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View Full Version : The Good news ... and the bad. *sigh* Life on the farm ain't easy.



Oldenburg Mom
Jun. 17, 2010, 08:29 AM
The good news: the groundhogs underneath the barn are GONE GONE GONE GONE!!!

Whooop whooop whoop. I've been trying to get rid of them for YEARS!

Eh... wait a minute. That whoop whoop was a little too soon.

Now I've got a family of skunks.

I'm so discouraged I could just bawl. I came home yesterday, went out to see the two mares that are in during the day ... and there were two baby skunks running around the barn.

NOW what? Any advise ... ???

Edgewood
Jun. 17, 2010, 08:31 AM
The good news: the groundhogs underneath the barn are GONE GONE GONE GONE!!!

Whooop whooop whoop. I've been trying to get rid of them for YEARS!

Eh... wait a minute. That whoop whoop was a little too soon.

Now I've got a family of skunks.

I'm so discouraged I could just bawl. I came home yesterday, went out to see the two mares that are in during the day ... and there were two baby skunks running around the barn.

NOW what? Any advise ... ???

Get a gas mask! ;) Just kidding OMOM. I have no advice for skunks....sorry.:sadsmile:

JSwan
Jun. 17, 2010, 08:33 AM
Ahhhh skunks.

The stink that's distinct!
:lol:


Throw some mothballs into the hole and they'll move.

To keep them away soak a rag in ammonia and place it at the entrance to the den.

MistyBlue
Jun. 17, 2010, 08:34 AM
Sometimes better the enemy you know, huh? :winkgrin:

Did you cover/fill in and pack the groundhog burrows? If not, something else will move right in.

You could get a fisher to get rid of the skunks...but you probably won't want one of those around either. They don't smell much better and have pretty short tempers.

daisyduke
Jun. 17, 2010, 09:17 AM
A few years back I went for an evening ride in our pasture. I saw a skunk moseying along and when I finished my ride, reported the sighting to my husband. He said if we've got one, we've got a family. Sure enough, after some searching, we found evidence of skunks in a huge wood pile. Let me tell you, you have never smelt or seen anything that disgusting. We donned rubber gloves and masks and had to remove the whole wood pile (decades of wood chopping). Their feces is like tar and the smell is horrific. It was hands down the most disgusting clean up I have ever had to do. They were living quite comfortably with our barn cats, enjoying the cat food and shelter. Now our main pests are porcupines. Every so often, one wanders into our yard and tangles with the dogs. The dogs have yet to win a battle.

Zu Zu
Jun. 17, 2010, 09:24 AM
Sorry for the Skunks ~mothballs as suggested will kill cats and other domestic animals so please be careful. Perhaps traps and then destory them as they do carry diseases like rabies,,,,bait traps with cat food skunks love wet cat food !

suz
Jun. 17, 2010, 09:41 AM
i've got porkies and skunks and aside form the intital encounters with them, everyone gets along fine. the porkies and skunks are usually sleeping while the domesticated animals are up and about, and we've had no issues.

Calvincrowe
Jun. 17, 2010, 10:13 AM
My first reaction was, "oh, how adorable were the baby skunks!? Did you get pictures?!", but, then, I'm rather fond of wildlife living in close proximity to me, as long as they are not actively killing or eating my pets/livestock.

Please just gently move them along. I get so sad when I see posters on here asking how to kill something that we've "invited" in by creating a warm, comfortable new environment for.

Granted, here in the PNW we don't seem to have quite the burrowing animal issues ya'll do over on the other coast. Or the snake issue. Eesh.

Oldenburg Mom
Jun. 17, 2010, 10:25 AM
"oh, how adorable were the baby skunks!? Did you get pictures?!"

Yes, actually, they were pretty cute.

And when I came in the barn, yup, I just said ... "ok guys, c'mon move it along." And move along they did.

I have to say, at lease now I know why I don't have a rodent problem. Skunks LOVE mice (I think.)

If I'm not mistaken, I don't think skunks are diggers? Are they? That's why the moved into the GH's den... ? But I didn't know the GH's had left. Would the S's chase the GH's out of their den?

CatOnLap
Jun. 17, 2010, 11:15 AM
skunks feed on baby groundhogs,baby rabbits, baby rats, mice, baby snakes, slugs, beetles and all manner of pests. They are not aggressive and dig a single burrow usually in a discreet place, so they are much safer to have around than rabbits, rats or groundhogs.

