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ProzacPuppy
Jun. 15, 2010, 09:14 AM
I was wondering how one feeds two horses when they share the same paddock and there is no barn or other field etc that one could be moved into.

And one of the horses is a Pig with a capital P.

SMF11
Jun. 15, 2010, 09:20 AM
Probably the easiest way is with a feedbag.

I don't use them only because I haven't had to. I feed multiple horses in the field. Always feed the alpha first (or he'll be trying to steal the others' food) and continue in the pecking order. If they get about the same amount of feed, just space them far apart, and if they finish at about the same time, that's perfect.

If you have a lower-ranking horse that gets more food/finishes later, if your set-up allows you could feed it on the other side of the fenceline. My property is perimeter fenced, so I can do this (and do).

If you can't then try a feedbag. I did get one at my local feedstore, but it doesn't fit on any of my horses (their heads are too long). So make sure it can fit the horse in question.

BelladonnaLily
Jun. 15, 2010, 09:25 AM
A friend of ours leaves baling twine and snaps at intervals along the fence with fence feeders, throws halters on and hooks them up until they are done. Of course, that only works if they will stand tied quietly. At my house, I normally don't have more than 2 or 3 in each pasture, so we just stand guard. Most of mine don't get fed, so we just have to keep everyone else away from whoever is eating. They learned pretty fast that they aren't allowed...but it can be exhausting and I wouldn't recommend it if you have a particularly nasty horse in the pasture.

RougeEmpire
Jun. 15, 2010, 09:56 AM
always feed the invisible horse, to two. 5 horses? put out hay and grain pans for 6 or even 7. so on and so forth, It allows for rotation with less squabbles.

To the MAX
Jun. 15, 2010, 10:03 AM
At a barn I worked at the horses got tied to the fenceline while they ate, obviously starting with the most alpha horse and working down the pecking order. They all stayed tied until the last horse finished his meal.

Zu Zu
Jun. 15, 2010, 10:16 AM
I second the plan of feeding the "invisible" horse ~ that method works for mine when they are "mixing it up" ~ SPREAD out the feeders and add an extra two ~ and stand there and supervise and or pick their paddock while they are eating ~ they behave better when they know "MOM" is watching. Generally when they get into the routine things will smooth out or easy peasy solution = tie up the "PIG" til everyone else is done.

carolprudm
Jun. 15, 2010, 10:32 AM
http://www.futurityprecise.com/1103_HoofHealth_Tub.php

DiablosHalo
Jun. 15, 2010, 10:46 AM
I use both methods depending on the field...

Tie the quiet ones to the fence while they eat. I use a trailer bungee that will fray slowly and not snap - in case they act up and come unglued. (we're talkin oldies but goodies here- so it hasn't happened yet but just in case!).

For the fields of babies- I use the invisible horse method! I put 2-3 extra buckets out- that way the downer always has a bucket to pick from.

katarine
Jun. 15, 2010, 10:52 AM
leave buckets out there. let's say they are red and green.

put the buckets at least 20' apart. Time will tell how far apart they have to be so pig doesn't fuss.

establish whose bucket belongs to whom by feeding pig a treat in the red bucket, then sweetboy a treat in green bucket.

repeat til they get it.

Do not change this up.

Feed the alpha horse first in the red bucket.Always.

If they eat at the same speed, just always feed alpha first and fast- don't wander in there and goof off. Get in there drop feed for pig in red bucket and move- go to the green bucket, now. dump feed.

If they eat at different speeds, you may need that red bucket to be a big flat feeder with big rocks in it to slow the pig. And you may need to tinker with sweetboy's feed to get his food in him, before pig gets over there. I slow my pig with a ration of alfalfa cubes to slow her down, while sweetboy gets a fat ration of sunflower seeds to up his fat intake.

done.

PS unless you can ALWAYS do it, don't let anyone else feed with you to 'help'. I feed 5 and a donkey all out together in assigned bowls in a certain order and rhythm...but I'm a machine about feed this one here then that one, THEN that one, etc...if my DH tries to help they are quite confused because it's all out of order and he'll try to stop and pet one. OMG No keep moving LOL. Horses need routines and don't like them to be upset.

