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sonomacounty
May. 21, 2010, 10:23 PM
Is this OTTB sound or off? And what else do you think of him?

Am I seeing something in his hind end?

http://horseadoption.com/wendlar/

Thanks.

theinstigator
May. 21, 2010, 10:24 PM
Is this OTTB sound or off? And what else do you think of him?

Am I seeing something in his hind end?

http://horseadoption.com/thoroughbred-adoption/

Thanks.
Which horse? That's the link to the whole list ;)

sonomacounty
May. 21, 2010, 10:26 PM
Wow, fast, instigator. I just put it up and then saw that I had to fix the link. Tx.

sonomacounty
May. 21, 2010, 10:28 PM
Oh, click on where it says "more information" (or something like that), then click on the video. Sorry.

theinstigator
May. 21, 2010, 10:37 PM
Haha sorry I'm enjoying a beer and a night out of lurking....it's slow in here so I'm quick to read the first thread :)

There is something definitely off with his right hind. Stifle perhaps? Hard to tell as he's still "running" at the trot.

2tempe
May. 21, 2010, 10:47 PM
i agree, right hind is short; it also looks to me like his hocks are big/puffy or something. He looks like a nice steady guy, going well especially since he's just off the track, and like he would be a willing learner of new stuff.

sonomacounty
May. 21, 2010, 10:58 PM
O.K., that's what I thought.

Darn, this one gets under my skin (in a good way, that is).

For some eye candy, click on some of the photos of him which blows them up a bit. You'll see what I mean.

tidy rabbit
May. 21, 2010, 11:00 PM
It may just be that his back is killing him from the monkey in the saddle pounding away on it.

Bogie
May. 21, 2010, 11:00 PM
He's in amazing shape for a horse that raced 105 times!

yes, he's off but I'd want a vet's opinion on why before I passed on him. He's still go that egg beater trot that a lot have coming off the track which isn't helping.

For $200 there's room for maintenance.

The horses tough enough to survive that many races generally can survive almost anything.

Calamber
May. 21, 2010, 11:06 PM
I see off as in head bobbing on the right front, may be related to his hind but he does not stride out in the front either. Does he have shoes on?

shalomypony
May. 22, 2010, 07:39 AM
I also see something right front....looks totally body sore as well.

judybigredpony
May. 22, 2010, 07:58 AM
Several things to ponder.

Has he had his hocks done ever??? Is he going with out shoes behind for the first time? since it appears bi-lateral. His sacrum/siatic are tight...from racing? Sore hocks and or stifles?
Jumping out of the gate and dragging yourself around a relativey flat hardsurface for 8 years of your life would trash your knees a bit.
Worth a vet work up at his price and perhaps some maintanace.
Also if he is still shod behind the toe grabs no matter how small will make them jam up behind.

enjoytheride
May. 22, 2010, 08:53 AM
The price of his adoption definetly reflects his soundness. I noticed that he isn't even on full turnout yet since it said they are getting him used to being outside.

kfildes
May. 22, 2010, 09:22 AM
My goodness tidy rabbit was that really necessary to post on a public forum.

Linny
May. 22, 2010, 09:28 AM
He does look wonky, but he doesn't have the sour appearance of a horse that's really uncomfortable. His ears are up and he's kind of checking things out. He looks like a nice dude.

Some old track horses develop "limpy" action even though they are not actually in pain, just as a person with (say) and old knee injury always has a bit of a limp, even when the knee doesn't hurt.

For the price, I'd at least check him out and have a vet go over him. If you know one, get a vet who has worked with horses transitioning off the track. Remember, horses on the track are used to really USING their muscles, in quick, explosive bursts. The idea of just trotting slowly about is not really familiar and as such they need to retrain the muscles how to work slowly. During the transition they can go through some wonky stages, especially behind.

Aerial
May. 22, 2010, 09:46 AM
My goodness tidy rabbit was that really necessary to post on a public forum.

I'm sure she probably wouldn't have, except that it does contribute to how sound the horse exactly is, and therefore whether OP should pass or not.