Thank your skunks for solving your GH problem.

If you want the rats and groundhogs back, just move the skunks to a different location.

Calvincrowe
Jun. 17, 2010, 11:27 AM
And, left alone, skunks are pretty safe and won't actually spray. Heck, I saw a special on them on PBS, and they apparently make pretty good pets, once de-skunked, of course. Isn't there a whole town that has skunks roaming around it? I must stop watching so much public TV!:lol:

NoDQhere
Jun. 17, 2010, 11:29 AM
I don't believe skunks "carry" rabies, you know like in a little knapsack, just waiting to spread it around. Skunks, like all mammals are susceptible to rabies. Chances are, if you have a family, you have healthy skunks.

They are excellent mousers and won't generally hurt your cats. And cats don't usually get sprayed. They seem to get along well together. I've seen our cats walk past a skunk and neither did a thing. Skunks are placid little creatures and if you don't scare them they don't spray. We had a "wild" skunk in our chicken house for years. He was missing a front leg from a trap and was quite tame. I "accidentally" petted him more than once and he never sprayed. He never ate more than an egg or two and never bothered the birds. He could spray as we found out when the dog tried to chase him!

I would leave them alone as others have said. They will keep other more destructive critters away. If you catch the babies young and have them desented they really make fun pets.

2DogsFarm
Jun. 17, 2010, 11:57 AM
If I'm not mistaken, I don't think skunks are diggers? Are they?

:yes: oh they are diggers extraordinaire!
Not only for their burrows, but who do you think leaves all those neat little holes in your lawn after they remove the grubs?

Actually my skunks & I coexist quite nicely.

Like NoDQ, I too have come thisclose to petting one of the B&W "kittycats", mistaking it for my gray & white barncat at night.

And last Winter was the last time I will store hay in my indoor.
When I moved the empty pallets this Spring I discovered "something" had burrowed in from outside and then surprised one of the squatters who just ambled sleepily out of the barn.

I have had a family set up housekeeping nearby and surprised them digging for grubs at night along with finding the babies playing in my barn. Lights go on and they wander out the way they came in.
I do vaccinate my horses for rabies as they have been identified as a vector in my area.

But aside from the first time I tried shooing an adult out of the barn with a broom and he/she just gave me a look, then turned around sloooowly...
we just give each other the time of day and go about our evening business.
"After you, my dear Alphonse..."

Jynx
Jun. 17, 2010, 12:02 PM
We gave up getting rid of the skunks years ago and took the "better the stinky you know than the stinky you don't" philosophy.

Lately a half-grown one, Pepe Le Pew, has been coming in for the evening cat feeding. The startle factor, on both sides, is what worries me the most. Otherwise Pepe just moseys along. I just talk to him/her and make sure he/she knows where I am. It brushed one of the cat's chin with its tail as it walked around yesterday. The cat just looked disdainful.

Coons and possums are bigger pains with coyotes ont the top of the "isn't nature wonderful?" list.

But we do not have rats.

lcw579
Jun. 17, 2010, 12:22 PM
And, left alone, skunks are pretty safe and won't actually spray. Heck, I saw a special on them on PBS, and they apparently make pretty good pets, once de-skunked, of course. Isn't there a whole town that has skunks roaming around it? I must stop watching so much public TV!:lol:

I saw that show! Yup, there is a whole town that had them everywhere. Not sure I like them that much. :lol:

We had a family that lived around our house for a time. The little ones used to walk by my husband when he was grilling. I'm pretty sure he was filling up the cat dishes for them at night. He loved them til they got a bit bigger and decided to test their toughness by turning their backs and raising their tails. :lol: Dumb little guys, that ended the free nightly buffet.

Count me as another who has spent time talking to the kitty that ain't a kitty. Not sure what would have happened if I'd tried to pet it. We would often find them sitting on the porch with our cats.

Foxtrot's
Jun. 17, 2010, 12:34 PM
No experience with skunks here - but if they would get rid of the rats burrowing uner my barn I THINK I would welcome them. My neighbour says they are not as trigger happy as some think - they get used to the comings and goings.

LookinForSpace
Jun. 17, 2010, 12:50 PM
Coons and possums are bigger pains with coyotes ont the top of the "isn't nature wonderful?" list.



Why are possums a pain? We have them around here for years and I've never noticed that they got into anything. Of course, I don't have chickens or any kind of food/feed for animals outside (I don't live on a farm).