Aggie4Bar
Jun. 15, 2010, 10:57 AM
As others have said, feed the alpha first and, if possible, tie them till done. Otherwise, you may have to stand there, armed with a long whip, trying to enforce the rules of separation. Pick a place to feed each horse and do not alter the routine or move the feeders. Feed in the same place and in the same order every time.

My nutty TB mare would not tie, and she was aggressively alpha over my WB mare. TB was a hard keeper, so it took her longer to eat than my airfern WB. WB never bothered the TB and would simply walk to the hay pile when her food was gone. About once a week, the TB would leave her food to try to steal from the WB's bucket - or rather, she'd spill it and stomp it into the dirt before returning to her own - so someone had to stand guard. Their buckets are nailed to trees, so they don't move. Prior to that, if the TB's bucket moved half an inch, she couldn't find it, and all hell would break loose. Moral of the story: Adopt a routine and don't change it!

goeslikestink
Jun. 15, 2010, 10:59 AM
feed them seperately and tie them up to a bit of bailing twine somewhere or
place the feeds a good few feet apart then once they are sorted put a halter on the piggy horse and hold on to him via alead rein till the other horse has finished his dinner before you let piggy horse of the lead collect both feed bowls to the gateway - then let piggy off so no ones fighting biting etc
if feeding hay then do 3 piles of hay to 2 horses and amke sure theres a good distance between each pile so no kicking this way the extra pile the horse can move about with out bothering each other and they get there fair share

wsmoak
Jun. 15, 2010, 11:47 AM
I saw one setup with a long flat trough and standing stalls in front of it in a corner of the pasture. Everybody would line up in their assigned stall (eventually!) and eat. Not sure they even had to be tied by the time I saw it, but they could be, or have a butt bar put up behind. Basically like standing in a 2-horse trailer with a manger.

Piatt Farms
Jun. 15, 2010, 03:25 PM
I agree with everyone here, with one word of caution....if you opt to tie them, insure you tie them to something sturdy. (REALLY sturdy)

I routinely tied my alpha (pig) mare to the fence while my other two ate quietly and assumed that since the company had said it could withstand 2500lbs of horse it would hold her 1000lb body. I believed this until one evening I came out to untie her (15 min later) and found her still tied to the fence post, but the fence post was now 10 feet away from where it had previously been...cement block and all.

DH quickly installed a new steel hitching post cemented 15" in. Damn horse.

mlranchtx
Jun. 15, 2010, 05:53 PM
Feedbags:

http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=00189ea0-b0a0-4b0b-bd1b-899d0797ecca

Greatest invention since velcro.

columbus
Jun. 15, 2010, 06:29 PM
I use gates. Horses that get about the same amount and the same kind are fed on opposite sides of the same feeder. The submissive and those who get a lot more are through a gate in another paddock. I can do five areas with 4 feeders and each feeder has 2 sides. This is by design. When I started I broke up the sacrifice area into parts that attach to the barn so I could control all the horses without having to catch tie or lead anyone if necessary...I just open a gate or door and manage them that way. Always put the dominant or least domonant horse where it needs to be first. In my case it is the least dominant horse that needs to be settled first as I have 4 who play at dominance all the time, If they dont have anyone to push around it is peaceful.. Also I feed Progressive which is a small amount so they finish fast. No one gets more than 2 pounds. I also have one stall with a door into a paddock that I can use as another paddock. Hay is mostly in small hole hay bags and I have the same number as I have horses as they tend to pick at it through the day instead of eating all at once. Really feeding Slow hay has taken a LOT of stress out of feeding time. PatO

camohn
Jun. 15, 2010, 07:14 PM
always feed the invisible horse, to two. 5 horses? put out hay and grain pans for 6 or even 7. so on and so forth, It allows for rotation with less squabbles.

ditto! and feed pans are spread 20' apart

ProzacPuppy
Jun. 16, 2010, 09:04 AM
Thanks. My alpha is the pig, the other is an older horse with not great teeth (despite dental care) so he eats slower. Will try all the choices and see which works best for these two.