MintHillFarm
May. 22, 2010, 09:48 AM
He's in amazing shape for a horse that raced 105 times!

yes, he's off but I'd want a vet's opinion on why before I passed on him. He's still go that egg beater trot that a lot have coming off the track which isn't helping.

For $200 there's room for maintenance.

The horses tough enough to survive that many races generally can survive almost anything.

I agree...I couldn't quite pinpoint where he is most uncomfortable - front end or hind. He, to me, moves like an older horse that has had miles. This just may be him.

I wouldn't rule him out and if you are serious, I'd have a vet look at him.

Sing Mia Song
May. 22, 2010, 10:03 AM
I had one off the track who went like this, and he had chronic sacroilliac issues. Injections, chiro and massage could get him right for about a day, but the explosive action of breaking from the gate had created just too much damage for him. In addition, he had some serious locking stifles. A month of trail rides over hill and dale helped that, but he had to be kept in constant work to maintain it.

Oh, and I don't think the monkey has anything to do with the way he's going. In fact, having ridden this type of gait, it feels very, very weird underneath you. She looks tense, and she's posting off the back of the saddle, but I don't think she's landing all that hard on him. I do note, however, that he swishes his tail in the corners at the canter when she sits down on him.

If you can afford to take this one on, knowing it may not work out, go for it. But I'm pretty leery of him.

lesson junkie
May. 22, 2010, 10:29 AM
He hasn't been off the track for a full month yet-I bet he gets better.

Does anyone know who photographs those horses? They sure do a great job.

jetsmom
May. 22, 2010, 11:08 AM
A lot of times they are body sore coming off the track. It's possible he had his shoes pulled behind and he's footsore. He might be coming off of something given at the track and they usually crash and look and feel like crap about a month or so later.
He looks like a good guy, so I'd at least check him out.

And whoever photographs for them does do an amazing job!

Come Shine
May. 22, 2010, 11:42 AM
This just may be him.

I wouldn't rule him out and if you are serious, I'd have a vet look at him.

Wow - he could be the twin to my friend's horse, right down to the little tail. Her TB moves just like this. She's had him for ages, shows lower level jumpers and events, and he is a blast to ride.

Agree with MHF, looks like a horse worth a look and a vetting. Good luck!

whbar158
May. 22, 2010, 02:24 PM
I would say a vetting wouldn't hurt then some down time, he as only been off the track since the 3rd, he just needs some time before you can really judge him undersaddle really well. I really liked his canter his trot was pretty blah but again I think it is hard to judge him while he is pretty much still track fit and muscled and not muscled for anything else.

Bogie
May. 22, 2010, 03:05 PM
I would say a vetting wouldn't hurt then some down time, he as only been off the track since the 3rd, he just needs some time before you can really judge him undersaddle really well. I really liked his canter his trot was pretty blah but again I think it is hard to judge him while he is pretty much still track fit and muscled and not muscled for anything else.

My OTTB had a trot like a sewing machine when he first came off the track. Now I get compliments about what a great mover he is. I just don't judge the trot until they've rebalanced. And my boy was $300 so sometimes price is not an indicator of future performance.

However, with a horse like that I'd want a really good vet to look him over and I'd do films of his front feet, ankles, hocks and maybe his stifles.

MintHillFarm
May. 22, 2010, 03:11 PM
The photos and website in general are excellent...

With so little time off the track, I think he will get better. He was very well mannered and could only improve. I do not think the rider had anything to do with his way of going.

crazyhorses
May. 22, 2010, 04:12 PM
Right hind looks really... odd. He seems to lift it up a lot more than the other hind leg.

AndNirina
May. 22, 2010, 04:54 PM
I like him, he seems like a very good guy in general and would be worth vetting. Something is definitely off right hind, though. I don't see so much in front, but he's hitchy behind. I'd definitely have his stifles/hocks looked into before I made any decisions about him. To me he just seems body sore and stiff as a board, like he would have a hard time doing any lateral work.

In time, and especially with some downtime, body work/chiro and correct riding he may turn out to be a really nice guy. He seems to have held up through many, many races but it just depends on the amount of wear and tear that 10 years on the track has truly done to his hind end.

