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raave05
Jun. 3, 2010, 12:30 PM
Hello -

My barn manager got a really good deal on Adequan from the vet (i guess there is such a thing as bulk discount), and it has finally made it affordable for me to give it a shot.

So I have 2 questions:

1. Is there a difference between giving Adequan IM vs IV. The recommendations is IM, but the barn managers has always done IV. Not sure if there are medical reasons for the IM recommendation or not.

2. Will the Adequan be useful at all if I don't do the loading dose? Can a horse simply be put on the once a month maintenance dose or is that really just pointless without a loading cycle.

Thanks in advance.

Laurierace
Jun. 3, 2010, 12:39 PM
It won't hurt anything to only give it once a month without the loading dose but it most likely won't help either. I can not think of one single reason why you would give it IV.

scribbles
Jun. 3, 2010, 12:44 PM
we have always given it im, i have never heard of anyone giving it iv before.

BuddyRoo
Jun. 3, 2010, 12:47 PM
I've only heard of giving Adequan IM or IA. If you go to their product website, that's all i see referenced as well.

http://www.luitpold.com/animal_health/trade/pdf/equine/equine_faqs.pdf

Do you think that someone maybe misunderstood?

BrightandClear
Jun. 3, 2010, 01:01 PM
It won't hurt anything to only give it once a month without the loading dose but it most likely won't help either..

Why not? (Not trying to be argumentative, just curious.)

Laurierace
Jun. 3, 2010, 01:04 PM
Because research has shown that the loading dose is needed in order for the drug to do its job. I don't know the mechanism of how the drug does its job but I believe there is more to it than the company wanting us to buy 7 doses instead of one. If one did the trick everyone would be shouting that from the rooftops telling people not to waste their money on the loading dose.

EqTrainer
Jun. 3, 2010, 03:24 PM
This is NOT an IV drug. Your BM must be thinking of Legends.

sublimequine
Jun. 3, 2010, 03:31 PM
This is NOT an IV drug. Your BM must be thinking of Legends.

:yes:

qhfan2
Jun. 3, 2010, 03:51 PM
I've never heard of Adequan IV before either. I've used it in the past on an older gelding who is no longer with us. I did the loading dose twice over a span of about 2 years. The initial loading dose worked well and I continued with a one mo. shot. I will admit, the one month turned into 6 weeks (roughly) and I ended up doing a 2nd loading dose several months after the first one. If I were to do it again, I would do the loading dose initially and feel if I only started with the one shot/month, I would be wasting my $$.

raave05
Jun. 3, 2010, 05:01 PM
thanks for the responses. it definitely caught me a little off gaurd and sounded strange, but I didn't know if anyone had heard of doing it IV before.

looks like i'll be sticking to my gut.

GatoGordo
Jun. 3, 2010, 07:06 PM
Actually, a vet friend of mine has done it IV, so it's not 100% off the wall, but even she tells people to give it IM.

JB
Jun. 3, 2010, 09:20 PM
the 7 day loading dose was what was tested to have the most uptake into the cartilage which is where it's targeted.

that's why the loading dose ;)

workinggirl
Jun. 3, 2010, 10:16 PM
OK, so after the loading dose, is 1 per month adequate? Is this stated by the company? Or if not 1 x per month what do you do?

asterix
Jun. 3, 2010, 10:28 PM
I think the company suggests just doing the loading dose, but whether this is because it's what's been tested or because of the biochemistry, I'm not sure.
Vets I've spoken to have suggested mostly doing the loading dose, doing a dose in a week when you have a big competition, and repeating the loading dose (so, rather than 1x a month for 6 months, do a loading dose, wait several months, do another loading dose).
Opinions vary, though!

Dressage.For.Life.
Jun. 3, 2010, 11:13 PM
The only thing that has been tested and proven to be helpful is the loading dose. Vets don't really know what to recommend as far as how often to give as the information simply isn't out there.

Some people swear by doing one shot each month and say that that's what has helped their horse. Some people do one shot every other week. Some people do one of the above along with the loading dose once every year. I've heard of some vets suggesting to try the loading dose and then simply doing the loading dose again when needed (or loading dose 2x a year / every six months) as it is proven to do something.

I've seen Adequan given IV but it's most commonly done IM.