NeedsAdvil
Jun. 16, 2010, 10:35 AM
Agree, feed the alpha pig first, always. It will take a few days for them to understand the routine, but once they do, life is a zillion times easier. Also, since your other horse eats slower, maybe add some filler to the alpha's feed, beet pulp comes to mind, to slow him down and keep him happy while the other has a chance to finish his feed.

eponacelt
Jun. 16, 2010, 01:02 PM
Feedbags. Hands down.

nextyear
Jun. 16, 2010, 03:02 PM
Most of your supply stores sell the round pen panels that are easy to put up for a feed pen that you can take down or move around as needed, we only needed 4 panels to make one so the cost was about $150.00.

FraggleRock
Jun. 16, 2010, 03:06 PM
stand there with a lunge whip. worked for me when ive had to feed a pig who inhales his feed and an older slow poke who ate more feed. piggie wouldnt think of touching older horse while i was standing there.

right now i have 5 horses all out together, i bring my mare in the barn or her grass paddock to eat by herself and shes super slow and eats the most. i seperate the other 4 in pairs (my paddocks are all open but i have connecting gates. luckily these 4 horses 2 eat 2 quarts of the same feed and the other two eat 2 cups of the same feed. so i just shoo 2 into one section, shut the gate and then i can feed all 4. i used to bring 3 in the barn and stand gaurd for the last 2 horses but then i got smart, saves me alot of time.

lorilu
Jun. 16, 2010, 08:30 PM
Around here round pen panels are 69 each.... where did you get four for 150??

I wet the feed for the pig/alpha, so it slows him down. He actually licks the pan! Round pans on the ground. On opposite sides of the field - pig far from the barn, sweetie by the barn.

Many TB farms here have small feeding stalls lined up along a fence. Horses learn to go in, a gate shuts behind them, they eat. A friend has a similar set up for her three horses, They all know thier feeding stall, and go right in and wait. Of course, alpha is fed first.
L

Tommy's Girl
Jun. 24, 2010, 12:19 PM
I have four in the pasture, and feed only three. I don't tie them - I manage them. The way I see it, it's a great opportunity to assert my alpha-ness. The first fed is the 1900lb Belgian (herd leader), then the other gelding, then the mare. The pony doesn't get any grain and the others wont share with her, so that manages itself. But when my Belgian piglet is done with his tiny bit of grain, I stop him from poaching the other's food by scratching his head, nuzzling his ears and not letting him take another step towards the others. No crop, no lead or halter... I just take a firm stance and push him back when he's being pushy. And honestly, being able to calmly and kindly take control of the feeding hierarchy has taught the big boy who's boss, and he respects me now.

ReSomething
Jun. 24, 2010, 06:31 PM
At a barn I worked at the horses got tied to the fenceline while they ate, obviously starting with the most alpha horse and working down the pecking order. They all stayed tied until the last horse finished his meal.

Pretty much the same way we do it only we tie to trees. We have to keep the pony out of the old guy's feed as that is how he gets his medication. We also have two portable panel pens that see a lot of use.

baysngreys
Jun. 25, 2010, 01:30 PM
We built "pens" into the fence line. Simply added a few posts and rails. Each pen is 2 fence sections long and wide (16' X 16') with a gate on the pasture side.

When they hear the golf cart coming they all trot up the hill and go into a pen. It's so easy to drive along the front and feed everyone.
I can close them in if I need them nearby for the shoer or to blanket or work with. we put mats at the front to feed hay in the winter and hang a water bucket in each pen.

If I can get them covered I'd have a "barn"!

ThirdCharm
Jun. 25, 2010, 05:53 PM
Feedbag costs $10. Two seconds to slip on and off when done, no construction required, no danger to other horses or facilities, no need to stand over them while they eat....

