PDA

View Full Version : Why you should listen when a trusted friend tells you to NOT ride like a hunter rider



Alterrain
May. 27, 2010, 05:41 PM
I am such a dumbass.

Stopped by my neighbors yesterday to say hi, she was riding her greenie and asked if I wanted to ride him a little. I had not come from the barn and thus did not have any riding equipment (should have been the first red flag). I hopped on him in khakis, sneakers (I know) and no helmet (again, I know.) trot around, quiet as can be. Canter around, DEAD quiet. She says, want to hop that x-rail? (Note: it's maybe 10") She says, he likes you to ride more EQy, not like a hunter ride so much. Well, he stepped over the x, and then let out the BIGGEST buck. RIGHT as I was still in hunter-landing mode.

:no:

I am fine, landed flat on my back though, and really got the wind knocked out of me. After realizing I was ok, neighbor burst out laughing, said I TOLD you! less hunter, more EQ.

SO: when someone tells you how to ride THEIR OWN horse, DO IT. :winkgrin: They know best.

Oh yeah, and wear a helmet.

asterix
May. 27, 2010, 06:34 PM
um, I really think the lessons here are
1. do not get on any horse without a helmet
2. do not get on a green horse you have never ridden without a helmet
3. If you own a green horse, why on earth would you let someone ELSE get on without a helmet.

spot a trend here?

you are very lucky.

twhs
May. 27, 2010, 08:36 PM
I'm glad you're ok. And thank you for reminding all of us to wear our helmets.

valencia
May. 27, 2010, 08:42 PM
um, I really think the lessons here are
1. do not get on any horse without a helmet
2. do not get on a green horse you have never ridden without a helmet
3. If you own a green horse, why on earth would you let someone ELSE get on without a helmet.

spot a trend here?

you are very lucky.

I'm pretty sure she understands the mistakes she made and wasn't exactly asking for them to be repeated to her so condescendingly.

sptraining
May. 27, 2010, 09:29 PM
Glad you're okay and can relay the experience back to us with humor and lesson learned.

Also glad to know you won't be doing that again...sans helmet at least. ;)

mvp
May. 27, 2010, 10:31 PM
Well, in college I hoped on a friend's dressager while wearing biker shorts and Walmart thongs. So bite me.

Anywho, I also like catch riding and I see why you did what you did. And you are right-- sometimes it pays to listen to the horse's regular rider. It sounds like this one knew his horse and knew what he was doing. Not every person who thinks you ride well enough to hop on their greenie actually does know how to do a better job than you-- hence the catch riding invite.

Think of it this way. When God wants you to change your ways, He'll approach you as a good horse trainer. He'll suggest, He'll demand, and then He'll promise. How high God needs to turn up the volume is up to you. He just cranked it up today, that's all.

jumpingmaya
May. 28, 2010, 11:55 AM
Thanks for sharing.. and I've learned the hard way as well... on my friend's horse who bolts when you get on :)
Half way listened the first time... but you can bet I listened the 2nd time!!!! Good that he no longer bolts!!!
Never had the jumping problem... but then again, I ride like a jumper, with an eventing background... that "safety" seat is always stored not too far away!!!
Glad you are ok though!!!! :yes:

alteringwego
May. 28, 2010, 12:08 PM
well hind sight's 20/20. Glad all is ok!

Zipsmom
May. 28, 2010, 01:25 PM
Glad you are OK-- A friend of mine told me that you usually get hurt on someone else's horse:) I expect and prepare for the worst and usually am pleasantly surprised when riding a horse that is not my own.

Shrunk "N" Da Wash
May. 28, 2010, 02:02 PM
I think the lesson is that good freinds should say the horse bucks on landing not ride like Eq :eek:

*Liz*
May. 28, 2010, 02:34 PM
I think the lesson is that good freinds should say the horse bucks on landing not ride like Eq :eek:

This. I don't really care what the horse does, but please give me a fair and clear warning ahead of time so I can be prepared - physically and mentally.

sunnycher
May. 28, 2010, 05:48 PM
Me, now too old to ride other's horses, but don't care how old I am, I wouldn't want to ride a bucker, especially without knowing first. Not so funny.

MistyBlue
May. 28, 2010, 06:06 PM
Hence the hunter perch being form over function. :winkgrin:
Glad to hear you're okay...now remember when riding an unknown horse to *ride* it and not pose. :winkgrin:

2boys
May. 28, 2010, 06:20 PM
[QUOTE=mvp;4892657]Well, in college I hoped on a friend's dressager while wearing biker shorts and Walmart thongs. So bite me.[QUOTE]

:lol:

alto
May. 29, 2010, 01:25 AM
I think the lesson is that good freinds should say the horse bucks on landing not ride like Eq :eek:

But does he actually buck on landing because he's green or is this a saddle fit issue?

Glad you're OK :yes:

doublesstable
May. 29, 2010, 01:34 AM
:lol:
Well, in college I hoped on a friend's dressager while wearing biker shorts and Walmart thongs. So bite me.

