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View Full Version : Please educate me on Western saddles! (I FOUND ONE!)



Justmyluck
May. 19, 2010, 09:55 AM
Ok so hopefully someone here knows something!

So basically I have a horse who I need to start venturing out on to introduce him to new things. We have been doing lots of desenstization on the ground but for him that doesnt corrilate to much to undersaddle. He is a spooker the spin and run away type. My saddle is an old super slick stubben while I can ride most problems in it this saddle, not this one im not.

I want something secure to help hold me in place, to give me a better fighting chance persay. All I know so far about western is that people think he needs semi-QH bars because he is narrow for his breed, 1/2 Welsh cob and is six so he is done growing.

Seat size for me? No clue
Skirt types? I think round cause he has a short back?
Seat type? Secure please!
Brand name? Noo freaking clue

Help! I do though know how to cinch one up but thats about it. :yes:

Rebelpaintrider
May. 19, 2010, 10:12 AM
my suggestion if you want a secure seat... go for a barrel saddle (or a roper) but barrel saddles have a nice deep seat. Western saddles tend to run a little bigger than english, so I'd go down a half to a full size seat.

Brand names don't really matter in my opinion, but If I was going to spend the money to get a western, I'd go for what I wanted. I like Circle Y, Billy Cook, But there are a lot out there, try a few and see what feels better to you.

I also agree with Semi-QH bars.

Hope this kind of helps. Also I may add, if you get a western saddle, make sure it has a bucking strap! They will save you! and your saddle from coming up off the horses back, the bucking strap is the strap that goes behind the cinch around the horses belly, it holds the back half of the saddle to the horse. They are a godsend! Trust me :lol:

Hope this helped!
-T

Dramapony_misty
May. 19, 2010, 10:23 AM
I started off western so I may be able to help a bit...
First of all, what seat size is your Stubben? This may help determine what size seat to look for in western. For example, I take a 17" jumping saddle, but my western saddle is 15". You also have to take into consideration the thickness of your thighs since you have to be able to comfortably fit between the pommel and the cantle.

Skirt...this will also depend on your seat size. The smaller the seat size, the more room you will have for a skirt. A picture of your horse may help.

Seat type...suede or synthetic suede.

Brand name: this all depends upon fit and what you are looking for. If you are just looking for a "training"/trail saddle, the synthetics are pretty nice..Wintec, Weaver, Abetta, Big horn, and King Series.
For leather, my current show saddle is a Circle Y. I have also ridden in some nice Bona Allen, Big Horn, TexTan, and Simco saddles.

If what you're really looking for is a saddle that will sort of help lock you in, you may want to check out the Aussie stock saddles (http://www.downunderweb.com/intro.htm). The deep seat and big "pommel flaps" (called poleys) really keep you secure and as long as your legs stay tight to the saddle, it's near impossible to be tossed off. I have one of these too (with the horn) and I have yet to be dislodged. It does take some getting used to as you sort of have to keep you feet out in front of you more, but once you have it, they are SOOO comfy. (forget about traditional "good" equitation...if you read up on how the saddles work and how the Aussie cowboys ride, it makes perfect sense).

Justmyluck
May. 19, 2010, 10:24 AM
Haha bucking strap on him it would probably cause him to buck. =) Tee hee

So how much am i looking to spend. I do not want to spend a forture because once he learns to settle we will continue down our english path. I was thinking 500 but like I said I have not a clue.

But I want something solid that isnt cheap and wont hurt him you know?

MSP
May. 19, 2010, 10:30 AM
Size? A Western 15" saddle equates to a 17" English. Take the size of your English and subtract 2".

Brand? Any thing in your price range but stay away from Mexican made or no brand. I have a Dakota and love it. They are well made but not big $. http://www.horsesaddleshop.com/dakotasaddles.html

Go to a tack store and sit in some saddles. I would suggest a roper or trail saddle.

Measure your horses back and measure the saddles to determine if the saddle will be too long for your horse. Google western saddle fitting you will find plenty of helpful info.

I have a large roping saddle and I find it locks me in very well. I find the well wrapped fenders work more to lock me in than the seat does.