Jynx
Jun. 17, 2010, 03:51 PM
Opossums can carry EPM. If your horse ingests something they pooped on, they can get it.

Bluey
Jun. 17, 2010, 04:09 PM
Around here skunks are the main rabies reservoir in our wildlife and any close to any habitation is killed, because the chance of it becoming rabid is great.
Animal health control tests several a month and most come back positive.
They truly are a health hazard here.
Wildlife belongs in the wild, not around human dwellings.
Try not to make it easy for them to live there and they will go where they belong, in the wild.

We had a family of skunks living below the cattle scales, that are set on a pit.
We had been smelling them, but not seeing them and then we went to weight some cattle one day.
The one that went in the little bitty cattle scales metal tin building came back with fleas like a black wave raising up his pant legs.:eek:
We had a can of OFF and sprayed him to soak and that stopped them, but we didn't weight the cattle that day, we fumigated for several days, before anyone dared go in there again.
I guess fumigating with those spray bombs took care of the fleas and skunks, because they left too.

Cute as they may be, I don't think it is sensible to try to live with skunks around houses and barns.:no:

CatOnLap
Jun. 17, 2010, 05:49 PM
Bluey, you are spreading fear and mythconceptions about skunks.

I had a review article on rabies come across my desk recently.

Interestingly, of the 30 or so cases of human rabies that have occurred in Canada and the USA in the last 20 years, not one could be attributed to a skunk.

Not one.

About half were attributed to bats, but of the 15 or so cases attributed to bats, only one case actually had physical contact with a bat- the rest were presumed bites, although no bite could be demonstrated in any of those cases.

The remainder of the rabies cases were all because of domestic animal bites ( dogs and cats). Although there are an estimated 6 million pet skuinks in the USA, there has never been a recorded incident of a human catching rabies from a pet skunk.

The Center for Disease Control in Atlanta states that there is no such thing as a carrier state of rabies in any mammal, including skunks, meaning that the animals cannot have the virus in their saliva and remain free of rabies symptoms. If they have rabies, they are sick with rabies. They die within about 18 days from it. They do not carry it unless they are already sick with it and about to die.

Skunks are feared and blamed and in texas, apparently KILLED for being a resevoir for rabies, but it is clear they are very little risk to humans.

You are more likely to be hit by lightening.

Bluey
Jun. 17, 2010, 06:09 PM
---"Bluey, you are spreading fear and mythconceptions about skunks."---


I posted what our animal health board is telling everyone around here on PSA on TV news stories, regularly, starting in the spring, when skunks are on the move.
It is public information, not misinformation.
Here are some stories and confirmed cases of rabies on skunks:

http://www.connectamarillo.com/news/story.aspx?id=288018

http://www.connectamarillo.com/news/story.aspx?id=331765

CatOnLap
Jun. 17, 2010, 06:48 PM
Oh Bluey, you have company but it ain't good...
well, I suppose in Texas, they know better than in Georgia (CDC). The expert quoted in your news article is simply wrong when he says that skunks "carry" rabies.

They do suffer and die from the disease and can transmit it to other skunks, maybe even to other animals if they happen to bite them, which is not typical and has not been demonstrated, but there is no such thing as a carrier state in rabies without being acutely ill.

And even in Texas, where the animal is hunted and vilified in this way, there is not a recorded case of skunk to human transmission of rabies in the last 20 years.

You are more likely to be gored by a longhorn than catch rabies from a skunk in Texas.

Bluey
Jun. 17, 2010, 07:10 PM
Skunks are a reservoir species, that means a species very susceptible and that keeps infecting some and crashing and rebuilding and so on.

We have had cases of cats and dogs and at least one horse I know of bitten by a rabid skunk, then testing positive and people that came in contact with them needing shots.

The reason more people don't die is because everyone is aware and careful and vaccinating the animals we come in direct contact with, like our pets and horses, keeps us rather safe.
Remember, very few animals are tested, but the ratio to tested to positive is very high.
That tells us they are the tip of the iceberg of cases.
Who knows how many other sick ones we never see.
I have called them on obviously sick, mybe rabid skunks and coons and they said they didn't have the funds to test them all.
If it had not bitten anyone, they would not test it.

http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/region1/news2007marchrabies.shtm

You take this up with the public health advisors.;)

Sing Mia Song
Jun. 18, 2010, 11:51 AM
And even in Texas, where the animal is hunted and vilified in this way, there is not a recorded case of skunk to human transmission of rabies in the last 20 years.