FEI1Day
Jun. 4, 2010, 12:00 AM
I do the loading dose quarterly but my horse is a 20 yr. old GP schoolmaster. At a minimum, I would do it twice a year. I do not do the monthly shot, only the full series of 7. While I give Adequan IM, my vet will "boost" with Adequan IV just prior to a competition but this is done in addition to the 7 series twice a year.

JB
Jun. 4, 2010, 07:51 AM
OK, so after the loading dose, is 1 per month adequate? Is this stated by the company? Or if not 1 x per month what do you do?

Entirely depends on your horse.

there are folks who tell you they can feel the difference after 3-4 weeks, so give another shot.

Others do the loading dose twice a year.

There is no research on maintenance for this, so you have to do what works best for that horse.

Iride
Oct. 4, 2010, 12:37 PM
I can't remember where but I saw an article citing a study that found that once the loading dose is completed, only weekly Adequan will provide any continual benefit to the horse... and, they found that once a month does nothing. I will search around to see if I can find the study info.

As for the reason some people choose to inject Adequan IV instead of IM... some people feel that needles in the neck muscle makes a horse's neck sore (not out of the realm of possibility... I imagine that a large needle sunk into anyone's muscle could to lead to some soreness) and so they choose to give it in the vein (less soreness effect).

That said, speaking for myself, I have never given it IV, nor am I sure it has the same efficacy when injected that way vs. in the muscle.

forward ride
Oct. 4, 2010, 01:27 PM
I think the company suggests just doing the loading dose, but whether this is because it's what's been tested or because of the biochemistry, I'm not sure.
Vets I've spoken to have suggested mostly doing the loading dose, doing a dose in a week when you have a big competition, and repeating the loading dose (so, rather than 1x a month for 6 months, do a loading dose, wait several months, do another loading dose).
Opinions vary, though!

This is what I do. Then I end up doing a loading dose about 2x a year. This is on a 17 yo TB who still competes in upper level jumpers though. I definitely notice a difference after he has the 1 shot and about halfway through the loading dose.

I don't believe the label indicates anything other than a loading dose though.

aucowwy
Oct. 4, 2010, 09:58 PM
I used Adequin twice a year IM. Once when the weather got cold and again when it got hot. My old horse was arthritic and the weather change bothered him, one inj helped him get through the month of weather change.

deltawave
Oct. 4, 2010, 10:30 PM
In lieu of "sticking with your gut", it's usually better when talking about pharmaceuticals to stick with evidence-based guidelines, the product's approved dosing schedule, or your veterinarian's advice. :)

pattir7
Oct. 4, 2010, 10:46 PM
While I don't doubt people's experience...or the research.. I saw NO difference with Adequan. I did the loading dose.. and saw nothing. I continued with it once/month.. and saw nothing.

A friend of mine told me about Polyglycan. It is the same cost/dose as Adequan...roughly half the cost of Legend. The vet was there for fall shots so I decided to give it 'a go'.

Wow. Keep in mind, I was not trying to fix a problem.. but what I saw after the Polyglycan, I swear, made him look/feel like he was working in sneakers.

I know it's not FDA approved for such use.. but so, so many people use it.. and I, personally, don't need the FDA to tell me what I can see with my own eyes. My own vet can't keep the stuff stocked....people love it so much.

I recently saw on thehorse.com that there is now some research to support it.. but it is still not FDA approved for such use. Maybe it will be someday... cause, so far, it's the only thing I've tried that did anything visible.

davistina67
Oct. 5, 2010, 12:02 AM
IMHO, A vet is crazy to give Polyglycan. It is actually illegal for a vet to give it. Not only can a vet loose their license for giving it but they can be sued too. I know some people that have used it and have had some very adverse reactions.

qhwpmare
Oct. 5, 2010, 07:53 AM
My horse was a new man after Polyglycan injections with no adverse reactions.:)

BoyleHeightsKid
Oct. 5, 2010, 01:39 PM
FWIW...my vet says that polyglycan is just adequan and legend together in the same bottle... So if adequan is not working for your horse Legend might as they are to target different areas.

davistina67
Oct. 5, 2010, 03:57 PM
Boyleheightskid...... In a nut shell your vet is correct. But... why would you give something to an animal you care about that is not to be injected into a horse? It just doesn't make any sense to me that people are injecting things in their horses that they are specifically not to.