Justmyluck
May. 19, 2010, 10:31 AM
I started off western so I may be able to help a bit...
First of all, what seat size is your Stubben? This may help determine what size seat to look for in western. For example, I take a 17" jumping saddle, but my western saddle is 15". You also have to take into consideration the thickness of your thighs since you have to be able to comfortably fit between the pommel and the cantle.

Skirt...this will also depend on your seat size. The smaller the seat size, the more room you will have for a skirt. A picture of your horse may help.

Seat type...suede or synthetic suede.

Brand name: this all depends upon fit and what you are looking for. If you are just looking for a "training"/trail saddle, the synthetics are pretty nice..Wintec, Weaver, Abetta, Big horn, and King Series.
For leather, my current show saddle is a Circle Y. I have also ridden in some nice Bona Allen, Big Horn, TexTan, and Simco saddles.


Stubben is a 17 inch but rides bigger because of the flat seat because I used to hate feeling locked in. I would like a seatbelt now pleaseeeeeeeee =)


Pony:

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/Jubilee.jpg

This one shows his back kind of.

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/closetrot.jpg


So synthetics arent as bad as I've heard?


Thank you guys soooooo much I appreciate it.

Justmyluck
May. 19, 2010, 10:33 AM
I was hopeing to go used, to get a nicer saddle for the money. However most ones either look a bit like junk of have a tremendous amount of silver and tooling.

Bluey
May. 19, 2010, 10:34 AM
You have never ridden in a western saddle and think you can ride in one better than in your Stubben?

I will take my Stubben over any western saddle any day when training horses.;)

It would be hard to think that you could get used to a very different saddle and ride a horse thru some hijinks too at the same time.

How about using that money to get a little bit more training for your horse by a professional?:)

If you insist on that western saddle, there are so many kinds, that are fit for all kinds of rider's behinds and western activities, that finding what would fit you requires trying them on for size.:yes:

I use a 16" Stubben Rex for starting colts, a 14 1/2" modified association ladies ranch saddle for general ranch work and roping and a 16" close contact Bob's reiner for reining horses, that are saddles with a deep middle, but large enough not to bind, although you don't want to tie anything to the horn with them.:eek:
Those reiner saddles come large also because they distribute the rider's weight over more of the back and so help the horses move better for their disciplines.

For what you want, it depends on what may fit your horse and your own behind, hard to say over the internet.:no:

After reading your subsequent posts and seeing the pictures, I wonder if you could try any one western saddle on someone else's horse, that they let you ride it around a little bit, before you go buying one?
You may not like the feel of those saddles at all for training.

twofatponies
May. 19, 2010, 10:35 AM
I got a cheapie but goodie from Stagecoach West:

https://lightning.safe-order.net/stagecoachwest/catalog/index.php?cPath=95_115

The "Bar J" half-synthetic/half-leather trail "lite" series. They come in a variety of sizes (trace your withers and send it in to have them select the right tree size).

It's lightweight, hardy, super secure and comfy, and about $600.

Because the skirt is synthetic (thus soft and flexible), it is an easy fit on short-backed horses. Because parts are synthetic, it doesn't weigh a ton, and is easy to lift onto the horse. But because the seat and other parts are leather it doesn't have that insubstantial feel some all-synthetic saddles have (Wintecs, for example, have always felt "spongy" to me).

I always use a back girth (lunge in it a few times and they'll get used to it - and ALWAYS have the connector strap that links the front and back girths so the back girth doesn't slide backwards and hit the tickly spots!). I always use a breast collar, too. Have yet to "need" it, but it doesn't hurt to get a horse used to having all kinds of stuff on them.

I've used this saddle every day for years, even hunter paced in it (no jumping!), and it doesn't show any signs of wear. For the kind of use you are talking about, it might be a good possibility.

Dramapony_misty
May. 19, 2010, 10:42 AM
OH he's pretty!

I agree that you will probably be looking at a 15" seat.

As far as synthetic vs. leather? There will always be synthetic-haters out there and I think it really depends upon the quality of the synthetic you get. If I were out riding for hours everyday, would I choose a synthetic? Probably not. But for trail riding or the occasional training session...nothing wrong with that. They tend to weight less than a leather saddle so that may be a consideration (and cost less too).

