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Rival
May. 29, 2010, 02:04 AM
I decided to make the switch back after a 5 year hiatus in dressage land and need new tack. I suppose I could pick up a magazine but would like some fashion input from those showing. What colour tack? Wide or narrow nosebands? padded? fancy stiched or plain? Half pads or numnahs? Thanks.

doublesstable
May. 29, 2010, 02:38 AM
Seeing A LOT of the Charles Owen helmets.. not so many GPA's. Still dark hunt coats.. navy, browns etc. Breeches either Taylor Made grey green or yellow green colors. Some of the boots I have seen have the patent leather tops and toe caps.. I see a bit of bling only on belts - w/ crowns and crystals. No shirt pins. Either plain or monogramed. Shirts are white, yellow, pink, salmon, blue etc.. light colors

Medium to dark colored tack is in. Bridles are not thick but not really thin. Plain rolled is what I have been seeing. Saddles "must" have knee rolls.

Pads are the fuzzy white that trims neatly around the saddle.

In our area this is pretty much the norm. Might depend on where you are.... have fun and good luck....

pintopiaffe
May. 29, 2010, 03:00 AM
Saddles "must" have knee rolls

Pencil OK? Padded flaps? or plain flap ok?

Thank God I'm not planning to enter a ring until late summer... :uhoh:

heartinrye
May. 29, 2010, 07:57 AM
As long as you're neat and clean, and you put in a good trip, you'll get a ribbon ;)

englishivy
May. 29, 2010, 08:15 AM
As long as you're neat and clean, and you put in a good trip, you'll get a ribbon ;)

This.

I know fashion and being up to date with what is popular is a fun part of showing for a lot of people. But what really irks me is the rider, dressed to the nines in all the latest, and most expensive get-up who can't.ride.for.anything.

Seriously, invest that fashion money into lessons and training, for you are scary and putting me into early labor.

carry on!

Rival
May. 29, 2010, 11:49 AM
"Seriously, invest that fashion money into lessons and training, for you are scary and putting me into early labor."

Yeah, I thought about that but asking my coach to jump my horse in my lovely custom Dutch Hulsebos dressage saddle would probably cause her to have a baby and she isn't even pregnant.

I'm not asking to be a massive snob. I just have to start from square on as the only thing hunter I own is a cheap HDR bridle and an orange crosby girth. I was so convinced I wasn't going to jump anymore that I gave away my field boots. How do you think the custom super stiff Konigs are going to do me (please note sacasm)? Are half chaps and paddock boots actually allowed now?

I'm not looking for the most earth shatteringly expensive ideas but when starting from scratch it would be nice not to get stuff that makes you look like a total dork.

Also my mare is extremely hard to fit a saddle to because she is so wide.

Besides... Hunter Princess is a down grade as I used to be a queen! (just kidding)

doublesstable
May. 29, 2010, 12:19 PM
I believe and understand that you don't need the 100,000 WB and the CWD saddle and the Charles Owen helmet to win... I know this because growing up, I had the 200.00 Appy and whatever else my parents could afford.. and we still won... A good ride is a good ride.. neat and tidy is the key...

However, the OP asked "whats IN" in the Hunter ring. So I only answered the question; What's in. ;-))

Trixie
May. 29, 2010, 12:33 PM
Are half chaps and paddock boots actually allowed now?

Nope.

I'd start with a brown close contact saddle that actually fits your horse. Most people don't like the flat saddles, but I do, and if it's shaped like a close contact it doesn't matter. I'd skip anything shaped like an all purpose, I don't like jumping in mine.

A matching brown bridle. Your preferences are your preferences - whatever flatters your horse. Some people really like the ones with big padding, others don't. My horse shows in a double half round 1970s crosby bridle (http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL936/3762429/10700270/314283213.jpg) or a fancy stitched brown bridle with fancy stitched reins. It should match your saddle and NEITHER SHOULD BE ORANGE NO MATTER WHAT. If it is, oil the hell out of it with darkening oil and sit it in the sun until it isn't anymore.

