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electric stride
May. 27, 2010, 04:12 PM
I couldn't decide whether to post this here or OC but I decided on both because I kinda wanted the general idea from everyone but then was curious specifically for H/J/EQ people since that's the kind of horse he is and therefore the kind of leasee.

Im looking to half lease out my horse and have found a few potential leasers. He is a great guy 16'2, shown in EQ, Hunters, and 2nd level Dressage. He is sweet kind, etc. And Id really like everyone to be able to see that in him. Now I have a few questions.

What is customary when it comes to showing the horse? How can I accentuate his looks and show potential leasee the ropes/the real him? What is customary protocol on the day[s] leading up to the visit? I have a general idea but I'd like more suggestions.

Also, can anyone tell me their experiences with leasing? I'd also love some sample contracts possibly that I could edit with my own touch? Any and all info on leasing would be great. :]

indygirl2560
May. 27, 2010, 04:40 PM
I've leased several horses(with and without the help of my trainer as far as finding the horse) and here's how they went:
-owner gives me the scoop on the horse(ie what they do, show level, quirks, etc)
-I ride the horse in a lesson with my trainer
-If all goes well in the lesson, then I discuss lease terms with the owner(ie cost, what's covered, is horse allowed off property, how many times a week to hack and jump, etc)

If I'm leasing from someone in my barn, I don't watch the owner ride the horse before I ride(I already know the horse on the ground and have seen the owner handle/ride); however, if I'm leasing from some outside party, I treat it as if I'm looking at the horse to purchase(like I watch the owner tack up, ride, etc).

As far as telling the potential leasee your horse's faults, be honest. You don't want you, your horse, or the leasee getting into trouble later on due to things you didn't disclose. Also, make sure you cover who pays for what(shoes, injury, etc) and the feeding schedule/what horse eats(if your horse is taken to another barn). Are you leasing to someone in your barn or outside?

meupatdoes
May. 27, 2010, 04:52 PM
I couldn't decide whether to post this here or OC but I decided on both because I kinda wanted the general idea from everyone but then was curious specifically for H/J/EQ people since that's the kind of horse he is and therefore the kind of leasee.

Im looking to half lease out my horse and have found a few potential leasers. He is a great guy 16'2, shown in EQ, Hunters, and 2nd level Dressage. He is sweet kind, etc. And Id really like everyone to be able to see that in him. Now I have a few questions.

What is customary when it comes to showing the horse? How can I accentuate his looks and show potential leasee the ropes/the real him? What is customary protocol on the day[s] leading up to the visit? I have a general idea but I'd like more suggestions.

Also, can anyone tell me their experiences with leasing? I'd also love some sample contracts possibly that I could edit with my own touch? Any and all info on leasing would be great. :]

Number one he needs a bath before they come, early enough that he is DRY when they come (keep in mind that people like to play "gotcha!" and show up an hour early).

For a hunter I would stick with a black or white saddle pad, and black polos (possibly dark brown for a chestnut) or black eskadron type deals or leather boots.
If anyone dressage is looking at him white polos are a must. I do not think my last lease horse would have leased without white polos; he looked way better in them.

I would use a bridle with a very simple bit, and possibly a standing martingale.


The horse is spotless, the tack is spotless and waiting by the grooming stall, the aisle is swept, ideally the arena is dragged, and the best impression is made if you can be found sitting idly in the office when they show up so no one thinks you are "prepping" the horse.


Practice doing your "demo ride" in the days before they come. You will probably have 15 minutes to do your flat routine and jump some courses. If you normally don't start jumping until minute 40 both you and your horse will need to practice stepping in the arena doing a little walkyins, flatting briefly, and then hopping around the sticks pronto.

Of course the more you are able to show off how little you need to ride him or babysit him the better.

STA
May. 27, 2010, 05:08 PM
To show your horse to a potential lessee turn him out as if he were going to a horse show except braiding. I would ask the person trying him what they would like you to do or not do with prior to riding the horse. Example: Do you ride the horse? Do you lunge the horse? Turn him out? Etc.

More importantly, I would sit down with the person leasing the horse and decide all the important questions - days you ride days they ride, days off for the horse - How many days the horse jumps which are your days which are their days - If the horse is injured in a paddock what happens - If the horse is injured while riding what happens - Is the lease for a certain time or month to month. So many questions, cover all of them. Things will go smoothly until there is a problem, then you want to have the answers clear and written on paper and signed.

Good Luck

electric stride
May. 27, 2010, 05:50 PM
It would be someone outside my barn.

electric stride
May. 27, 2010, 05:52 PM
Would you say better to clean them and put them back in their stall for potential leasee to also groom or just groom myself....If you were coming to try out a horse how much do you want the owner to do and how much do you want to see for yourself?

Also, what is a good time frame for the actual ride? I'm assuming about an hour would suffice. I've had experiences where people just keeping walking around in circles for two+ hours! :lol:

joiedevie99
May. 27, 2010, 06:02 PM
I would have him groomed and ready to go at the appointed time. If they are bringing their trainer, they may not have time to wait around while you do everything.

I would budget 20 minutes for your riding, and 30-40 minutes for them riding.

When you are done, tell them to please let you know if they are interested and the rider can come back for a second ride, including grooming, tacking, whatever else they want to see (maybe hacking him outside).