CR Gorge Girl
May. 19, 2010, 10:43 AM
For security I would recommend a barrel saddle. They have higher cantles which equals a deeper seat, and most barrel saddle have suede/ fake suede seats, and often rough out fenders which provides more stick.

Specific to barrel saddles brand: Billy Cook (this is what I have..but there are a lot of "fake" billy cooks out there, make sure the saddle says "Billy Cook. Sulphur, OK", Circle Y is a very good brand as well. Just have to sit in them, and try them on your horse and see what fits and feels the best.

Justmyluck
May. 19, 2010, 10:43 AM
No I've ridden in plenty of western saddles but have never had to purchase one before. That and I've always wanted a more comfortable trail saddle so I can kill two birds with one stone. =)

Its the spin that kills me and I figured with the quick turns barrel racers, cutters ect deal with there must be a reason they arent sitting in slick Stubbens.

Bluey
May. 19, 2010, 10:50 AM
No I've ridden in plenty of western saddles but have never had to purchase one before. That and I've always wanted a more comfortable trail saddle so I can kill two birds with one stone. =)

Its the spin that kills me and I figured with the quick turns barrel racers, cutters ect deal with there must be a reason they arent sitting in slick Stubbens.

Yes, but they also are holding and pushing/pulling on the horn for those quick moves, that are more or less expected.;)

If you are used to western saddles and like them to train, as so many riders do, I would get a good quality older saddle over a new one.
Older saddles are well broken in already and will hold their value.

Go try some for size.:)

PletchersMom
May. 19, 2010, 11:09 AM
Brand? Any thing in your price range but stay away from Mexican made or no brand. I have a Dakota and love it. They are well made but not big $. http://www.horsesaddleshop.com/dakotasaddles.html


Originally I wanted a Billy Cook, however, the waiting list was 10 months for the trail model I liked.

I tried a Dakota saddle and I love it!! They run well under $1000 and well worth the $$. I have had mine for 2 yrs now.

You can also get them customized (ie: seat color, and suede, leather or ostrich)

I added a horn cap on mine to go with the silver accents that came with it.

rabicon
May. 19, 2010, 11:20 AM
A bear trap barrel saddle!!! :yes: It will lock your tail into that saddle!!! I have one I use to barrel race in and I've never felt more secure. When everybody is flying out of saddle because of the horse pushing off so hard my butt was tucked in tight :lol:

This is mine
http://www.statelinetack.com/item/american-saddlery-bear-trap-competitor/SLT731657/

I'd go with a 14 in. in this one Its hard to say without knowing how big you are. I'm 5'7 and 125lbs but my stubben dressage saddle is a 17 and my saddle like this is a 13. My hubby is 5'10 at 160lbs and his is a 14.

Heres me in mine at a fun show, I'm on the bay
http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2405803840103994293xxsMXe
Its not a billy cook or nothing like that but it has been used and abused for 8 years now, this picture was taking it was about 8 years old and it still looked good. I don't ride in it much anymore, its about 10 now but looks great and so does my husbands.

Pat9
May. 19, 2010, 11:29 AM
Hope this kind of helps. Also I may add, if you get a western saddle, make sure it has a bucking strap! They will save you! and your saddle from coming up off the horses back, the bucking strap is the strap that goes behind the cinch around the horses belly, it holds the back half of the saddle to the horse. They are a godsend! Trust me


I just couldn't let this one slide.

It is not a bucking strap, it is a rear girth or cinch. It has nothing to do with keeping the saddle in place for ordinary riding, but stabilizes it when you rope an animal. The rear girth is kept from sliding back by a small strap between it and the front cinch. I see on the net that people are calling the rear girth a flank cinch as well. The rear girth always has a hand's worth of space between it and the horse's abdomen; it is not buckled tightly.

A bucking strap is used to encourage a bucking horse to buck, and it is well back, a true flank cinch. You do not want a bucking strap. Trust me.

Yes, you can rock a double-rigged saddle up on the front of the tree while you are riding it if you leave the rear cinch off and pull up on the back of the saddle. This never happens in real life unless you make it happen, or if you rope something that's dallied or tied to the horn without putting on your rear girth first.

A stock saddle can have center-fire rigging and be pretty stable without having the second girth.