Breeches are typically of a heavier material. I suppose "in" would be tailored sportsmans, ariats, pikeur - any of the better brands, really. Buy what fits, avoid anything too grossly skin colored or too tight. The "heavy cotton" ones are flattering on nobody. Wear a belt.

Shirts and coats are your preference, they change about once a week. Navy and white is always appropriate - always wear a long sleeved show shirt. A used good wool coat is a better investment than a cheap nylon one for the same price. My navy coat was $25 on sale and is wool.

Field boots - the higher tops and tapered ankles are in because they're more flattering to your leg. Skip any boots with any kind of "top" unless you have earned your colors with a recognized hunt, otherwise it is just tacky.

ASTM/SEI approved helmet. We see a lot of Charles Owens and GPAs, but buy what fits your head. Do your hair appropriately.

klmck63
May. 29, 2010, 01:12 PM
Nope.

Well, if you happen to be in Canada, paddock boots and half chaps are allowed so long as they're the same colour.

You're going to need a close contact saddle that fits you and your horse. Knee rolls, thigh blocks etc. are in style but optional, buy whatever is comfortable to you and fits your budget. Nobody can really tell if your saddle is outdated or not once you're in it.

Buy a matching bridle that flatters your horse's face. Padded, raised, fancy stitched, etc. are all in style. Take a look at what is offered by brands like Antares, Edgewood, Hadfields etc. You don't actually have to purchase such an expensive bridle, but it will give you an idea of what people are buying.

All the leather should be somewhere in between havanaish and dark brown. No orange!

For your first basic show outfit I would buy a navy show coat (don't be afraid of good quality used ones) in a brand like Grand Prix, Ariat, Tailored Sportsman, RJ Classics, etc. A white shirt and beigey/greeny breeches in a brand like Ariat, Tailored Sportsman, RJ Classics, etc. Again, you don't have to buy from the pricier brands but it will give you an idea of what's popular.

If you need field boots in the states, Mountain Horse and Grand Prix are both nice brands at a more affordable price.

Have fun!

Go Fish
May. 29, 2010, 01:38 PM
But what really irks me is the rider, dressed to the nines in all the latest, and most expensive get-up who can't.ride.for.anything.

:rolleyes:

So, if they can't ride, they should be outfitted like a cheap trick?

To the OP, have a blast shopping! Others have offered great advice. If you have a good local tack store, go in and throw yourself on the mercy of an expert!

Alameda
May. 29, 2010, 02:50 PM
What's in? 8 jumps, good front end, prompt lead changes, an even pace. ;)

englishivy
May. 29, 2010, 03:40 PM
:rolleyes:

So, if they can't ride, they should be outfitted like a cheap trick?

Yes, I think if you are learning to ride/a beginner rider, you should have to wear rubber boots and plastic helmets b/c you don't deserve to look the part. (*sarcasm).

No, I'm talking about the riders that really should invest in their riding first and fashion second. When one spends more money, time, and energy into "looking the part" and not "being the part", it takes away from the spirit of the sport, usually at the horse's expense.

I have no problem with people liking fashion. I have no problem with people wanting to be up to date with trends. What I don't like is seeing horses that are in fake frames, no hind end engagement, stiff backs, no topline, and yanking their knees to their eyeballs while they belly-out o/f. Or riders not giving any release o/f, stirrups too long, bodies disconnected and minds not thinking. All the custom tack and trendy apparel doesn't change any of that.

Forgive me for being snarky, but I'm over it. :dead:

OP-go have fun and focus on the ride. Visit your local tack shop and ask them for advice if you really want some new digs. They will know what is really "in" for your area anyway. My point for you is that fashion doesn't make the round; with a good ride, nobody will care what color your jacket is.

klmck63
May. 29, 2010, 03:46 PM
All the custom tack and trendy apparel doesn't change any of that.

You're right, fancy tack and fashion doesn't make you a good rider, but I suspect that those that can afford all of the custom tack and trendy apparel are not in a financial situation that forces them to choose between new fancy tack and lessons.