Jennifer

Kate66
Jun. 26, 2010, 12:39 AM
Feedbag costs $10. Two seconds to slip on and off when done, no construction required, no danger to other horses or facilities, no need to stand over them while they eat....

Jennifer

OK, so we are lazy. The only real hassle we found with feedbags, which we loved, were that some of the horses would wander away with them on if you didn't stand over them and wait until they were finished. Then they would try to graze with them on and you would have to trek across the field to recover them from them.

Now we just feed 2 in a long cow trough - they get fed the same so if they move about no issue and the other 2 in those Priefert hay/grain feeders on wooden posts. They know who owns what.

Chardavej
Jun. 26, 2010, 08:54 AM
We built feedstalls, they all come in and eat, and if we need to we can halter and tie one in. They all get the feed that only they should eat (have 5 different types of feeds and then the supplements). They're covered also and up against the barn so I can come out the feedroom door, and feed everyone from the front. We have a "deck" that is about 2 feet off the ground in front of them, so I can also look down their back lines and see if they are dropping weight or need to be cut back. It's the easist way, when you're ground level, sometimes it's not as obvious.

Plus with them being covered, they will all walk up at different times of the day and stand in there and snooze. They have thick woods to go in and a carport but also love to stand in the feedstalls.

Here are pics:

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Feed%20Stalls/Barnandfeedstalls005.jpg

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Feed%20Stalls/Barnandfeedstalls004.jpg

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Feed%20Stalls/Ginger002.jpg

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Farm%20for%20sale/AmericanSaddle038.jpg


I love this pic, but it also makes me sad, biggest horse in the barn next to the littlest horse in the barn. They have both passed away:

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Feed%20Stalls/Ginger001.jpg

"Mmmm! Nom nom's for ME!"

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Little%20Man/DSC_0067.jpg

mvp
Jun. 26, 2010, 07:24 PM
OK, so we are lazy. The only real hassle we found with feedbags, which we loved, were that some of the horses would wander away with them on if you didn't stand over them and wait until they were finished. Then they would try to graze with them on and you would have to trek across the field to recover them from them.

Now we just feed 2 in a long cow trough - they get fed the same so if they move about no issue and the other 2 in those Priefert hay/grain feeders on wooden posts. They know who owns what.

Yes, feedbags. I had no clue and was deeply impressed when I learned this technique recently from my current BO.

Oh, and the dumb-a$$ chow hound like mine that walks away and tries to graze? He did learn that coming to the gate for removal worked much better.

Of course this works best if you don't have acres and acres.

With multiple paddocks, my BO usually starts with the slowest-eating group then works here way up. By the time she's done with putting the last ones on, the first set of horses are done-- dutifully lined up by their gate.

It's a great system. Everyone puts their head down and eats, knowing they have theirs and can't get to anyone else's anyway. They the do tend to skank up their water if they decide to go for an after dinner drink. Otherwise, you just rinse these fine-meshed nylon things off.

baysngreys
Jun. 29, 2010, 02:37 PM
I would love to be able to use feedbags but I feed soaked beet pulp and flax. The buckets so heavy, poured into feedbags the poor horses wouldn't be able to lift their heads!

twofatponies
Jun. 29, 2010, 11:52 PM
At one point my older mare was in a rehab situation, turned out with four elderly mares. None of them got grain, just hay (easy keepers). So each feeding time my mare got brought out of the paddock, tied to a nearby post and given a feed pan. She's stay there tied until BO had finished the rest of his feeding rounds in the barn, then he'd come back out and put her back in the paddock. After a while he didn't even have to tie her - she'd just stay there by the feed pan until he came back.

Auventera Two
Jun. 30, 2010, 11:27 AM
My method is exactly what katarine said. Every horse has THEIR bucket and THEIR spot. It is never changed. Order of feeding is never changed. Everybody knows the drill and they go immediately to where their bucket will appear. You can't willy nilly it and one day put the bucket here and the next day give them a green bucket over by the water tank. It has to always be exactly the same.