I'm not supporting wholesale extermination, but I think that you have to entertain the possibility that there isn't a recorded case of skunk to human transmission in Texas BECAUSE of said hunting and vilifying. ;) After all, a reduction in numbers also decreases the likelihood of contact, does it not?

Also, just because there are no cases of skunk to human transmission doesn't mean that livestock have not been infected.

FWIW, I have no dog in this fight. I know I have skunks on my farm because I see the grub-digging holes. But the only skunk I've seen was one exhibiting symptoms of rabies (I'm a vet tech and a masters of public health, and as such am unfortunately thoroughly familiar with neurologic symptoms). We shot it, but the local authorities declined to test it because there was no human contact--despite that it was right next to my dairy farmer neighbor's pasture.

And now I just have to hijack this thread briefly to tell my favorite vet tech rabies story from when I managed an emergency clinic.

Scene: Middle of rush hour on a weeknight. Phone rings.

Me: Emergency Animal Center, how can I help you?

Caller: Yeah, what exit are you off the highway?

Me: 22. Do you have a pet that needs care?

Caller: No--yes--well, sort up. I was driving up the road and I saw this raccoon and he was sitting up on the road and his little ears were moving, so I got out and picked him up. Can you help him?

Me: Ah...no, I'm sorry, we cannot treat rabies vectors. All we can do is euthanize them.

Caller: What? Isn't there anywhere I can take him where they're not going to kill him?? He's okay, he just needs to be checked out. [B]I mean, he's sitting here on my lap growling at me while I'm driving on I-270, so I know he's going to be okay.

:eek:

Bluey
Jun. 18, 2010, 12:06 PM
No one here is talking extermination, just keep them off houses and barns.
We have some a little over a mile from the house, by a windmill and they are welcome to stay there.
Around the house and in the barn, they don't belong here and really, if they are here and acting sick, they sure don't.

Living with some wild life around is about common sense, like not having skunks around here, where some are rabid.
Do you want to play russian roulette that one of those you may have around your barn won't be rabid eventually, if that is a problem in your area?

JSwan
Jun. 18, 2010, 12:11 PM
Bwwwwahahahahahahahahahaha!!!!!!!!!!!!:lol::lol::l ol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

(we don't test around here unless the animal has bitten a human) Really plays havoc with statistics because the public is left to deal with suspect wildlife on their own. ACO's/cops/CPO's won't respond unless there is an attack on a person.





Scene: Middle of rush hour on a weeknight. Phone rings.

Me: Emergency Animal Center, how can I help you?

Caller: Yeah, what exit are you off the highway?

Me: 22. Do you have a pet that needs care?

Caller: No--yes--well, sort up. I was driving up the road and I saw this raccoon and he was sitting up on the road and his little ears were moving, so I got out and picked him up. Can you help him?

Me: Ah...no, I'm sorry, we cannot treat rabies vectors. All we can do is euthanize them.

Caller: What? Isn't there anywhere I can take him where they're not going to kill him?? He's okay, he just needs to be checked out. [B]I mean, he's sitting here on my lap growling at me while I'm driving on I-270, so I know he's going to be okay.

:eek:

threedogpack
Jun. 18, 2010, 03:37 PM
Skunks are the second highest vector species in PA for rabies (behind 'coons). That *alone* would be enough for me to make my house and/or property less attractive to them. Combine that with the odor and potential for spraying....and they would be gone one way or another. I would not be waiting for them to leave but would somehow encourage them to leave.....I would not leave food out for my domestic pets that would be attractive to them and I would be inclined to have them disposed of by either trapping or shooting.

Glad it's not my problem, I had one dog sprayed once and that was enough for me.

threedogpack
Jun. 18, 2010, 03:41 PM
Caller: What? Isn't there anywhere I can take him where they're not going to kill him?? He's okay, he just needs to be checked out. I mean, he's sitting here on my lap growling at me while I'm driving on I-270, so I know he's going to be okay.

:eek:[/QUOTE]

Holy moley! This caller was not at the top of the food chain was s/he?????

Sing Mia Song
Jun. 18, 2010, 05:13 PM
She was not. After safely arriving at our practice and our removing said growling raccoon from her car (via a rabies pole, thankyouverymuch), she continued to demonstrate Darwin Award Winning qualities.