AndNirina
May. 22, 2010, 05:00 PM
I watched the video one last time after I posted and while I'm definitely not a vet by any means, it looks stifle-ish to me, especially since he kind of drags his toe RH. I just went through a stifle surgery with my mare... sort of have a hunch as to what that funny movement looks like.

Bisoux
May. 22, 2010, 05:09 PM
right stifle looks swollen takes a few off steps, but not really consistently BAD. If you're looking for something cheap then I'd say go for it and try, but you might end up with more vet bills than you bargained for.

So soon off the track there may just be soreness, but I'd worry about the fact that he's been on the track for so long, any damage done is probably too far gone to 'heal' anymore.

JKTaLu
May. 22, 2010, 05:21 PM
I found this on their common questions page. Am I reading this correctly, no vet check allowed?

Can I Have A Horse Vet Checked?
Retiring racehorses come to New Vocations with a variety of injuries; occupational hazards of racing. Most will heal sufficiently for general use with time away from the track. These are adoption horses, not an item to be bought or sold with a “guarantee.” They should be viewed as a gift, not a purchase. The horses were under a veterinarian’s care at the track and have been professionally evaluated by the former trainer and the New Vocations’ staff. If this is not sufficient, then individuals are encouraged to seek their horse elsewhere.

Paragon
May. 22, 2010, 05:39 PM
Their vet check policy has been discussed on the boards before, and it seemed that the general consensus from folks who'd worked with and adopted from New Vocations is that there's enough quality and integrity in New Vocations that it isn't really an issue. They're good at what they do and disclose all known information about the horse.

Gestalt
May. 22, 2010, 06:15 PM
He moves like an old schoolie I rode hunters on. The horse felt like a bag of cement, but he was never lame. Some of the large ponies at the barn had a bigger stride than he did. :D

I get their point about vet check, it's an adoption, not a purchase.

JKTaLu
May. 22, 2010, 06:26 PM
Interesting, well they must be good at what they do as 330 adoptions a year is nothing to sneeze at.

lyndaelyzoo
May. 23, 2010, 01:37 AM
It looks like this horse has symptoms of stringhalt.

enjoytheride
May. 23, 2010, 08:04 AM
This organization does extensive vetting on their horses before they put them up for adoption, in addition if you buy the horse you can take it home, ride it for a month, and vet it all you want. Then you can return it within a certain amount of time for a 100% money back guarantee. You can't beat that with a stick.

horseladi78
May. 23, 2010, 10:29 AM
I'm with Lyn... looks like string halt to me as well.

FineAlready
May. 23, 2010, 04:17 PM
I have not read any of the other comments so as to avoid tainting my response. He appears to be intermittently lame on the left front, particularly when that leg is to the outside. That is consistent with a suspensory injury, in my experience. So is working out of it, which he appears to do toward the end.

He's also still very tracky, which can make him a little harder to assess. At times, he is attempting to break to a canter, which can be simply a sign of hotness, or potentially a sign of lameness.

He's cute, though...may be worth having a vet take a look at him.

annamford
May. 23, 2010, 07:37 PM
I'm glad to see so many people taking a look at our Wendlar. He truly is a sweet boy. Although I don't have time to answer all the questions there are a couple things I would like to mention. The video taken was about his 6th ride since he arrived. He is definitely body sore and a bit foot sore. He has front shoes on but his hind shoes have been pulled. This is the first time he has been barefoot for probably 8 years. He most likely will not be able to compete at a high level but considering he ran 105 times and has fairly clean legs is amazing. He is the perfect horse for someone wanting a pleasure mount or someone that wants to play around with doing lower level dressage. At New Vocations we do allow vet checks but on a horse that has done as much as him what you see is what you get.

Again, I'm glad to see so many people sharing their imput and past experiences with retired racehorses. Feel free to e-mail or call us anytime
www.horseadoption.com

Anna

Roser123
May. 23, 2010, 08:16 PM
He's off on his right hind and I would say it's his stifle (?) - he might be a great horse with a little R&R and maintance, though.
Regardless of whether he's free or not, it's only prudent to know what you're getting into beforehand, IMHO - I would definately have a vet look at him before I brought him home,

LaraNSpeedy
May. 23, 2010, 08:30 PM
1. He acts like a horse that is going barefoot for the first time but I could be wrong - its like his feet are ouchy.