I agree that you should borrow a saddle to try.

franknbeans
May. 19, 2010, 11:32 AM
Had a Circle Y, found that it was too narrow for ANY of my horses-but-got it used, on Ebay, and was able to get every cent out of it in trade (after 4 years of lugging it around) for my new Bar J. I am also an english rider-stubben-who is trying western. I will say that I find that when by guy is being bad I get stabbed by the horn if it is too high-so I went with a reining saddle with a lower horn-still enough to grab :) but not enough to spear me during a buck. Make sure it is wide enough across the withers and thru the shoulders. I also went from a 17 stubben to a 16 Bar J. Would also suggest you look at the weight of them-HUGE difference between throwing up a stubben and a western on a 16.2 horse!

craz4crtrs
May. 19, 2010, 11:44 AM
Stubben is a 17 inch but rides bigger because of the flat seat because I used to hate feeling locked in. I would like a seatbelt now pleaseeeeeeeee =)


Pony:

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/Jubilee.jpg

This one shows his back kind of.

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/closetrot.jpg


So synthetics arent as bad as I've heard?


Thank you guys soooooo much I appreciate it.

I bought an Abetta saddle for my grand nieces and it is a very decent saddle. Hose it off and cleans right up. I got full qh bars since all the horses have wide shoulders at my house and so did their pony. They just got a new guy and the saddle fits him like it was made for him.

Leather...second the Dakotas. I bought my daughter a pleasure model when she was in middle school, she's now 24. Still in new condition. Great leather and fit for both horse and rider.

Good luck.

Justmyluck
May. 19, 2010, 11:56 AM
Had a Circle Y, found that it was too narrow for ANY of my horses-but-got it used, on Ebay, and was able to get every cent out of it in trade (after 4 years of lugging it around) for my new Bar J. I am also an english rider-stubben-who is trying western. I will say that I find that when by guy is being bad I get stabbed by the horn if it is too high-so I went with a reining saddle with a lower horn-still enough to grab :) but not enough to spear me during a buck. Make sure it is wide enough across the withers and thru the shoulders. I also went from a 17 stubben to a 16 Bar J. Would also suggest you look at the weight of them-HUGE difference between throwing up a stubben and a western on a 16.2 horse!


Pony is 14.2 I am concerned with weight not for me lifting but for the horse. =)



Also Im 5'7" and around 125 pounds as long as its not finals week and I'm living off of cheese burgers.

So 15-16' based on seat type. I'm gonna go to the tack store soon and sit in various saddles. But I didnt want to walk in and not know where to start.

saddleup
May. 19, 2010, 12:40 PM
If your horse is a cooperative type, I'd also recommend you take your horse to the tack store parking lot and have them bring out saddles to see if they fit. I have done this with every saddle purchase for the past ten years. Call ahead and make an appointment.

It is a huge time saver.

MSP
May. 19, 2010, 01:18 PM
Originally I wanted a Billy Cook, however, the waiting list was 10 months for the trail model I liked.

I tried a Dakota saddle and I love it!! They run well under $1000 and well worth the $$. I have had mine for 2 yrs now.

You can also get them customized (ie: seat color, and suede, leather or ostrich)

I added a horn cap on mine to go with the silver accents that came with it.

I did a custom Dakota as well! Fabulous to custom order a saddle just the way you want it for $700! Can't beat it.

MSP
May. 19, 2010, 01:31 PM
Pony is 14.2 I am concerned with weight not for me lifting but for the horse. =)



Also Im 5'7" and around 125 pounds as long as its not finals week and I'm living off of cheese burgers.

So 15-16' based on seat type. I'm gonna go to the tack store soon and sit in various saddles. But I didnt want to walk in and not know where to start.

I wouldn't worry about the weight. My roping saddle is on the heavy side at 32 lbs. My mare is barley 14.2 QH and I far out weight you!

The western saddle distributes its weight across a longer area so unless you are looking at parade saddles its more about fitting the horses back and buying a really good pad.

You will build your muscles throwing that saddle on! :D And no one has mentioned but oh the pain of breaking in a new saddle. The first two weeks riding was like torture, made me wish I had bought a used.