Anywho, I also like catch riding and I see why you did what you did. And you are right-- sometimes it pays to listen to the horse's regular rider. It sounds like this one knew his horse and knew what he was doing. Not every person who thinks you ride well enough to hop on their greenie actually does know how to do a better job than you-- hence the catch riding invite.

Think of it this way. When God wants you to change your ways, He'll approach you as a good horse trainer. He'll suggest, He'll demand, and then He'll promise. How high God needs to turn up the volume is up to you. He just cranked it up today, that's all.


This.....
So true...:lol:

Glad your okay.

redears
May. 29, 2010, 05:58 AM
My QH does buck on landing if you are up on his neck, he is built down hill and it's too much up on his front end so he bucks, but I always warn riders... even when they don't listen.

I don't think that's how hunter riders, ride though.. sounds like this dude just bucks if someone doesn't stop him from doing it.

My guy doing his thing, this was a young girl who used to ride him sometimes at my old barn, he really only did it with her but she had a bad tendency to lean forward.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ciLi2YUIWhM

Alterrain
May. 30, 2010, 12:45 AM
My QH does buck on landing if you are up on his neck, he is built down hill and it's too much up on his front end so he bucks, but I always warn riders... even when they don't listen.



^This :)

Horse is this little roly poly Qh hony. Well I learned my lesson! Irony is that he was literally the slowest horse in the world, even AFTER the buck.

cssutton
May. 30, 2010, 08:24 AM
um, I really think the lessons here are
1. do not get on any horse without a helmet
2. do not get on a green horse you have never ridden without a helmet
3. If you own a green horse, why on earth would you let someone ELSE get on without a helmet.

spot a trend here?

you are very lucky.

I have succumbed to the wailings of the wimps and always ride in a helmet.

But the whole thing is totally overblown.

When did helmets become "essential"? The late 1960's or maybe early 1970's? I forget.

If you will look at old photos of horse shows, you will see riders jumping huge fences, much larger than those in the show ring today, with no helmet. Many are either bare headed or wearing the soft English cap.

I do not think there were more injuries in those days than we have today.

I doubt that there are any reliable statistics to prove the point either way but it is my personal opinion that the helmet gives worried nellies peace of mind but do little to change the statistics.

We have all know ior have heard of instances where a helmet would have saved someone, but remember the most frequent fatal or life changing injuries are broken backs and broken necks.

And most riders of today spend way too much time on their horses neck.

CSSJR

klmck63
May. 30, 2010, 12:57 PM
I have succumbed to the wailings of the wimps and always ride in a helmet.

Nice. Really nice. :rolleyes:

Helmets are designed to prevent and decrease severity of TBI and they do. End of story.

cssutton
May. 30, 2010, 01:20 PM
Nice. Really nice. :rolleyes:

Helmets are designed to prevent and decrease severity of TBI and they do. End of story.

Good.

I am glad that you can give me the numbers.

Lets compare the number of deaths and incapacitating head injuries for the years 1930 -1940 vs. 1980-1990.

And since you obviously have the numbers, please include broken necks, broken backs and incapacitating injuries.

My point is/was that although wearing a helmet is a good thing, the benefits from doing so and the penalties for not doing so are not the equivalent of Russian Roulette with only 3 empty chambers as some would insist to be the case.

CSSJR

klmck63
May. 30, 2010, 02:15 PM
Every year the the United States Pony Club issues an Accident Report. USPC began requiring ASTM/SEI approved helmets in 1990. From 1982 to 1989 the percentage of head injuries was 24.2%. In 1992 the percentage of head injuries was 14.3%.

A ten percent drop in head injuries three years is enough for me.

feather river
May. 30, 2010, 03:08 PM
this cannot be a true story, but one of those fact situations you give a class in college to those working on their equestrian degrees...point out all the things done wrong in this situation by both parties...

cssutton
May. 30, 2010, 03:53 PM
What is the ratio of head injuries to broken necks, incapacitating spinal injuries, etc.?

One article I found states "In fact, 31.1% of all riding injuries reported are to the head and face (Nelson, Rivara, Condie, & Smith, 1994; Whitlock, 1999). Nelson, Rivara, and Condie (1994)"

That leaves 69% of the injuries to other parts of the body.

Although it may be a three year decline, the way you present it, it is not.

It is a one year decline against a seven year running average the way you present it.

The years 1990 to 1997 would be comparable.

Your conclusion may be correct, but the numbers need to be looked at it differently to be sure.

Now I don't have any more time for this topic today as this is a busy day for me, but I did hit this link:

http://asci.uvm.edu/equine/law/amea/may96nws.htm#USPC

If you scroll way down to the accidents reported for insurance purposes, you see some pretty interesting numbers.

Injuries to the head were 4%
Neck 1%
Back 6%

So confirming my earlier comment that my observation is that there are more neck and back injuries, the neck and back injuries are almost double the head injuries.

There is no distinction as to severity, so whether more lives are damaged by one or the other is not reflected in these numbers.

Of course, if we had the insurance companies payout on injury classifications, we would be able to duduce the seriousness of each from that.

Nevertheless, inspite of your inaccurate interpretation of my first post, I don't suggest that everyone throw away their helmet.

But I do doubt that we should go into hysterics when one rides without a helmet.

CSSJR