2. He is also stiff. But I have retrained a LOT of exracers - over 100 and I have seen a lot of exracers carry stiff esp if they raced over 100 times like he has. He is only 10 but he is probably a little more like 14 in his joints. He could be a super horse with the right TLC.

3. It says he came off the track 2-3 weeks ago. HELLO? Let's give him a little more time off (IMHO) and maybe just ride him a little on the trail - and then I would restart him with a LOT of bendy work - stretching down and bending at the rib cage.

LauraKY
May. 23, 2010, 08:51 PM
We retrain OTTBs. My daughter's favorite horse was 10 when he came off the track with 91 starts, won over $350,000. He had an abscess in a hind foot, but we took a chance on him. Did run a simple PPE, he flexed sound. Best decision ever. Never a lame day since we've owned him. He does seem to be more susceptible than any of the others to infections (suspect he was on steroids for an extended period). He is schooling 2nd level dressage and is absolutely amazing. And boy, does he strut his stuff for an audience. The funny thing is, we probably wouldn't have taken a chance on him now...and we would have missed the horse of a lifetime!

We gave him 6 months off intentionally, then another 6 because my daughter became seriously ill. Best decision ever. He was turned out in a 10 acre pasture with a buddy. Stabled at night/day depending on the weather. He will never be a 24/7 turnout horse, loves his stall too much, but he also loves his turnout.

Sancudo
May. 23, 2010, 09:07 PM
It looks like this horse has symptoms of stringhalt.

Our horse with a torn meniscus in the stifle looks like a classic stringhalt, in one leg. I'm thinking stifle.

doublesstable
May. 23, 2010, 10:21 PM
Our horse with a torn meniscus in the stifle looks like a classic stringhalt, in one leg. I'm thinking stifle.

I'm with you guys.... right hind.

It really depends on what you want to do with this horse... may be cheap but feed is not...

There are many OTTB's that find a wonderful place to spend their years - he is very cute and think it's great that this organization finds good homes for these horses that have worked so hard for their previous owners.

If he is a fit for you - then it's a good idea.

Most horses do need some sort of management if they are in the care of humans... ;)

Hauwse
May. 24, 2010, 08:14 AM
Interesting.

It would be nice to see him in person, but the first thing I see is that he may very well be a little sickle hocked. Though he is stood up very well if you look at the left hind he is very straight from the hock all the way down, no angle change from his ankle on down. Sometimes when they have this conformation they peddle(look like they are riding a bike) a little behind.

Second he is just off the track, many, many of them are a little "stabby". Generally a combination of general soreness issues, and they tend to get over it after a honest let down. This guy with over a 100 races under his belt has run two maybe three horses racing careers, and probably needs a good long rest, allowed to get fat and happy, and slowly come back.

I am not seeing string halt, in my experience even mild stringhalt is pretty clear.

As a general comment, this horse has had a career or two already, we can't expect more than that from any horse in any discipline, and we should not expect to find our next GP horse coming off the track after 100 races. To me he looks like a great guy, one you might want to take trail rides, allow to be a pasture buddy that gets all the attention in the world.

At the adoption price let him down for a year, and let him dictate what he wants to do after that. If he ends up in the ring great, if not enjoy his company, and the reward that comes from being a true caregiver.

Phaxxton
May. 24, 2010, 08:48 AM
I'm glad to see so many people taking a look at our Wendlar. He truly is a sweet boy. Although I don't have time to answer all the questions there are a couple things I would like to mention. The video taken was about his 6th ride since he arrived. He is definitely body sore and a bit foot sore. He has front shoes on but his hind shoes have been pulled. This is the first time he has been barefoot for probably 8 years. He most likely will not be able to compete at a high level but considering he ran 105 times and has fairly clean legs is amazing. He is the perfect horse for someone wanting a pleasure mount or someone that wants to play around with doing lower level dressage. At New Vocations we do allow vet checks but on a horse that has done as much as him what you see is what you get.

