it if they had the budget. Sure, but that's a very large "if". :) 15K could get you a lot of horse, even horses, but if you had a specific goal in mind and a 4yo fit the bill, why not? For myself, since that's more than I paid for a going CCI* schoolmaster, it would have to be AWFULLY special. And my idea of "special" is altogether different than what an ULR would define as special.

bornfreenowexpensive
Jun. 19, 2010, 08:35 PM
Just in case I wasn't clear...I don't have any problem with a 4 year old looking at stuff as I don't think that's much of an indicator of future performance. What concerns me is whether I want to work with one that is a product what I view (again that's personal) as a less than desirable training system. Training is a whole lot easier than RE-training!


I think I understood....I prefer buying unbroke...or buying youngsters who I've known all along and know what sort of training program they have been in....for the same reason.

I also don't expect a 4 year old to be rock solid in stadium....and if they are, it raises red flags for me they they may have been pushed. It may not be true....it just raises red flags. My last guy could easily jump 3' courses by this time of year....but I wouldn't say he was soild or uncomplicated:eek:....just big and scopy and 3 foot was a very easy height for him....hell, he makes 3'6" fences look small.

AKB
Jun. 19, 2010, 10:18 PM
It all depends on if the horse is for resale or is to be your dream horse. If he is your dream horse, why not pay $15,000 if he is exactly what you want. Ride him at least 3 times and get a good vetting, to be sure he really is your dream horse.

My daughter is about to go and look at a barely broken 5 year old IDSH who is priced at $15,000. He is the breeding and size that she wants. I don't know if he will turn out to be the right horse for her, but he is worth looking at, even though the price is high. The other horse she plans to look at is, I think, $8,000 or $9,000. He is the right breeding, but is an unbroken 2 year old. I'd rather she get a 5 year old.

If resale is your plan, it will be hard to make money on the horse if you spend $15,000 on the initial purchase.

Remember that horse prices are often negotiable.

GotSpots
Jun. 20, 2010, 08:48 AM
I've seen a number of very fancy four year olds priced around 15K this year. These are ones who have the breeding and movement and brain to be stars in either the eventing world or dressage or jumpers. Even for resale, 15K may not be a bad price for them - in another year or two, these are going to likely be big money horses (of course, all the caveats apply re: difficulty of making any money in horses).

But for a horse of lesser quality, I might not spend that much. It all depends on how nice the horse is and what it's intended job is to be. In other words, horses are worth what you pay for them - it's pretty hard to say that there's any type of set price for a three or four year old.

DiablosHalo
Jun. 21, 2010, 07:45 AM
I have a 4yo ISH that is VERY well started with a few small shows under his belt for $15k. He leaves this weekend to go to a trainer on consignment and after 30-60 days they are confident they'll get $20k+. He is purpose bred to be an upper level horse and is big, sound, and correct. He's got all the makings of a truely 'nice' horse, but of course- time will tell how far he'll go! So.. $15k is not outrageous for the right horse for the right person at the right time. :)

RiskyBuisness
Jun. 21, 2010, 01:36 PM
We just purchased a 5 year old, with 30 days on him--not super fancy on the flat, but nice and correct, with tons of scope--for 15k. However, the negotiations with the seller were protracted and we set a limit going in, knowing we would be willing to spend 25k on him if it came to that.

Now, 25k for a horse with 30 days (no steering, only free jumped) on it may seem like a hefty price tag, however, the horse in question was bred to be an upper level event horse (**** parents on both sides), and appeared to have the mentality and jump to do great things. Now that we've had him a month I can safely say even 25k would have been a STEAL.

At the end of the day, prices depend on what you're selling, and to whom. Know your market...

Ghazzu
Jun. 21, 2010, 01:48 PM
15 for a 4 yr old wb/tb. Mostly wb but not thick at all. Lovely gates.

It would depend on the gates.
Automatic opening,security keypad, custom wrought iron?
Maybe.

wildlifer
Jun. 21, 2010, 02:08 PM
No way, I wouldn't. But that doesn't mean other people won't. A horse is only worth what the person who wants to buy him will pay.

