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rwh
Jun. 2, 2010, 12:17 AM
I've seen a couple of horses recently going in a pelham with only a curb rein and I was wondering what effect this achieves. TIA

Lucassb
Jun. 2, 2010, 01:04 AM
I've seen a couple of horses recently going in a pelham with only a curb rein and I was wondering what effect this achieves. TIA

Well, IMO it has the effect of making the rider look clueless.

Hunter Mom
Jun. 2, 2010, 09:35 AM
Well, IMO it has the effect of making the rider look clueless.

You beat me to it! Or a horse that is so hard to control with a rider who can't handle two reins.

minor detail
Jun. 2, 2010, 09:45 AM
I imagine people are doing it because they saw Eric Lamaze riding Hickstead like that.... certainly not something I would do but I am sure he is not clueless :) Hickstead is known to be a very, very difficult ride. Some people are pretty quick to follow suit with what they see pros doing even if they themselves do not have the experience or knowledge... Hopefully not something that catches on

findeight
Jun. 2, 2010, 10:23 AM
It achieves the effect of removing any subtlety this curb bit had when it allowed the rider to use it as a snaffle with the top rein and only add the curb as needed to reinforce the snaffle.

Basically, it is now a Western curb and you can't ride on light contact.

That may work at 1.5 meters for an elite class rider. Not so much the wannabes. Who may just not know any better or even who EL is in the first place, let alone be copying.

skrgirl
Jun. 2, 2010, 12:20 PM
Makes it function like a tomb thumb thumb bit.

JB
Jun. 2, 2010, 01:20 PM
I imagine people are doing it because they saw Eric Lamaze riding Hickstead like that.... certainly not something I would do but I am sure he is not clueless :) Hickstead is known to be a very, very difficult ride. Some people are pretty quick to follow suit with what they see pros doing even if they themselves do not have the experience or knowledge... Hopefully not something that catches on

You beat me to it - I was going to say "probably people saw a pro using it for a very valid reason, and didn't even begin to understand what that reason might be, and figured it would be a cool shortcut"

HenryisBlaisin'
Jun. 2, 2010, 06:38 PM
I've heard of old-school riders in some places doing this and actually learning/teaching that way. (Barbara Woodhouse comes to mind). Like many other things, it has fallen out of fashion.

I will say that I once had a mare that went WONDERFULLY on a loose rein this way. She was much more relaxed than in a snaffle or even the pelham that had both reins attached. I tried it after reading about it in one of the old school books and figured it was worth a shot. It helped me teach her to supple and relax, and after awhile, I was able to add the rein and then go to a snaffle and still get the same softness. It also taught me the value of an independent hand right quick as she did NOT like it pulled on (and rightfully so). Which is probably why she went better-and once I learned to be more independent, she went better in other bits.

jewll27
Jun. 2, 2010, 06:52 PM
I rode many ponies as a kid who were put in this combo. They were dead broke lesson ponies who got quick when cantering and jumping. Most of the kids riding them were dead beginners and my trainer at the time felt it was the right way to go.

J. Turner
Jun. 2, 2010, 10:35 PM
Michael Matz rides his "pony" Messenger with just a curb rein on a pelham, with a flash noseband. For shame. (please note sarcasm)

JumpingBug
Jun. 2, 2010, 10:38 PM
IF your going to do that get a kimberwick or bit converters LOL

Trees4U
Jun. 3, 2010, 09:19 AM
Agree with Findeight.

riding off the shank- like a western bit. Without the 6" and up shank length.

Marcella
Jun. 3, 2010, 01:31 PM
I've seen photos where GM commented how the rider rode with the snaffle part of the pelham on a loose rein and the curb tight...this was a very accomplished rider and was doing it because he knew what he was doing. It is an old black and white, that I've seen multiple times. I'm sure someone knows what I'm referring to. This was in the hunters, though, so you would need both reins. In the jumpers, you can obviously just get away with the 1 rein.

Timex
Jun. 3, 2010, 10:15 PM
I think Michael Matz can be forgiven for his ignorence. ;) lol