Again, I'm glad to see so many people sharing their imput and past experiences with retired racehorses. Feel free to e-mail or call us anytime
www.horseadoption.com (http://www.horseadoption.com)

Anna

Quoting for those who missed it.

I would hope in the future if people have questions of this nature that they would contact New Vocations for answers. I have adopted from them and they are exceedingly honest -- and always happy to talk about the horses they have available. IME, if they 'missed' something related to a horse's soundness or health (which is doubtful in my mind), they would want to know. :yes:

FTR (and I have posted a lot about this), I had a great experience adopting my STB through New Vocations and wouldn't hesitate to adopt through them again in the future. :yes: They are nice, honest, hardworking people who often have really, really nice horses available.

caffeinated
May. 24, 2010, 08:52 AM
I can't see the video here but from the comments would say what people are seeing is probably fairly normal. Some foot and body soreness is pretty standard, especially after such a long career. Additionally we see a lot of horses that look a little odd in the right hind, and MOST of the time that works itseld out with time.

For sure it can be something more serious or more difficult to rehab, but the people working with the horse would have the best feel for that :)

DMK
May. 24, 2010, 09:11 AM
I'm glad to see so many people taking a look at our Wendlar. He truly is a sweet boy. Although I don't have time to answer all the questions there are a couple things I would like to mention. The video taken was about his 6th ride since he arrived. He is definitely body sore and a bit foot sore. He has front shoes on but his hind shoes have been pulled. This is the first time he has been barefoot for probably 8 years. He most likely will not be able to compete at a high level but considering he ran 105 times and has fairly clean legs is amazing. He is the perfect horse for someone wanting a pleasure mount or someone that wants to play around with doing lower level dressage. At New Vocations we do allow vet checks but on a horse that has done as much as him what you see is what you get.

Again, I'm glad to see so many people sharing their imput and past experiences with retired racehorses. Feel free to e-mail or call us anytime
www.horseadoption.com

Anna


This.

And a word of caution for people evaluating horses fresh off the track. They just don't trot like they can or will. Wonky Trot is just part of the game and the reason why some people get the "good" OTTBs is not because they find the ones that don't have Wonky Trot, it's that they can see through Wonky Trot for the underlying potential (but if it were easy, a lot more people could do it ;) )

He ran 105 times, he probably was no where near the top of his game by the time he had a need to end up in an adoption program, he's understandably body sore, he's left the perfectly groomed footing of his former world, and he's a stall walker that hasn't been transitioned to extended turnout yet (it takes time). Being a stall walker means he probably walks in one direction. Think about it. A big horse in a 12X12 space 24 hours a day. He is out of his stall approx 1 hour for galloping and cooling out. Then for the other 23 hours he can walk to the left or right, but only in one direction (that's the nature of the vice). Even if he is intermittent, he could easily get about 2-3 hours of muscle memory built daily. Turning. In a 12x12 space. A big horse. Realistically don't you think that alone could create gait and muscling abnormality? Have you ever seen a big horse turn a circle in his stall and not get a short stab with the inside leg?

All you should be judging this early off the track is his attitude and overall where are the "to be worked on" issues. For instance, if I see a stall walker, I know critical to his success is to do what NV is already doing - transitioning him to more turnout to help him develop even muscling and gait at other speeds than gallop. If my set up doesn't allow a LOT of turnout then I should pass.

dags
May. 24, 2010, 11:33 AM
This.

And a word of caution for people evaluating horses fresh off the track. They just don't trot like they can or will. Wonky Trot is just part of the game and the reason why some people get the "good" OTTBs is not because they find the ones that don't have Wonky Trot, it's that they can see through Wonky Trot for the underlying potential (but if it were easy, a lot more people could do it ;) )

He ran 105 times, he probably was no where near the top of his game by the time he had a need to end up in an adoption program, he's understandably body sore, he's left the perfectly groomed footing of his former world, and he's a stall walker that hasn't been transitioned to extended turnout yet (it takes time). Being a stall walker means he probably walks in one direction. Think about it. A big horse in a 12X12 space 24 hours a day. He is out of his stall approx 1 hour for galloping and cooling out. Then for the other 23 hours he can walk to the left or right, but only in one direction (that's the nature of the vice). Even if he is intermittent, he could easily get about 2-3 hours of muscle memory built daily. Turning. In a 12x12 space. A big horse. Realistically don't you think that alone could create gait and muscling abnormality? Have you ever seen a big horse turn a circle in his stall and not get a short stab with the inside leg?