OneDaySoon
Jun. 21, 2010, 02:56 PM
15 for a 4 yr old wb/tb. Mostly wb but not thick at all. Lovely gates. Incredibly quiet and well behaved. No vices. Had not evented yet, but schooling bn and novice xc. Solid in stadium. Could put on very nice bn dressage test.

Little looky to fences at times, but very uncomplicated ride.

Definately. Sounds like a very good ammy prospect as well and they are worth every penny for the joy of having something sane and very pleasant to ride.

My 4 year old WB/TB was very looky in the early days and was rock solid within the year. Just takes a little life experience. With all the other nice attributes I would take the next step to the PPE exam and additional test rides.

clivers
Jun. 21, 2010, 03:19 PM
I have done it, but I'm not sure I would do it again.

I've bought and brought along several horses to become eventers. I actually did pay that figure for a 4 year old TBxWB by Salut in 2004. He was a nice horse and we won a bit at novice, but he didn't become the upper level horse I had hoped for due to a combination of soundness and suitability (for eventing) reasons. He's now been sold into the hunter ring and is cleaning up.

IMO training up a youngster is such a gamble wrt soundness, suitability/enjoyment of eventing etc. that I no longer feel it is worth it for a rider who aspires to compete. On the other hand, it's a completely different story if the riders goals are to improve as a trainer, or to train up and sell...

Beam Me Up
Jun. 21, 2010, 03:36 PM
Me? No.
If I had 15K to spend on a horse (I wish!) I'd probably want to mitigate risk (as if that were possible) and buy something more proven.

If he is nice enough to be a serious prospect, I think a serious rider will definitely pay that, esp if he is bred for eventing and a really good mover, as OTTBs don't usually show that in the first 30 days.

I suspect that most amateurs will want either cheaper or more experienced.

I will say the 2 "nicest" horses I ever bought (a 4 yo OTTB from Charles Town, that was so talented, and a drop dead gorgeous event-type WB/TB with 60 days) turned out to be my least successful purchases. My trainers at the time loved both initially, were declared serious upper level prospects. The OTTB did a few novices, the YEH5, but didn't have a willing attitude, didn't want to play at anything, really. The WBx was sweet and quiet and adorable, but never really "figured out" jumping. He did 2 baby events before I called it quits.

All of this is just to illustrate that it's a long way between 4 and say, prelim, and I'm not sure that I personally could risk that much money on something so early in the game. But the more money you have, the less scary that investment sounds.

Bobthehorse
Jun. 21, 2010, 04:02 PM
I guess it depends on what you want.

I spent 15k on a 4 year old green broke WB/TB (but very TBy) who had been over a couple small cross rails, wasnt going in much contact yet, and mostly had been hacked out. I was paying for potential, not training. And he had it (though I admit I didnt see it, I had no experience with babies, but my coach just loved him).

Bobthehorse
Jun. 21, 2010, 04:03 PM
The WBx was sweet and quiet and adorable, but never really "figured out" jumping. He did 2 baby events before I called it quits.

Mine took 2 years to figure it out, but I am sure glad I stuck it out with him, he is a late bloomer but he is really turning out to be something. His first 2 shows he was kind of ridiculous to watch jump.

Beam Me Up
Jun. 21, 2010, 04:17 PM
^^ Yeah, it was a really tough call for me. I had him over 3 years (age 4 - age 8), tried a lot of different things with him (we "restarted" completely a couple times, did some hunters), and several times felt I had him together enough to show him, which I did with mixed results.

I guess I finally felt like my time would be better spent with a different horse, but I'll never know if it was the right call. Or, maybe I will if his new owner has more success than I did.

Almost Heaven
Jun. 21, 2010, 05:00 PM
$15K is average retail pricing for 3 or 4 year old warmblood. Nothing unusual in that. But the devil is in the details.

Would I pay that? No, but I'm in the resale market and I don't pay retail.