Clueless: Could I get vaccinated for rabies?

Me: Well, sure. But it would be a special vaccine, not something you would get routinely. We are all vaccinated because we work in a high-risk profession. But unless you work in a vet hospital or something like that, it might be difficult to get.

Clueless: But I do work in a vet's office.

Me: You do? [And you don't know how rabies is transmitted or what animals are likely to be vectors?]

Clueless: Yes, I'm a dog groomer.

Me: Oh. Well, you would know if you had been vaccinated for rabies. It's not something you can get just at your annual physical. We had to coordinate withe the county board of health.

Clueless: Oh.

[Pause]

I'm supposed to work tomorrow. Is there any risk that I could give anything to the dogs?

Me: Um, do you mean could you infect them with rabies?

Clueless: Yeah.

Me: Not unless you bite them.

The following morning, I took the carcass of the raccoon to the state path lab and walked in saying, "What until you hear this one!"

Sad to say, the racoon was negative. If she'd just left the poor thing alone, it would have been just fine. He had just been rolled by a car and was momentarily stunned.

threedogpack
Jun. 18, 2010, 07:16 PM
She was not. After safely arriving at our practice and our removing said growling raccoon from her car (via a rabies pole, thankyouverymuch), she continued to demonstrate Darwin Award Winning qualities.

Clueless: Could I get vaccinated for rabies?

Me: Well, sure. But it would be a special vaccine, not something you would get routinely. We are all vaccinated because we work in a high-risk profession. But unless you work in a vet hospital or something like that, it might be difficult to get.

Clueless: But I do work in a vet's office.

Me: You do? [And you don't know how rabies is transmitted or what animals are likely to be vectors?]

Clueless: Yes, I'm a dog groomer.

Me: Oh. Well, you would know if you had been vaccinated for rabies. It's not something you can get just at your annual physical. We had to coordinate withe the county board of health.

Clueless: Oh.

[Pause]

I'm supposed to work tomorrow. Is there any risk that I could give anything to the dogs?

Me: Um, do you mean could you infect them with rabies?

Clueless: Yeah.

Me: Not unless you bite them.

The following morning, I took the carcass of the raccoon to the state path lab and walked in saying, "What until you hear this one!"

Sad to say, the racoon was negative. If she'd just left the poor thing alone, it would have been just fine. He had just been rolled by a car and was momentarily stunned.

*blink*

wow. just wow.

poor coon, another good reason to make sure wildlife stays...wild.

MsM
Jun. 18, 2010, 07:39 PM
I do know of a skunk to livestock incident in New York State about 15 years ago.
It was a dairy farm and the heifers were agitated so the farm owner walked over to the pen and saw them milling around a skunk in their pen. He saw one heifer put its head down to look at it and the skunk lunged and bit her on the nose! He got his gun and by then the skunk was wandering drunkenly by the roadside. When he could get a safe shot, he killed it and called the authorities.
Fortunately the local officials were insistent that the skunk be tested and it was found to be rabid. They also required that the heifer known to be bitten be put down and disposed of (couldnt test her-too soon after exposure) and all the other heifers were quarantined. I think they were isolated with precautions against human contact for 30 days as they were unsure about incubation.
It was very fortunate that it was the heifers who were quite separate from the milking herd. Going through that with the milkers would have ruined him.

Oldenburg Mom
Jun. 18, 2010, 08:02 PM
No food is left out for the animals. It's probably the grubs in the lawn.

I am going to have to get rid of them because of the rabies issue. Do I think they are currently rabid. No. But, I did check our the VA DOH (I'm sooo tempted to make a Homer Simpson comment... ) and yes, the two highest carriers—by a long shot—are raccoons (first) and skunks (second.) Link. (http://www.vdh.state.va.us/epidemiology/DEE/Rabies/statistics.htm#rabies)

I do note, however, only two deaths in VA in a number of years: 2003 (1) and 1998 (1). Plus zero cases of rabies in Orange County. At least reported cases.

Thanks for all the advice.