All you should be judging this early off the track is his attitude and overall where are the "to be worked on" issues. For instance, if I see a stall walker, I know critical to his success is to do what NV is already doing - transitioning him to more turnout to help him develop even muscling and gait at other speeds than gallop. If my set up doesn't allow a LOT of turnout then I should pass.

No sense in repeating what has already been said, but this is a great post.

alteringwego
May. 24, 2010, 12:37 PM
Looks like SI pain to me. He is over flexing hocks and short in stifles to avoid moving low back. Over all he is very body sore and could certainly use a good bit of vet/chiro/acupuncture help. But for $200....

foursocks
May. 24, 2010, 12:43 PM
My guy traveled so close behind when I got him, three months off the track, that he had scars on his ankles from kicking himself. Conformationally he shouldn't do that, so it was pretty much a case of weak stifles and very little topline strength. A lot of reconditioning and strength-building, including jumper dressage, means that now he only interferes when he is cold, stiff, or stressed.

He also used to look lame when he trotted- we called it his shuffle- and now I have dressage people complimenting me on his movement. This makes me laugh a lot, but the point is to reiterate that they often look wonky coming off the track.

It's important to be able to evaluate soundness, obviously, but there are some flexibilities that should be built in to that evaluation!

tidy rabbit
May. 24, 2010, 01:38 PM
It may just be that his back is killing him from the monkey in the saddle pounding away on it.


My goodness tidy rabbit was that really necessary to post on a public forum.

I don't see what was so terrible about that comment. It was a lot nicer than what went through my mind when I saw the video.

I could have wrote a very long and polite suggestion that perhaps the rider was having a negative impact on the horse by the way it carries itself in the tack, and went off into great detail as to why. But all that would be a waste of bandwidth because it wouldn't matter to anyone and I am a rabbit of short sentences and few words, in general.

So, if my lack of tact in regards to some absolutely atrocious riding offends you, please, by all means, put me on ignore.

dags
May. 24, 2010, 02:04 PM
perhaps the rider was having a negative impact on the horse by the way it carries itself in the tack.

This would have probably worked just as well. And I don't want to put you on ignore! I like you, but I did feel the monkey comment was a little undeserved. I've had the (not so much) privilege of riding a similar trot and good-grief it rides as atrocious as it looks. There is no back, so when you go to sit you . . . keep . . . going . . . down, and then there is no impulsion (because his hind end is in a neighboring zip code) to push you back up. I see her trying to get over his withers and off his back, but there is no suspension and not a lot of horse to hold onto with your leg, so this requires an insane amount of balance and strength. I will say that I extremely dislike the way her saddle fits her, forcing her knee down and over her toe, making it extremely difficult to get into the heel and lower calf, and I think that could probably cause a lot of what you are seeing.

That's my physical explanation. My semantic one is that I (personally) would be uncomfortable chastising some random exercise rider for a rescue group - especially one that very much seems to put the finishing touches on everything it does, including a nicely outfitted rider and a clean, attractive setting for the video. I assume they don't have people lined up to try out for their riding team, they're probably happy to get someone with at least solid basics and an english background. Now, the people that call themselves professionals, take money, and live by the motto 'do as i say, not as i do??' call them monkeys all you want :D

dani0303
May. 24, 2010, 02:19 PM
I'm going to mirror what everybody else has said. With a career like that and just barely into his letdown time, it's hard to truly evaluate his potential. He is quite handsome and nicely put together. I would get an extensive PPE then just turn him out for 6 months and reevaluate. The adoption fee is minimal so as long as you can afford to keep him, why not?

sonomacounty
May. 24, 2010, 05:34 PM
Here's his breeding:

http://www.equineline.com/Free-5X-Pedigree.cfm?page_state=ORDER_AND_CONFIRM&reference_number=5687178&registry=T&horse_name=Wendlar&dam_name=Naturally%20Royal&foaling_year=2000&nicking_stats_indicator=N

What do you think?

sonomacounty
May. 24, 2010, 05:41 PM
I do so wish I was in the position to take him but I don't think I am. I hope New Vocations does not mind him being discussed. Hopefully, this may help him find a great home.