I mix feed in each bucket in the feed room, then carry the buckets out in a stack. Pink bucket is dropped HERE for alpha horse. Purple bucket immediately dropped 20 feet away THERE for subordinate horse. Alpha/pig/vacuum cleaner horse's bucket contains a large smooth stone.

Go to next pasture and drop another pink bucket HERE for that alpha. Drop purple bucket THERE for that subordinate. In that pasture, the two mares eat at exactly the same speed so alpha doesn't get more than subordinate gets.

In winter when I feed lots of soaked beet pulp, everybody is in individual stalls for the night so certain horses can get more hay and more beet pulp plus extras. Feeding them outside in groups in the winter would be impossible because they are so different in terms of metabolism and tendencies.

sublimequine
Jun. 30, 2010, 03:17 PM
We built feedstalls, they all come in and eat, and if we need to we can halter and tie one in. They all get the feed that only they should eat (have 5 different types of feeds and then the supplements). They're covered also and up against the barn so I can come out the feedroom door, and feed everyone from the front. We have a "deck" that is about 2 feet off the ground in front of them, so I can also look down their back lines and see if they are dropping weight or need to be cut back. It's the easist way, when you're ground level, sometimes it's not as obvious.

Plus with them being covered, they will all walk up at different times of the day and stand in there and snooze. They have thick woods to go in and a carport but also love to stand in the feedstalls.

Here are pics:

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Feed%20Stalls/Barnandfeedstalls005.jpg

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Feed%20Stalls/Barnandfeedstalls004.jpg

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Feed%20Stalls/Ginger002.jpg

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Farm%20for%20sale/AmericanSaddle038.jpg


I love this pic, but it also makes me sad, biggest horse in the barn next to the littlest horse in the barn. They have both passed away:

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Feed%20Stalls/Ginger001.jpg

"Mmmm! Nom nom's for ME!"

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e28/chardavej/Little%20Man/DSC_0067.jpg

That's such a neat design, but don't they all try and back out and get into another stall if they finished before their neighbor?

BeastieSlave
Jun. 30, 2010, 03:45 PM
I love my feedbags!

I can manage feeding two horses in the pasture at the same time. For mine, it was just a matter of ensuring that the alpha horse didn't finish up first. That usually meant extra oats or other 'filler' to keep the horse busy.

HOWEVER, a feedbag is a really beautiful thing for that horse who's a hard keeper, has not so great teeth and drops a lot of feed, or gets pushed around by a bully (or is all of these things). I'm using feed bags for two of mine because they can't walk away from their feed but they can walk away with their feed! One takes forever and there's no way the air fern companion can keep eating for the same length of time and not turn into a blimp and the other is old and wastes a lot otherwise.

I don't think I could tie my gang to eat. I've got a couple squirrels that would get into trouble and I really like them eating on the ground anyway.


I would love to be able to use feedbags but I feed soaked beet pulp and flax. The buckets so heavy, poured into feedbags the poor horses wouldn't be able to lift their heads!
You might be surprised... Mine tend to keep their feed bags on the ground and only move (pick their heads up) when another horse comes along.

kookicat
Jun. 30, 2010, 06:59 PM
I only have two at the moment, but if I'm feeding them while turned out, the buckets get hung on the fence and they're tied to the posts. (I have two of them at either sides of the gate that are bigger than the rest and more firmly planted. Tie ring on the side and a short trailer tie makes it easy to hook them up and feed.)

Quin
Jul. 3, 2010, 02:28 AM
We actually feed in the barn but the horses' area is more like a run-in shed. So we halter & tie at the feed buckets. Of course always the same positions! Once tied, we used to feed the Old Geezer (RIP) first simply because he got triple the grain and took 5 times as long as the others, then alpha (only) mare, then one gelding, then ended with alpha gelding air fern. They finished in reverse order but alpha gelding was very good about standing tied for an hour if need be. The other gelding gets tied on a VERY short rope after the evening when he decided to scritch his ear with his hind leg (idiot horse!) and managed to get his back foot OVER the lead rope. Never had a moment's trouble with anybody else.