They might just be more concerned with the tack and fashion than working on what is imparted to them in lessons.

rugbygirl
May. 29, 2010, 03:51 PM
Echoing whoever said half chaps and paddock boots are ok, there is a specific comment in the EC rules about them having to be leather-like. I think that's so you don't accidentally wear your neon Gore-Tex endurance gaiters. :D You see half chaps and paddock boots in our "A" rated shows, usually on younger kids or else in the lower Adult Ammy classes.

Different culture maybe, but do the USEF rules say "no half chaps?" I suppose it might also depend on individual show rules.

I also recently got told again that a darker gray or navy coat will never be out of style. Other colours come and go.

Trixie
May. 29, 2010, 04:41 PM
The USEF rules for hunters specify NO CHAPS. When we called to ask if this meant no half chaps that look like boots, they said those are still considered chaps. I'm sure it's up to the individual judge to notice, but I wouldn't chance being marked down over something that arbitrary.


No, I'm talking about the riders that really should invest in their riding first and fashion second. When one spends more money, time, and energy into "looking the part" and not "being the part", it takes away from the spirit of the sport, usually at the horse's expense.

I have no problem with people liking fashion. I have no problem with people wanting to be up to date with trends. What I don't like is seeing horses that are in fake frames, no hind end engagement, stiff backs, no topline, and yanking their knees to their eyeballs while they belly-out o/f. Or riders not giving any release o/f, stirrups too long, bodies disconnected and minds not thinking. All the custom tack and trendy apparel doesn't change any of that.

Forgive me for being snarky, but I'm over it

Honestly? You're being ridiculous.

Wanting to look appropriate is not synonymous with riding like crap. It's also not a statement that a rider is going to fail to take lessons or train properly, in the interest of purchasing expensive breeches and a bling belt. In fact, I think that asking about what is modern and appropriate shows a rider who is doing their homework and making sure they have all their basis covered properly before showing up at a horse show.

Takes away from the spirit of the sport? :lol:

RolyPolyPony
May. 29, 2010, 04:55 PM
Besides... Hunter Princess is a down grade as I used to be a queen! (just kidding)

Bwahahahah!! Best line ever :)

Go Fish
May. 29, 2010, 07:20 PM
You're right, fancy tack and fashion doesn't make you a good rider, but I suspect that those that can afford all of the custom tack and trendy apparel are not in a financial situation that forces them to choose between new fancy tack and lessons.

Thank you. That was the point I was trying to make but it went over EnglishIvy's head. I didn't read anywhere in the OP's post where he/she indicated that they were sacrificing lessons/training to be a fashion plate.

It's tiresome, sometimes, to have people disparage others who want to spend their money as they see fit. How presumptious to say to the OP that they should spend his/her money on lessons first. Guess what? Some of us have the means to do both.

englishivy
May. 29, 2010, 07:24 PM
Honestly? You're being ridiculous.

Wanting to look appropriate is not synonymous with riding like crap. It's also not a statement that a rider is going to fail to take lessons or train properly, in the interest of purchasing expensive breeches and a bling belt. In fact, I think that asking about what is modern and appropriate shows a rider who is doing their homework and making sure they have all their basis covered properly before showing up at a horse show.

Takes away from the spirit of the sport? :lol:

Ok, read my first post. I'm not talking about looking appropriate; absolutely look appropriate and proper. I'm totally into the tradition of hunters. But asking what is proper is NOT the same as asking what is in style. And being in style is fine too. I'm talking about riders that want to look like $1M bucks but don't want to ride like $1M bucks.

You know, I actually had a (former) client who wouldn't put her horse on Adequan despite the vets, the farrier, and my recommendation. The reason? It was too expensive. But she owned FOUR show coats and about 10 show shirts. The irony: she always dropped the coats when jackets were waived. For her, being "in" was more important than her horse. Hence why she is a former client....

Say what you will, I'm in a foul mood as of late...but hey, being 37 weeks along in the heat will do that to you ;)

englishivy
May. 29, 2010, 07:25 PM
Thank you. That was the point I was trying to make but it went over EnglishIvy's head. I didn't read anywhere in the OP's post where he/she indicated that they were sacrificing lessons/training to be a fashion plate.