Now, how in the dickens am I going to get rid of them. *sigh*

threedogpack
Jun. 18, 2010, 08:32 PM
trapping is sure fire to know you moved them.

rumor has it around our neighborhood that straight ammonia poured where they enter/exit their burrow(if it's concrete) will burn their feet so they don't come back. Neighbor did that for a family of skunks under the garage and they left but there is no way to determine if they were ready to move on anyway. *shrug*

good luck, I don't envy you!

columbus
Jun. 20, 2010, 01:09 AM
I lived in Minneapolis just acrss the river from downtown and we have a lot of wildlife in the city including skunks. The skunk families usually lived under the garage slabs and for the most part you never know they are there until early summer when they weaned their first litter. The adult skunks co-exist with all of us and our pets but for the first few weeks the wandering youngsters get surprised and spray whatever comes around a corner too quickly. I was threatened while walking my dog who eveidently did not consider such a civilized animal to be vermin...like squirrels...and we would walk right buy them in the dark. I did have a skunk stomp its feet at me once and I felt very lucky that it considered me "scared away" and didn't spray.

My neighbors more rambunctious Golden got sprayed a couple of times in the years they lived there and that was horrible...right under my air conditioner. I work the evening shift so my day ending dog walk was after midnight and I saw lots of animals people never knew were there in the numbers they were. I saw a giant rotund skunk stop and wait for traffic to pass and then swing his portly behind across the street. It could be mistaken for a Very BIG furry Persian kitty in the dark.

I would ignore them and see how things go. Maybe the barn was quiet when she chose the spot this spring but if it is more active now she might choose another spot for her 2nd litter. When the babies scatter at weaning accidents might happen but just be careful not to go round the corners without a peak first. I might be careful to have a walkout board on any water tanks.

I had three half grown red fox kits in my pasture yesterday and I have a very large barn cat but I am worried he will be ganged up on...as if you have 3 youngsters you have at least 5 local foxes. Nevertheless I love the wild life.

There are may companies that trap skunks if you must. PatO

MMacallister
Jun. 20, 2010, 03:42 PM
I had skunks dig dens IN MY STALL!!! It really freaked me out when I went out to do the stalls and found a skunk. We tried trapping it with cat food, with no luck. We thought about trying to lure it out and shooting it but were afraid it would spray inside the barn.
So we put the hose into one of the holes and turned it on, I have no idea how much water we put down there but we left it on for 15 - 20 min.
The skunks moved to a bank on the edge of the pasture and I was very happy there were out of the barn.

maunder
Jun. 20, 2010, 03:52 PM
Years ago I worked at a farm where a skunk family moved in under raised stalls and two of the horses became infected with EPM. The mare directly over the skunk nest died with her unborn foal. My gelding who was a two old at the time (and not mine yet) had to be put down at age five.

Skunks can be carriers just like o'possums. The skunks in the story were not threatening and the female was allowed to have her children and she left when they were weaned.

We didn't learn of the danger of EPM until it was too late.

Oldenburg Mom
Jul. 3, 2010, 06:14 AM
More good news, bad news.

THE SKUNKS ARE GONE!

The goundhog is back.

I could just cry.

WaningMoon
Jul. 3, 2010, 07:21 AM
I do know of a skunk to livestock incident in New York State about 15 years ago.
It was a dairy farm and the heifers were agitated so the farm owner walked over to the pen and saw them milling around a skunk in their pen. He saw one heifer put its head down to look at it and the skunk lunged and bit her on the nose! He got his gun and by then the skunk was wandering drunkenly by the roadside. When he could get a safe shot, he killed it and called the authorities.
Fortunately the local officials were insistent that the skunk be tested and it was found to be rabid. They also required that the heifer known to be bitten be put down and disposed of (couldnt test her-too soon after exposure) and all the other heifers were quarantined. I think they were isolated with precautions against human contact for 30 days as they were unsure about incubation.
It was very fortunate that it was the heifers who were quite separate from the milking herd. Going through that with the milkers would have ruined him.

We have had several cows get rabies here this last yr. Three cows in one herd. There were 21 ppl who had bought raw milk from one of the cows. The three cows were put down but none were quarantined and milk continued to be shipped. The ppl who drank the milk were advised to contact their doctors to see if shots were recommended but the CDC said there has never been a case of rabies contracted through milk. I believe there were two more farms with a rabid cow and in each case a coon was blamed who had been seen around the barn in teh previous week or so.http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/tags/vermont/

BigRuss1996
Jul. 3, 2010, 07:31 AM
I had a pet skunk for many years. Got him from a pet store as baby and he was "de-skunked." They do make awesome pets if you get them as babies and handle them daily. Mine also got vaccinated every year along with the dogs, etc.
Wild skunks are sadly rabies carriers and many people kill them for that reason alone.