For the hay feeders in the wintertime, definitely at least 1 more position than horses, so the least dominant can always move on and still get something to munch on.

JackandMo
Jul. 4, 2010, 05:22 PM
Since all of our fencing is wood, our barn owner built pens along the fence line with a rope and snap to secure them in.

The alpha horses get penned so that the others can eat in peace.

We don't just throw feed - each horse has a specific diet. It's imperative that they get what they need.

I'll take photos tonight and post to show what I'm talking about.

tuckawayfarm
Jul. 4, 2010, 05:41 PM
Feedbags :yes:

I like the Cashel ones.

I fed with rubber tubs for years, but the amount of expensive ration balancer that ended up in the mud when the tubs were pawed over by my youngsters made me crazy (and poor). There is no waste with the bags, you can be sure everyone gets their meds and supplements, and you know right away if someone isn't finishing their grain.

I use them on everyone from weanlings to retirees and they learned very quickly to line up at the gate to have them put on and removed. There is no shuffling from pan to pan or bullying. My barnhelp love them too. :)

Chardavej
Jul. 8, 2010, 02:48 PM
That's such a neat design, but don't they all try and back out and get into another stall if they finished before their neighbor?

Not really, they usually back out and wander off, get a drink of water and go back to the pasture or round bale. Some will go to an empty stall to see if they can hoover any crumbs that might be left or stand patiently behind someone waiting for them to finish. Push and the horse in the stall will lift a rear foot in warning and they go back to waiting quietly.

EventerAJ
Jul. 10, 2010, 02:44 PM
We have 7 or 8 geldings that live out 24/7 in a large (10+ac) field. Mr. Old Skinny takes up to 45min to eat his large portion, while the hoover air ferns suck up their ration balancer in two bites. I have way too much to do to babysit all of them for two hours a day!

We tie them to the fence. They all know how to cross-tie and straight-tie anyway. We tie to fence posts; some with simple twine/snap (old & trustworthy guys) others with Blocker tie rings and lead ropes (those that try to break free). The horses stay tied until Mr. Old Skinny is done eating. That could be 20 minutes, or an hour. I've left them as long as 3 hrs under special circumstances (vet emergency).

They do have a very specific order, alpha horse first. They usually line up in that way on their own... even when the alpha is slow to come up, each horse knows his particular feed tub and waits there.

Even young ones (2 y/os) learn to stand patiently and quietly. When introducing a new horse, I will supervise them for a few days, making sure he doesn't try to get loose. They mimic each other pretty well, dropping a hip and taking a nap until it's time to untie everyone. One horse had a bad habit of pawing, so we placed a 4x6' rubber mat at his feeder to avoid craters. It doesn't take long for them to learn that pawing and other antics won't bring freedom any sooner.

I find the daily ritual of tying is GREAT for them. They understand the concept of "patience," staying still, and entertaining themselves in a stationary position. It's very helpful when tying to the trailer at shows. :)

GraceLikeRain
Jul. 12, 2010, 12:38 AM
separate feeding.


My fat mare currently gets her neighbors feed because management won't put in the effort. Unfortunately, high-energy pigs have no problem cantering across a pasture to steal a pasturemates dinner.

Simbalism
Jul. 12, 2010, 12:56 AM
At the farm where I board, they do a variety of methods. The horses at the barn are primarily hunter or dressage types, so not many tie. They have bucket hooks and rings at each feed station along the fence. If they need to tie a horse, they attach a trailer tie at the spot and put horse's halter on. For the pain in the butt non-tier's they have done round pen panel "stalls". Most horse's seem to get it after awhile. My mare lives in a pasture with two older horses(mare and gelding). The gelding is the alpha, my mare is in the middle and other mare is bottom of pecking order. The gelding gets the most feed, my horse next and other mare less feed. With just a little directing(gelding gets fed first), then my mare and finally other mare, they are pretty good about staying at their own places.