It's tiresome, sometimes, to have people disparage others who want to spend their money as they see fit. How presumptious to say to the OP that they should spend his/her money on lessons first. Guess what? Some of us have the means to do both.

No, you misread MY post. I never implied the OP needed more lessons. Just that I enjoy when someone can ride as well as they look fashion wise.

I was saying that she shouldn't worry too much about fashion; a GOOD RIDE IS A GOOD RIDE.

Sheesh people.

ETA-in reading my first post, it may appear to you guys I was saying to the OP specificlly to invest in lessons. My bad. I was talking about those who haven't invested in their riding but have invested in their fashion. THOSE people are scaring me....not the OP.

accidental cowgirl
May. 29, 2010, 08:29 PM
This may be repetitive with what others have said, but what I've seen as being in for hunters: contoured full pads (not half pads), medium to dark brown tack, saddles with padded flaps, charles owen helmets, dark coats with light shirts, field boots with high spanish tops, D ring bits. I've heard black hunt coats are in style, but I still see navy the most. Even the fleecy girths and sheepskin-lined front boots (for eq) that have been popular in recent years seem to be out. Generally, a more traditional, conservative look seems to be back in style in the hunters.

pintopiaffe
May. 29, 2010, 08:34 PM
:lol:

I actually come at it from the opposite... I'm coming back into Hunters (granted, breed show, but still) after a... erm... a couple<coughthreecough> decades...

And while I am having a BLAST getting us both decked out, I also dont want to look... I guess presumptuous?

I pretty much know we're going to slightly suck... and I don't want to 'overdress' or be 'over tacked' for our level of suckiness.

Does that make sense? :uhoh:

To me it's like wearing a top hat in dressage... If you're going to wear it without the tails, you'd better be able to RIDE. :lol:

So I'm going with what I like, coupled with (hopefully) understated, and I'll admit, I'm also probably dating myself with the Passier Century... but, it fits His Princeness & the Pea, so, there ya go.

For the OP, go over to thecollectiononlinestore.com and see what she's got. THEN ask for sale/specials in your size. Robin is usually really on top of what is 'in' AND what is 'classic' and ALWAYS in, and usually has a good handle on what is going to be in next season too. She actually refused to sell me a green jacket that I thought I wanted--and she was right! NOT for me or my pony.

I think what is really fun about Hunters is that you can vary slightly--subtle colours, pinstripes coordinating with shirts, etc., and compliment your horse.

MY tack isn't going to be darkest brown, because oakbark compliments my guy so nicely. It won't be orange--but it won't be dark-dark either. I know that's a little behind the trend--the newest Dover catalogue has many of the bridles that used to be available in oakbark now only available in 'cocoa' or 'chocolate' or some such... Give me a nice london/newmarket and let me oil it down to the right shade FOR MY HORSE. ;)

Oh, and we'll probably end up with an out-of-date half-pad vs. a fitted, because I'm having a helluva time finding a fitted that fits the Century right. :sigh:

Lucassb
May. 29, 2010, 08:51 PM
Not too many adult ammies aspire to be the next big GP star.

A bunch of us like shopping for tack, apparel, etc - it's part of the fun. I have NEVER understood why people have a problem with that. There is so much about showing that you cannot control - the squawk of the loudspeaker feedback just as you canter past on the way to that first long run to the single oxer. The dog that gets loose and chases your horse on the opening circle. The little stumble on the uneven ground that takes the pretty distance away in a line. The list goes on.

Being turned out to the nines so that you look like a winner entering the ring is something that you CAN completely control. IMO that includes the elbow grease and proper conditioning to have your horse looking his absolute best, as well as having beautiful, properly fitted tack and apparel. Note this does not have to cost a fortune; elbow grease is free, and with the advent of Ebay etc, anyone can dress even in the very nicest brands for very modest cost.

I take a boat load of lessons but even if I didn't, if I chose to spend $$ on the latest breeches, helmet, saddle etc... it's my money to spend and so called professionals who look down on that choice come across as, well, kind of self interested.