I like his canter, his elegant look, level head, . . . hopefully his trot would work itself out. He seems like one special guy.

imapepper
May. 24, 2010, 06:08 PM
Very cute horse. I think that a good deal of this is coming from being body sore and simply not having the topline muscle to care himself yet. Huge difference (not suprising) between going to the left and right. Especially in the canter. But again....he has been turning left at the canter for a very long time ;) He doesn't want to push off with that right hind. He might well have some issues but until I spoke with their vet and saw it in person, it's hard to say what the issues are.

I think he is a nice guy who seems really pretty quiet. And at his age and experience level, could be a really solid performer at the appropriate level. With the right turnout, shoeing and exercise program, this might be a really cool guy :cool: Hopefully someone in the area will give them a call and give him a chance :)

And to New Vocations....thanks for what you guys do :) You rock!!!!!

sonomacounty
May. 24, 2010, 07:52 PM
Aww, how nice. Found this on the web:

Local Affiliate News for Finger Lakes HBPA

Annual Awards
11/15/2007 12:43:45 PM - The Horsemen's Journal - Winter 2007

The Finger Lakes Horsemen’s Benevolent & Protective Association held its annual awards dinner on November 10, 2007 at the Burgundy Basin Inn. Each year, the horsemen’s association recognizes horses that had an outstanding year at our racetrack and honors them at the annual awards ceremony.

The following is a list of Thoroughbreds that have provided local racing enthusiasts with exciting performances throughout the 2007 season:

Category - Horse - Owner - Trainer

$6,250 - $8,000 CLM Colt/Horse/Gelding - Wendlar - Gilda Sayles/Shelia Englehart - Chris Englehart

Link it came from:
http://www.hbpa.org/NewsDisplay.asp?section=2&type=l&Affid=8

S1969
May. 24, 2010, 10:47 PM
This would have probably worked just as well. And I don't That's my physical explanation. My semantic one is that I (personally) would be uncomfortable chastising some random exercise rider for a rescue group - especially one that very much seems to put the finishing touches on everything it does, including a nicely outfitted rider and a clean, attractive setting for the video. I assume they don't have people lined up to try out for their riding team, they're probably happy to get someone with at least solid basics and an english background. Now, the people that call themselves professionals, take money, and live by the motto 'do as i say, not as i do??' call them monkeys all you want :D

:) Well said.

I think the horse looks a little off in the right hind; but with that many starts and only a few weeks off it would seem reasonable. See what the vet has to say about the cause(s).

SuperSTB
May. 24, 2010, 11:04 PM
He's got potential. He certainly moves like OTTB fresh into a new job. I would certainly give him a couple months lay-up before asking him to change to a new job however- most of the OTTB's do so much better in training that way.

Think of this rider's position/weight/tack vs. a jockey. He looks like he's still trying to figure out this new change. If he also is sans shoes- he might be adjusting to that as well.

TSWJB
May. 24, 2010, 11:24 PM
I watched the video one last time after I posted and while I'm definitely not a vet by any means, it looks stifle-ish to me, especially since he kind of drags his toe RH. I just went through a stifle surgery with my mare... sort of have a hunch as to what that funny movement looks like.

i agree. the horse looks like he has something with his stifles. and if they pulled the shoes it could aggravate the stifle until he gets used to having lower heals. i rode a horse that had a stifle issue for awhile. he felt funny behind and it made you feel like you had to really rise out of the tack because you would fall into the tack with the stifle not working properly. i worked the horse for 2 months and he felt great and became sound. but it took a good 2 months of working the horse at least 4 or 5 times a week. i worked him in big circles. no tight circles. and just strengthened him and after awhile he felt normal.

annamford
Jun. 1, 2010, 03:35 PM
We just posted a new video of Wendlar today. Here is a bit of history to help some of you all watching his video. Wendlar arrived at New Vocations on 5/3 directly from the track, just a week after his last race. The first video was from 5/20. The new video was taken to 6/1. He is starting to loosen up a bit and move more freely. Obviously with 105 starts he still needs more time. I'm happy to see so much interest in him. Feel free to spread the word. He needs to find a good home.