Sacred_Petra
May. 19, 2010, 06:48 PM
I have to disagree with everyone on the barrel saddle. Sure they'll suck you in, but take a horn to the gut and you might change your mind. I really like roping saddles. The horn is big enough to prevent too much damage should you find your stomach/chest/bra/pelvic area in an up close and personal situation with it, but they're small enough you can still grab on. Even with the seat being 1.5" too big, I rode a "duck and run" spooky horse all semester long and felt secure the whole time.

Personally, I think a 16" is going to be huge on you. I'm 5'5" and 170lbs and the biggest saddle I ride in is a 15.5" that fits like a 15". If I was going to get a hard seat saddle or any type of ranch saddle I would look for a small 15" or even smaller, but I like my saddle to hold me in a little more.

kypeep
May. 19, 2010, 08:44 PM
I like our cutting saddles for starting horses and trail-riding the greenies. However, (a) I wouldn't want to sit on one for a long trail ride and (b) that horn can be dangerous if you ever get anything caught on it.

One of the worst wrecks I've heard about was someone who was an excellent hand, but got his chaps got on the saddle horn when getting off a youngster (as I recall). Huge blow-up, he lost half an ear in the ensuing accident and apparently was real lucky that's all he lost.

By the way, the horn on the cutting saddle is best used by pushing on it. Pulling on it is likely to send you over the horse's shoulder in any quick manuever. Usually takes awhile for pushing on the horn to become natural for those of us not raised on cutting horses.

headsupheelsdown
May. 19, 2010, 09:22 PM
Go with the barrel saddle. The rounded skirt is what you are looking for, I think.

katarine
May. 19, 2010, 09:57 PM
meh- try a bunch. I hate barrel saddles you are stuck in a position and 99% of the time in a chair seat. No thanks.

If you want new for that $$ Fabtron synthetics are good.

Thank you for clarifying bucking strap vs. rear girth. Saved my fingers

jeano
May. 20, 2010, 07:05 AM
I think I will join Bluey in debunking the "security" of the Western saddle vs the English saddle. My horse used to prop, drop her shoulder, spin and bolt and believe me I came off of my high cantled, sticky suede seated, lock you in swelled saddles every blessed time. And hurt myself with the horn dramatically in the process more than once. Come nearly but not quite off the front of a horned saddle and you will discover new dimensions of pain if you get speared in the thigh or worse.

I am old and decrepit and cannot quickly (or maybe even at all, by this time) DISMOUNT from a Western saddle.

I love Aussies, but I've been spun off them too. Better, perhaps, to train the prop and spin out of the horse with lots of despooking in a confined area.

I am very happy trailriding in featherweight wintec english saddles. If you do go for a synthetic Western, run run run from the Wintecs, they are horrid. Abettas. big horns, fabtrons are much comfier. Yeah you will get in shape slinging a 50 pound roping saddle on your pony, and cleaning all that leather might be balm to your soul, but me, I hate cleaning tack and much prefer something I can wipe or dunk vs something that requires an afternoon to get the grunge off. Not to mention turn a lovely green and get fuzzy overnight in a Southern summer....

mvp
May. 20, 2010, 07:25 AM
I'd do it this way:

Ride a buddy's horse in their western saddle and see who you like it.

Go sit in many at tack stores or friends' barns. Learn what a roping saddle versus barrel saddle versus trail saddle look like.

Learn what kind of tree tends to fit your horse. Mainly look for too wide or too narrow up front. In back, you don't want skirts so long and large that they reach your horse's hip.

At the very end of all that education, I'd buy a used saddle way, way before I'd buy a new one for the same money. Used western saddles hold their value much better than do English saddles. You can get what you want for $500 or so.

Ride and Run
May. 20, 2010, 09:11 AM
I agree with mvp. Try to ride as many saddles as you can so you can get the feel of what is comfortable for you. I mainly trail ride and I own a McCall Lady Wade. Some people would not choose this type of saddle for trail riding, but it is a really comfortable saddle to me and I love it. You may be more comfortable in a trail or barrel saddle. You just have to ride in a few different types until you can decide what is most comfortable/secure to you. You can also figure out seat style and size.