As for trends - wide noseband bridles have been popular for the last season or two. Still see some jackets with colored linings and perhaps a bit of subtle piping on the collar. It is an art to come up with a shirt/jacket color combo that compliments your horse and stands out in a good way, yet is still appropriately respectful of tradition. Plain fitted saddle pads are much more common than half pads in my area, and riders tend to be sporting the CO Wellington Pro or similar helmets.

And of course, the ultimate look is a nice forward ride on a good jumping, good moving horse that shows the classic perfect bascule over 8 jumps in a steady, relaxed rhythm.

jewll27
May. 29, 2010, 08:58 PM
a recent change from the TS of old to the ones with the seam around the butt or "european stitch"? Basically they look like fullseat breeches except the fabric stays the same and it has regular knee patches. the Pikeurs look like this as well.

harkington
May. 29, 2010, 10:17 PM
I have a bay horse, no markings except for a white face. I am a big fan of buying expensive stuff and keeping it for a long time, so I tend to try and buy stuff that is considered 'classic'. I wear:

A white show shirt with collar, no stock pin or tie.

Navy hunt coat, slightly silky pinstripe running through it (does this make sense?) I am still young and wanted a pop of color so I went for a very light pink on the underside of the jacket.

The beige Tailored Sportsmans with the new fake full seat- they fit me the best.

Black field boots- can't go wrong with a classic pair!

Black leather gloves.

GPA helmet- although I do love the CO Hamptons, but the GPA fit the best.

My horse wears:
A dark brown, very thin bridle, no fancy stitch or padding.

Plain standing martingale, same color as the bridle.

A dark brown close contact saddle with knee rolls.

White fuzzy shaped pad.

Leather girth.

Overall, though, it is not the most stylish horse/rider combo that will win. One thing that drives me crazy is a horse/rider combo that is well-dressed and put in a good trip but are 'messy'... braids all over the place, saddle pads falling out of keepers, stirrups untucked, hair escaping from hairnets. If you put in a good trip and are clean and neat, your ribbons will reflect this.

Trixie
May. 29, 2010, 10:47 PM
Ok, read my first post. I'm not talking about looking appropriate; absolutely look appropriate and proper. I'm totally into the tradition of hunters. But asking what is proper is NOT the same as asking what is in style. And being in style is fine too. I'm talking about riders that want to look like $1M bucks but don't want to ride like $1M bucks.

I don’t know where you got the impression that the OP didn’t want to ride well, or that her desire to dress properly would circumvent her horsemanship.

Like Lucassb said - turnout is one of the things that you CAN control. Why WOULDN’T someone want to go into the ring looking like a million bucks? It gives an excellent first impression when one walks into the ring looking like the winner. It makes the judge want to pin you. And yes, you can be proper and still be “in style.” No one here was advocating that the OP bling herself out.

Further, if you just read the rulebook, it really gives you no indication of what exactly you’re supposed to be wearing in comparison to the other riders. “Dark or scarlet coats” doesn’t tell you that scarlet is incredibly rare, that wearing a wool hunt coat is a more sensible fabric than polyester, which tends to look shinier and cheaper, not to mention that they don‘t breathe. “White, buff, or canary” breeches doesn’t tell you that no one really wears canary, women don’t generally wear white, and “buff” now ranges from beige to greenish, and that stock ties are mostly worn in the most formal classes and that no one really wears stock pins with a choker.

Thus, asking what is “in style” is actually a practical question. The whole point of hunters is NOT to stick out, it’s to be tastefully subtle and to basically look exactly like anyone else - much like at a foxhunt. Therefore, your HORSE can shine because you are secondary.


You know, I actually had a (former) client who wouldn't put her horse on Adequan despite the vets, the farrier, and my recommendation. The reason? It was too expensive. But she owned FOUR show coats and about 10 show shirts. The irony: she always dropped the coats when jackets were waived. For her, being "in" was more important than her horse. Hence why she is a former client....

This has nothing to do with the question. The OP didn’t give anyone any indication that her riding or her horse were suffering because she wanted to know what is currently acceptable in the show ring.