JB
Oct. 5, 2010, 05:22 PM
Is it that polyglycan *should not* be injected like that, or just that it's not FDA-approved and labeled for that use?

I ask because there are many things that are used off-label which are safe to do.

davistina67
Oct. 5, 2010, 05:30 PM
My understanding is poly is not to b injected into the blood stream.

Leather
Oct. 5, 2010, 05:32 PM
Is it that polyglycan *should not* be injected like that, or just that it's not FDA-approved and labeled for that use?


The "polyglycan" often used as a substitute for Adequan isn't approved as a drug at all. It's classified by the FDA as a medical device for joint lavage during surgery.

So there is no ADME (aborbtion, distribution, metabolism, excretion) information on polyglycan.

In other words, no performance data on polyglycan as a drug.

JB
Oct. 5, 2010, 05:44 PM
Ok, so it's not that it's known to be dangerous to inject, but that there is no proof (due to lack of study) that it IS safe to do so. Just curious :)

Iride
Oct. 5, 2010, 06:07 PM
Every vet I know on the racetrack is using polyglycan. I can't think of a single "adverse reaction" to it in my experience with it there over the last 3 years. Also, most vets who do use it report great results. As for it being a combination of Adequan and Legend, well, not exactly... it's effects may be similar (or better) but the contents are not literally Adequan and Legend... but it is, as another poster stated below, classified as a surgical joint lavage. Also - yes it IS injected into the vein, NOT the muscle.

davistina67
Oct. 5, 2010, 07:15 PM
I may get flogged for this but I must say, in general, but not all race track vets are not exactly known for their ethics!

The two people that I know that tried it, tried it on reining horses. Both trainers are well known in North American and know horses. Each of them had a horse that reacted strangely. If I recall correctly, Poly is somewhat like Condroprotect which is what a lot of people refer to as generic Adequan in that it is not manufactured in a sterile environment and was never intending to be but into a horses blood stream. Anyone know for sure if it is sterile for the bloodstream in horses?

Pennywell Bay
Oct. 5, 2010, 08:14 PM
It is definitely sterile- it is used to replace synovia that is lost during surgery, but it is not intended for IV injection. One reason "may" be it is highly viscous ( or thick) like an oil. It is so thick due to the components that make it up and the delivery vehicle to make it effective in the joint.

davistina67
Oct. 5, 2010, 08:21 PM
Not sure I would inject "oil" into my horses blood even if it was sterile! I knew the condroprotect which people try to sell as generic adequan is not sterile but wasn't sure about poly. thanks!

Iride
Oct. 5, 2010, 08:26 PM
Not sure I would inject "oil" into my horses blood even if it was sterile!

It's not oil.

davistina67
Oct. 5, 2010, 08:41 PM
It's not oil.

Who said it was????

Leather
Oct. 5, 2010, 08:47 PM
I knew the condroprotect which people try to sell as generic adequan is not sterile

Chondroprotec is sterile. It's indicated for use as a wound dressing.

davistina67
Oct. 5, 2010, 08:50 PM
It is absolutely not sterile. It is meant as external dressing. Dressing products are typically not sterile. There is a huge differance between a dressing and an iv product.

Leather
Oct. 5, 2010, 08:59 PM
There is a huge differance between a dressing and an iv product.

Not arguing with you there.

But it is in fact sterile.

It is a sterile wound dressing.


CHONDROPROTEC® is a sterile 10 mL solution containing 1000 mg of polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

davistina67
Oct. 5, 2010, 09:07 PM
I went thru this this spring. Call the company, It is absoluelty not made in a sterile environment. Unless it change in the last 6 months. Wound dressings are not required to b sterile. I'm not arguing either! I just know the facts on this one!

Leather
Oct. 5, 2010, 09:14 PM
Interesting. The manufacturer states 3 times that the product is sterile:
http://www.hymed.com/chondrop.htm


Call the company, It is absoluelty not made in a sterile environment.

Did you ask if the product is sterile, or if it's made in a sterile environment?

Sterile products don't have to be made in sterile environments. They are sterilized post-manufacture.

Regardless, we both agree that it's not intended to be injected. ;)

davistina67
Oct. 5, 2010, 09:21 PM
Interesting..... To b injected into a horse, it needs to b made in a sterile enviro. Maybe thats where the confusion is!

Leather
Oct. 5, 2010, 09:42 PM
Interesting..... To b injected into a horse, it needs to b made in a sterile enviro. Maybe thats where the confusion is!