New video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLYE-DLWuSQ


More info on Wendlar go to http://horseadoption.com/wendlar/

sonomacounty
Jun. 1, 2010, 05:51 PM
Thanks Anna.

He does look better in most of the video and I'm so very glad.

If my son were not so young, I'd have to have this horse. He's a magnificent beauty, typey looks, level head and a neat resume.

I really do hope he gets a great home. He's such a cool guy.

And - Bless you for what you do. Please do keep us updated on him.

eritzhaupt
Jun. 18, 2010, 03:10 AM
I thought this horse was nice enough to buy, so I did. I watched him free in an arena and undersaddle. He has a good conformation, his legs are clean and he has a well developed topline and hind quarters. I too first thought he looked off behind, but decided finally it is his shoulders. His selling point is his calm personality, he seemed happy to do the work, if he was having pain he gave no indication. I'm gambling on chiropractic work and lateral work to eventally loosen him up and some Devil's claw won't hurt either (his joints have had some abuse).I hope I'm right.

lesson junkie
Jun. 18, 2010, 08:18 AM
I think he's gonna be fine, especially after seeing the 2nd video.

Congrats and good luck with him!

caffeinated
Jun. 18, 2010, 08:27 AM
I thought this horse was nice enough to buy, so I did.

Congratulations!

sonomacounty
Jun. 18, 2010, 09:16 AM
Oh, Eritz - you lucky, lucky person. As you know, I ADORE, ADORE, ADORE this horse.

Please keep us updated.

He seems like one super special guy - majestic, intelligent, typey, smart, easy going, compliant, . . .

Congrats.

dwblover
Jun. 18, 2010, 06:28 PM
Personality trumps all! Congrats on your adorable new horse. I think he's going to be an amazing partner for you!!

MelantheLLC
Jun. 18, 2010, 06:49 PM
This looks like a horse who will be worth his weight in gold. Good luck to both of you!

MintHillFarm
Jun. 19, 2010, 07:14 AM
SO GREAT!! Made my weekend to hear this!:)

MintHillFarm
Jun. 19, 2010, 07:15 AM
This.

And a word of caution for people evaluating horses fresh off the track. They just don't trot like they can or will. Wonky Trot is just part of the game and the reason why some people get the "good" OTTBs is not because they find the ones that don't have Wonky Trot, it's that they can see through Wonky Trot for the underlying potential (but if it were easy, a lot more people could do it ;) )

He ran 105 times, he probably was no where near the top of his game by the time he had a need to end up in an adoption program, he's understandably body sore, he's left the perfectly groomed footing of his former world, and he's a stall walker that hasn't been transitioned to extended turnout yet (it takes time). Being a stall walker means he probably walks in one direction. Think about it. A big horse in a 12X12 space 24 hours a day. He is out of his stall approx 1 hour for galloping and cooling out. Then for the other 23 hours he can walk to the left or right, but only in one direction (that's the nature of the vice). Even if he is intermittent, he could easily get about 2-3 hours of muscle memory built daily. Turning. In a 12x12 space. A big horse. Realistically don't you think that alone could create gait and muscling abnormality? Have you ever seen a big horse turn a circle in his stall and not get a short stab with the inside leg?

All you should be judging this early off the track is his attitude and overall where are the "to be worked on" issues. For instance, if I see a stall walker, I know critical to his success is to do what NV is already doing - transitioning him to more turnout to help him develop even muscling and gait at other speeds than gallop. If my set up doesn't allow a LOT of turnout then I should pass.

Very well said.