Fun Size
May. 29, 2010, 10:57 PM
The beige Tailored Sportsmans with the new fake full seat- they fit me the best.


This! I love these, they fit me the best and are really comfortable. Some strict traditionalists don't like them, but with so many people wearing them even in the higher divisions I don't see an issue. Not that I am a "follow the crowd" type person, but since these DO fit me the best, I'm all for it! :D

doublesstable
May. 30, 2010, 01:22 AM
It's kind of cool as a more "mature" rider - I was told at the tack store when I liked something and wondered if it would stick out like a sore thumb.. the store owner (that I do know well) said - "You have been riding long enough and are of the age that "you" can set a trend."

I ended up buying those yellow-y colored breeches and beautiful coolmax yellow shirt to go with my already owned brown coat.. They are the most beautiful yellow breeches... I just love them.....

And at the show, I had a few complements on them... NO ONE ELSE had them that I saw... Ha Ha......

I really like what you said Lucassb..... very good! As always!
I couldn't control the "tractors and water truck" the day of my most recent show.. uggg.. ;-)))

pintopiaffe
May. 30, 2010, 01:38 AM
oooh... that bodes well. I too am 'of a certain age...'

For once, that's a GOOD thing, 'eh? :cool:

I know that I was the only one in rust breeks & a hunter green jacket the last time I showed round-and-round... I'm not going *quite* that far this time. Though I do have the most lovely Harry Halls... <wistfulsigh>

florida foxhunter
May. 30, 2010, 06:31 AM
Did I read in an above post that it is okay to wear your "hunt boots" in a hunter class, especially at a rated show?

I have been a member of a hunt for to many years to count and have patent top dress boots, but always wear my plain field boots (Ariat) when in a show.
I have worn my shadbelly in a hunter classic and it does have my colors on it. Is that where one would wear the patent tops too? Surely you wouldn't wear the with a regular show hunter coat would you?

Just curious........

copper1
May. 30, 2010, 07:02 AM
Again, you will not win or lose on what you and your horse are wearing if it is all legal and you go well, but it is nice to be "in fashion". One does not need to go out and buy the most expensive things or to replace perfectly serviciable items. If you have dress boots that fit nicely, you really don't need to go out and buy field boots! Replacing the dressage saddle does make sense but you don't HAVE to have knee rolls but a saddle that suits both you and your horse. You will not lose points if you are not wearing a CO or GPA! Have fun, ride as best you can!

mvp
May. 30, 2010, 07:53 AM
Ever heard that term? If I understand it, it comes from some sociologists in the 1970s. They wanted to know why the working poor put their money into tricking up their POS used cars and bought stereo equipment rather than behaving like the prudent middle class who bought houses and college degrees for their kiddies.

What they discovered is that the po' folks were behaving quite rationally. If you have hope of affording the big things, you buy the little things.

You cannot tell me that even middle class people don't do participate in their own "culture of poverty." That's probably more true in the hunter ring than any other. If a competitive 3'6" horse costs 6 figures, then damn, it becomes rational to drop $1K on boots or (maybe) $4K on a saddle, 'cause honey, you're never going to have the post-tax, post-pay-the-rest-of-your-bills wad for the horse or $2.5K per week to spend in Florida.

sadlmakr
May. 30, 2010, 08:31 AM
It has been my experience over the last 40 some years to go conservative classic in habits and tack.
Passier Century is a good saddle. Use conditioner and keep it clean and I see no reason you can't go well with it in the ring. Same with your bridle. Clean and well cared for looks good anytime. If the girth needs darkening then look for a saddler who can dye it dark or leave it out in the sun a bit and use a darkening oil.
As for your attire, it is best not to look too overly dressed. You can look great with conservative and classic. Good boots need not be pricey
And if the horse goes well, who's gonna look at you? They will be looking at your great horse. So make sure the horse is well groomed and spiffy
With your experience you ought to do well.
I see no reason to go out and spend thousands of dollars on tack and habit and not do well because of anxiety over what you and the horse are wearing.
Look sharp and clean and do your best and you will do alright.
I wish you the best.
JMHO. sadlmakr

mvp
May. 30, 2010, 08:53 AM
This may be a bad bet, but I predict that half pads will become more acceptable in the hunter ring. There are just too many out there and too many people who use them to create the fit they want not to have people decide to use attractive fleece-rimmed ones at shows.