Then you need to figure out what fits your horse. I had a heck of a time fitting my horse. Everyone was telling me the saddles fit, but they were a bit too wide and it was causing her back soreness. I went through a couple of saddles and lost some $$ this way.

Once I finally figured out what I like to sit in and what was comfortable for my horse, I found someone who was willng to work with me until I was sure the saddle fit. I talked to the folks at McCall several times, and when the first Wade saddle I ordered turned out to be too big for my horse and too heavy for me, they exchanged it for a smaller, lighter Lady Wade. They were excellent to work with - their saddles are $$, but my point is to find someone who will work with you.

So, my suggestions are:

1) Find out what type/size of saddle is comfortable to you.
2) Find out what size and shape is comfortable for your horse.
3) Find someone who will work with you until you find a saddle that works for both you and your horse :)

If you are lucky enough to find the perfect saddle that happens to belong to a friend, at least you know exactly what to look for when buying used.

Have Fun!

rabicon
May. 20, 2010, 09:24 AM
The horns can hurt I would think, but I rode years and years in western saddles, from barrel racing, trail riding, crazy horses, jumping (on the trail), and never gutted myself with the horn. You just have to be aware it is there and hold it if need be when something happens.

DandyMatiz
May. 20, 2010, 10:43 AM
if your horse is short backed, you could try an arabian saddle.. they are usually shorter (sometimes rounded skirt, some not). That's what Matiz and my QH mare both use lol. (Matiz is an arabian).

CR Gorge Girl
May. 20, 2010, 11:14 AM
The horns can hurt I would think, but I rode years and years in western saddles, from barrel racing, trail riding, crazy horses, jumping (on the trail), and never gutted myself with the horn. You just have to be aware it is there and hold it if need be when something happens.

Yea... I've never been gutted by the horn either. The worst that happened was when my perpetually-green mare decided she didn't want to walk forward (seriously.. that was all I was asking.. me and that mare don't get along) and she threw a bucking-rearing hissy fit, and the inside of my thigh hit the saddle horn once or twice before I came off.

poltroon
May. 20, 2010, 11:27 AM
You might also consider deerskin breeches, saddle-tight et al, and/or a stickier english saddle. Go to the local consignment shop and see what they have in english. Add one of those leather grab straps across the front.

It's all about comfort. You may be more secure in a western saddle, but you may not.

Leather
May. 20, 2010, 11:45 AM
I've got an Abetta Trinity Endurance saddle that is my "spare" saddle for friends that ride with me. It gives the "security" of a western saddle yet there's no horn to get in the way.

https://buytack.com/products-saddles/act/20554.htm

(I actually find it more secure to grab the pommel than a horn.)

The big thing for me is the western fenders vs. english leathers. I use stirrup turners and find it much easier to recover my stirrups with western fenders than english leathers.

My absolute favorite trail saddle though is my Black Forest Shasta--light, secure and oh so comfortable.

Recent thread on them: http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=252705

Justmyluck
Jun. 1, 2010, 10:04 PM
So I've been riding in my trainers, pulled out once in a blue moon Wintec Western and its already definately helped but it does not fit worth a damn.

So I went to various tack stores and sat in various saddles including a brand new Reinsman that was super comfy. So then we go to this consignment store that just opened and OMG they have everything and everything is in really good condition. So I look and I dont see much and on my last walk through I lift up this syntetic and under it is this saddle. I flip the tag and it says Arabian tree. Which I guess are known for fitting Welsh cobs good. Well I take it over and plop my butt into in prefect. However I am now looking for the price tag which is no where to be found. I ask the lady its 800 dollars 300 over my budget. So we haggle and they have a 5 day trial policy. I take it home fits pony like a glove. So yeah I paid 750 for a 20 year old Circle Y Arabian Equitation saddle. There is not a scratch on it, the fleece is perfect, the suede seat is perfect. Its a beautiful dark oil with no tooling which is what I wanted. I has a padded seat and fits my pony. I rode in it today! Is it bad I paid more for this saddle then my dressage one?

Bluey
Jun. 1, 2010, 10:11 PM
Those older Circle Y arabian saddles were very nice ones, well made, wholly tooled, most dark oil and fit many horses well, not just arabians.
Some lower end ones, the tooling was stamped, not hand carved, but the rest of the saddle was still good quality.
The sheepskin was full, thick and held up well and the seat nicely narrow, unlike so many western saddles, that feel like sitting like a bump on a log, unless you have super long thigs.