Not quite. Parenteral drugs can either be manufactured via aseptic technique (sterile manufacturing environment) or sterilized in the final container after manufacture to ensure sterility.

Since aseptic technique is very expensive, complicated and time consuming, the preference is terminal sterilization. The drugs that can't withstand a sterilization procedure are the ones manufactured via aseptic technique.

Medical devices can be "injected" as well. But it depends on the indication. Chondroprotec isn't indicated to be administered via injection.

Sorry for getting off track from the original discussion. :lol:

keepthelegend
Oct. 6, 2010, 02:08 PM
My Vet told me the loading dose is really all you need. The once a month doesn't do anything (according to him). I give the loading dose twice a year. Although sometimes before a vetting I give a shot of it out of the blue just in hope it will help the flexions out.

pattir7
Oct. 6, 2010, 04:34 PM
Ummm.. Polyglycan is not like ANYTHING else on the market for whatever purpose.. not chondro (whatever), Adequan, Legend, etc. Folks may 'argue' that it is *like* Adequan and Legend in one shot.. but even that is not true. Adequan is a PSGAG. Polysulfated Glucosamine in proprietary formulation. Chondro is also Polysulfated Glucosamine.. but it is not made the same way.. and the two are not the same.

Polyglycan is a HACSAG... N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine, Chondroitin Sulfate, and HA. I'm guessing the chondroitin is what makes it so viscous. But no, it is not oil...and not 'like' Adequan and Legend combined. You could maybe argue the HA component in both Legend and Polyglycan.. but the Chondroitin sulfate is not in either Legend or Adequan and the glucosamine formulation is different between Polyglycan and Adequan. So, not 'like' either.. or even both combined.

And.. for what it's worth, it ain't just race track vets that use it IV... and the fact that it is not 'FDA approved' for such use does NOT mean it is not safe to use. Read this:

http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=15757&src=fav

This is REAL research of Polyglycan used IV.. and it shows REAL promise. It sounds like it will be investigated further for this use. I sure hope it will be.. but regardless, I will continue to use it because it WORKS. My vet also thinks it is wonderful and people rave about it.. they can't keep it on the shelves. That wouldn't be happening if it didn't work or was 'unsafe'. Maybe Legend would work too...but why should I spend twice as much??

Odd that you would know two with 'reactions' to it?? You never said what kind of reaction.. and my vet (a large practice) has never had one.. nor have I ever read or heard of anyone having a reaction to it.

davistina67
Oct. 6, 2010, 11:36 PM
I am not for injecting experimental drugs into my horses. I am also really surprised that vets are giving this to people. There is no gray zone about something like this. A vet can easily loose their license for injecting it into a horse.

The one horse was extremely lethargic for about 36 hours after the injection. The other horse I do not recall what they said was wrong with it.

deltawave
Oct. 7, 2010, 08:40 AM
A vet can easily loose their license for injecting it into a horse.


Probably not. Vets and physicians use drugs off label ALL THE TIME. There is supposed to be a discussion and disclosure of risks, benefits, and alternatives, which I've personally never gotten from a vet unless I've initiated the discussion, but since I routinely do that on my own OR I've already done the requisite homework/reading on the topic, I'm comfortable with it.

I'll wait for good, solid data on the Polyglycan before using it. Don't have the need at the present time, and there are alternatives with the research behind them that I am personally more comfortable turning to. :yes:

Iride
Oct. 7, 2010, 08:52 AM
Probably not. Vets and physicians use drugs off label ALL THE TIME. . :yes:

Exactly. And with regard to polyglycan, just about every vet I know uses it...and not just track vets, all the h/j vets I know use it. If they were all to lose their license, which they won't, we won't have any vets in the area, lol. :yes:

JB
Oct. 7, 2010, 09:19 AM
And that was exactly the point of my question - what is the reason for all the horror about using it. It's one thing for it to simply be off-label, even without studies to prove it IS safe, vs there being evidence it's not safe and still being used.

davistina67
Oct. 7, 2010, 10:43 AM
My brother is a vet. In Colorado it is very very clear about this, I believe most states have the same law.

"Unless there is a lifethreating condition that the horse may die, you can not use or administer any off label products if there is a labeled product that gives like results." If vets are out there giving this stuff I would be afraid that they not only know their own law for their profession but they may not be up to date on other things also.