But I'm not entirely sure. When Bevals launched its felt and fleece "therapeutic pad" aka "the vagina pad" that appeared in the hunter ring for a while.

If I were showing a horse for weeks on end and a half pad made the difference between sore back and fine, I'd find a way to use the half pad. And if I were showing weeks on end, I'd be among the TippyTop group people were watching in Florida where ever.

SillyHorse
May. 30, 2010, 09:35 AM
Did I read in an above post that it is okay to wear your "hunt boots" in a hunter class, especially at a rated show?

I have been a member of a hunt for to many years to count and have patent top dress boots, but always wear my plain field boots (Ariat) when in a show.
I have worn my shadbelly in a hunter classic and it does have my colors on it. Is that where one would wear the patent tops too? Surely you wouldn't wear the with a regular show hunter coat would you?

Just curious........
Your horses are so nice that no one will notice what you're wearing! :lol:

Hunter Mom
May. 30, 2010, 10:00 AM
IMHO, there is no way you can go wrong with quality, classic clothes & tack in the hunter ring. I had a lovely navy wool jacket as a kid. It is now being worn by a third rider and looks as nice now as it did 20+ years ago. The only way that works is to have it be good quality & classic styling. Fads come & go, quality is always in style!

OP - I show in an HDR bridle. While it may not be the "best" brand out there, it is a quality piece of tack and well cared for. It's on my jumper now, but was on my last horse for several years. My saddle isn't a $4000 saddle, but it fits me and my horse. Neat, clean & tidy is always acceptable.

SunBelle
May. 30, 2010, 03:26 PM
"The Culture of Poverty"

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Ever heard that term? If I understand it, it comes from some sociologists in the 1970s. They wanted to know why the working poor put their money into tricking up their POS used cars and bought stereo equipment rather than behaving like the prudent middle class who bought houses and college degrees for their kiddies.

What they discovered is that the po' folks were behaving quite rationally. If you have hope of affording the big things, you buy the little things.

You cannot tell me that even middle class people don't do participate in their own "culture of poverty." That's probably more true in the hunter ring than any other. If a competitive 3'6" horse costs 6 figures, then damn, it becomes rational to drop $1K on boots or (maybe) $4K on a saddle, 'cause honey, you're never going to have the post-tax, post-pay-the-rest-of-your-bills wad for the horse or $2.5K per week to spend in Florida."

mvp, You rock!

Gestalt
May. 30, 2010, 04:01 PM
It's possible GM would tell you to "go classic with fit and function in mind" and to always have a horse that is better dressed (as in well groomed) than the rider.

Ghazzu
May. 30, 2010, 04:21 PM
Are half chaps and paddock boots actually allowed now?
Nope.



I'm not so sure about that.
I just checked the USEF rule book hunter division rules, and there's no mention of boots at all under HU 127.
Chaps are not permitted, but half-chaps are not mentioned.
Half-chaps are expressly permitted in the dressage division, at lower levels.

Trixie
May. 30, 2010, 04:56 PM
When we called the USEF to ask if they were permitted, they said that half chaps, even the ones that look like boots, are chaps. It's judge's discretion to notice and penalize, but I wouldn't risk it if avoidable.

jewll27
May. 30, 2010, 05:38 PM
This may be a bad bet, but I predict that half pads will become more acceptable in the hunter ring. There are just too many out there and too many people who use them to create the fit they want not to have people decide to use attractive fleece-rimmed ones at shows.

But I'm not entirely sure. When Bevals launched its felt and fleece "therapeutic pad" aka "the vagina pad" that appeared in the hunter ring for a while.

If I were showing a horse for weeks on end and a half pad made the difference between sore back and fine, I'd find a way to use the half pad. And if I were showing weeks on end, I'd be among the TippyTop group people were watching in Florida where ever.

thats all anyone used around here for awhile and the trend is swinging back towards full fleece pads