Enjoy it.:)

Any pictures?;)

Justmyluck
Jun. 1, 2010, 10:16 PM
No but tomorrow there will be.

Mach Two
Jun. 2, 2010, 12:30 AM
Thank YOU! You beat me to it. and I agree on all counts.
Additionally, cheaper western saddles tend to not have a well done ground seat, and they will torture your seat bones, unless your pelvic opening is very very wide.
I love my McCall Lady Wade for taking on the road with me for trail rides with friends, been on too many saddles that were just too wide for me, and got tired of my hips (with bone spurs now days) hurting after a ride.

Sit in a bunch of saddles, and if you are going to spend much time in a western saddle, look for a smooth unpadded seat...a padded seat tends to grab and rub over hours or riding.


I just couldn't let this one slide.

It is not a bucking strap, it is a rear girth or cinch. It has nothing to do with keeping the saddle in place for ordinary riding, but stabilizes it when you rope an animal. The rear girth is kept from sliding back by a small strap between it and the front cinch. I see on the net that people are calling the rear girth a flank cinch as well. The rear girth always has a hand's worth of space between it and the horse's abdomen; it is not buckled tightly.

A bucking strap is used to encourage a bucking horse to buck, and it is well back, a true flank cinch. You do not want a bucking strap. Trust me.

Yes, you can rock a double-rigged saddle up on the front of the tree while you are riding it if you leave the rear cinch off and pull up on the back of the saddle. This never happens in real life unless you make it happen, or if you rope something that's dallied or tied to the horn without putting on your rear girth first.

A stock saddle can have center-fire rigging and be pretty stable without having the second girth.

I agree that you should borrow a saddle to try.

jeano
Jun. 2, 2010, 08:43 AM
Good deal, those old Circle Y's are nice, nice saddles. And hold their value well. You paid a fair price, I think. One for anything less than 600 bucks would be a steal.

MunchkinsMom
Jun. 2, 2010, 03:22 PM
Good deal, those old Circle Y's are nice, nice saddles. And hold their value well. You paid a fair price, I think. One for anything less than 600 bucks would be a steal.

I agree. I don't think the brand new saddles are as well made as the older models, and that vintage circle Y is a good one.

wendy
Jun. 2, 2010, 06:04 PM
I think I will join Bluey in debunking the "security" of the Western saddle vs the English saddle. My horse used to prop, drop her shoulder, spin and bolt and believe me I came off of my high cantled, sticky suede seated, lock you in swelled saddles every blessed time. And hurt myself with the horn dramatically in the process more than once.
totally agree. The horn is particularly irritating as you try to ride out bucks. But the thing about english saddles vs. western- you can HANG ON with your knees on the english saddle so you can grip and stay on no matter where or how the horse goes. Western saddle, not, nothing holds you on but balance and low walls fore and aft, if horsey goes sideways or twists while bucking, off you come. I would also be a bit concerned about a "lock you in" type saddle on an unpredictable youngster- if you can't shift your position as needed, as you easily can on a flat english saddle, you can easily unbalance the youngster and end up in a dangerous horse-fall where you can't throw yourself free.
If you can't stay on your horse, a saddle change won't save you.

cutemudhorse
Jun. 2, 2010, 08:29 PM
I think you lucked out on that saddle. The fit sounds like it should be made for a cob and old Circle Ys are great! Good deal!

I like my trail Circle Y for my young horses although there are reasons I prefer my Passier dressage. Sometimes I just think I feel more secure in the Western one!!

What I would have added is find a seat style that fits you and is balanced for the job you want it for. And allows you to be balanced and not locked into it.

And I'm glad someone clarified that rear cinch thing. :lol: NOT a bucking strap! Although there is something called a nightlatch that appears to be a leather strap that wraps around the swells for you to grab on to if you anticipate trouble.

gdolapp
Jun. 3, 2010, 02:17 AM
I have the American Sadlery Bear Trap Ranch saddle and love it.
My daughter is now riding in it and I am using my old hereford tex tan.