Think about it, by saying vets can use anything they want is making them chemists. Anything thing that is not labeled for a horse is off label. Meaning, it is all a big gamble. I am pretty certain peanut butter isn't labeled for injection into a horse but hey, let's use it under off label and inject it anyway and see what happens!

Leather
Oct. 7, 2010, 11:17 AM
In Colorado it is very very clear about this, I believe most states have the same law.


It's actually a federal law.

http://www.avma.org/reference/amduca/extralabel_brochure.pdf

It gets complicated in the case of polyglycan/chondroprotec because they're not drugs, so people could try to argue they don't apply.

I'd be curious to hear the FDA's read on the situation.

pattir7
Oct. 7, 2010, 11:27 AM
Has anyone even read the article I posted about the study done by David Frisbie, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVS, of Colorado State University?

Here... so you don't have to go elsewhere (hope it's ok to do this...


David Frisbie, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVS, of Colorado State University, spoke to a large audience at the 2009 American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) convention, held Dec. 5-9 in Las Vegas, Nev., about treating joint disease with a novel formulation not yet approved by the FDA.

Frisbie stressed that you have to have an accurate diagnosis to treat the problem effectively. Treatment goals for osteoarthritis are to decrease pain (using a symptom-modifying osteoarthritic drug or SMOAD) and to minimize further deterioration (using a disease-modifying osteoarthritic drug or DMOAD).

Polyglycan, the novel formulation made up of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (HACSAG), is labeled for intra-articular post-surgical lavage and replacement of synovial fluid. It is not currently marketed or approved as a drug in the United States, although it is manufactured here in an FDA-inspected and -approved facility.

Investigators created a surgically induced cartilage fragment on a joint of each horse in three study groups. The same joint on each horse's opposite limb served as a sham control.

* Group A: Placebo group, in which both joints were treated with saline and the antibiotic amikacin.
* Group B: Intra-articular (IA) treatment with Polyglycan injected weekly for four treatments.
* Group C: Intravenous (IV) treatment with Polyglycan injected every five days along with saline and antibiotic in both joints.

All horses were exercised five days per week on a high-speed treadmill beginning Day 14 and ending Day 70.

In summary, lameness in the IA-treated limbs was significantly reduced. Frisbie pointed out that this favorable result, along with reduction in gross articular changes and signs of bone growth as seen on radiographs, suggested both SMOAD and DMOAD effects. The IV-treated group showed DMOAD effects, including a significant decrease in the amount of gross pathology (disease) of full-thickness articular cartilage erosion.

Yet, investigators aren't sure why the IV-treated joints were more flexible and had fewer abnormal radiographic changes; they did not expect these results to coincide with the reported DMOAD effects. Frisbie believes it is possible that the drug's effects on soft tissues and on radiographic changes is different from its effects on articular cartilage. He noted that there are ongoing studies on IV Polyglycan therapy based on the assumption of biologic activity with this treatment approach.


Now.. do you really think he'd be wasting his time studying this if there wasn't a good reason to?? There is more to come from Polyglycan research used IV.. I'm anxious to see what they determine... but I already see the results.

To each their own on what they are comfortable with using. I only know Adequan, with all the research behind it and 'FDA approval'... did NOTHING for my horse. I may as well have injected water. I won't waste my money on something that does not help him no matter what the 'research' shows.

And for what it's worth, even if there is written law on using 'off label' medications, just about every vet I know of does... if they REALLY were going to lose their licenses, there would be very few left.

deltawave
Oct. 7, 2010, 11:50 AM
Well, using Adequan monthly or "whenever", and for generalized issues, is off label, too, strictly speaking, as the only LABELED, APPROVED INDICATION is for very specific types of osteoarthritis, in a very particular dosing regimen.

From the package insert:

Adequan is indicated for use only in the carpal joint of horses. Do not mix Adequan with other drugs or solvents.

So 99% of the horses, vets, and owners that talk about this product on COTH are using Adequan OFF LABEL. *shrug*

The ON LABEL indications for a drug are almost never up to date with actual practice guidelines. That has more to do with marketing than actual research.

pattir7
Oct. 7, 2010, 12:25 PM
Wow deltawave! Didn't know that! Learn something new everyday. Maybe in my horse's case, I can conclude that he doesn't have arthritis of the carpel joint... :cool:

davistina67
Oct. 7, 2010, 04:11 PM
Deltawave...

Where did u find your info? I went to their website and what I read says IM and nothing at all about in the joints.

deltawave
Oct. 7, 2010, 04:34 PM
Just the package insert. Maybe I was looking at the "IA" stuff, though. Sure seems like it. My bad. If you pull up the package insert for the IM kind, there should be "indications" for that, as well. But I'm virtually certain the only "on label" indication for the IM stuff is the standard 28-day regimen. Everything else? Off label.

Bogie
Oct. 7, 2010, 04:51 PM
Interesting, isn't it, how common practice and "on label" use of drugs diverge.

I will say that I used Chondroprotec, per my vet's recommendation, on my last horse. I did the loading dose and found he was more comfortable. One shot per month didn't do it for him; two shots per month made a huge difference. Alternate weeks I gave my horse Acetyl-D, which is an injectible glucosomine.

My vet practice recommends for either Adequan or Chondroprotec that you do the loading dose and start with one shot per month, see where you are and adjust from there.

When I last asked my vet about polyglycan, he said he had not seen enough results from it to make a decision. However, that was several years ago.

My practical experience indicates that all horses are different and what helps one horse doesn't necessarily help another.

Certainly with my older horse, the biggest difference came from injecting his hocks.

Sandra6500
Oct. 7, 2010, 04:59 PM
This cracks me up a bit. Of course anything that can go into a JOINT is sterile. To say otherwise is just silly.

As for the safety- it doesn't take much to read the label. Nothing in polyglycan is new, special, etc. Also it is NOT illegal for a vet to dispense for IV use- read the law again... There is no approved like product- it would be a combination of several products to get something sort of "like" it. Perhaps a small grey zone, but totally not an issue for any of the vets I know (and they ALL will use it).

Since there isn't really a safety concern with Polyglycan (other than perhaps someone shredding their horses vein trying to give it IV) I would say that as with so many things equine its trial and error. If it makes a difference for your horse- great. If not stop using it. Even clinical trails don't always mean much. On this thread alone we have people saying "adequan doesn't work" and some that say "adequan works wonders". It really depends on each individual horses issues. I don't think there is much question that the ingredients in Polyglycan CAN help for some horses.

davistina67
Oct. 7, 2010, 05:15 PM
Maybe there is a big difference in where people live as far as if they are are going to risk being sued. I am in Colorado and know about 30 equine vets very well. Out of that 30, there are 3, maybe 4 that will take the risk of RXing it since it is an off label use.

Off label means for a condition, not a specific ingredient. Example, well, kinda, maybe not a good one........ apple flavored bute has been around for years. It was illegal to use it because there is another product on the market that is approved for pain relief for horses. Some vets got in trouble for RXing it since it was not approved. That has changed now and the apple flavored is approved for use in the past year.

JB
Oct. 7, 2010, 05:37 PM
DW, you are correct. The IA use of Adequan has ONLY been studied in the knee, therefore that is all it's labeled for. However, it's used elsewhere.

IM is not a part-specific use, so with regards to that, there is no label. However, as you said, the on-label use is 1 shot every 4 days for 7 total shots - 28 days. The weekly, monthly, every 3 weeks, however it's being used, is an off-label use. Technically :)

Leather
Oct. 7, 2010, 05:38 PM
Off label means for a condition, not a specific ingredient

Off-label takes into consideration indication, active ingredient and dosage.

An example of allowable off-label use is Pergolide. There was no equine version available, so vets could prescribe the human drug.

A current example of non-allowable off-label use is prescribing Previcox in the place of Equioxx.

Apple flavored bute is more of a compounding issue:
http://www.avma.org/issues/drugs/compounding/veterinary_compounding_brochure.asp

davistina67
Oct. 7, 2010, 05:44 PM
Great point Leather!!!!

Lieslot
Oct. 7, 2010, 07:07 PM
Anyone uses Ichon IM instead of Adequan IM? Cheaper & no prescription needed. Would like to hear your thoughts.

I just found this here, seems this vet is using it on her own horses.
http://www.justanswer.com/questions/2ivpz-hi-could-you-please-tell-me-about-the-products-made-by-kinetic
(see answer halfway down page)

http://www.farmvet.com/pc-389-163-ichon-100mgml-lavage.aspx