PDA

View Full Version : sore back behind the saddle.



GPjumper
May. 12, 2010, 05:05 PM
the tittle says it all. My horse is sore behind where the saddle sits. I've been massaging it every day but I'd really like to find the cause. Any advice on where to start?

ryansgirl
May. 12, 2010, 05:16 PM
the tittle says it all. My horse is sore behind where the saddle sits. I've been massaging it every day but I'd really like to find the cause. Any advice on where to start?

A vet appointment is always a good place to start :).

My mare had the same problem in the same area - I took her in for a full lameness exam (no she has never been lame in seven years of owning her)... we tooks xrays of everything and once we saw the ones of her back we could clearly see the problem... Kissing Spines. So yes i'd start w/ a qualified vet :).

dwblover
May. 12, 2010, 05:17 PM
Could be her actual spine or sacroiliac area, but often times it is indicative of hock or stifle soreness.

KristieBee
May. 12, 2010, 06:04 PM
from what i've been reading on my saddle search, if i'm not interpreting incorrectly, an ill fitting saddle can also make a horse very sore in the loins. banana shaped on a flat backed horse, or gusseted/flat on a more concave horse. :/ so there are a lot of potential causes. i agree that a vet, and a saddle fit check are great places to start.

horsepoor
May. 12, 2010, 06:48 PM
Sometimes hock or stifle issues will cause pain in the back from compensating for the hock/stifle pain. I'd be inclined to have a vet take a look and see what they think before pursuing things like saddle fit, etc. My vet is great about saying, nope, nothing I can do, call the chiro (or saddle fitter, or psychic...!), so I like to get that out of the way first.

GPjumper
May. 12, 2010, 07:00 PM
thanks guys! I was thinking stifles/hocks since he's sore on the side he's weakest on. It's been so hard to keep him fit as he only gets turned out once every few days. (He's moving soon because of this problem and my up and coming relocation due to work) I was thinking it also could be ulcers and the tenseness in his back is from "sucking it in" from stomach pain.I already called the vet and he's coming out Friday so I should have an answer then...

JOBEAN
May. 12, 2010, 07:05 PM
Could be her actual spine or sacroiliac area, but often times it is indicative of hock or stifle soreness.


Very true...

alteringwego
May. 12, 2010, 07:54 PM
JUST went through this. Started with being very sore behind the saddle. I had his sacroiliac injected and he improved greatly. He then showed severe soreness in the neck and shoulder area which was eventually determined to be compensatory from the SI pain. Given that SI pain is usually caused by hock or stifle pain I had his hocks injected as well and gave a dose of Estrone for the stifles. None of which flexed positive.
So why was his SI so painful? Could have been an accident years ago, could have locked up from who knows, or it could have been an ill fitting saddle. We'll never know but we do know that he was incredibly sore and had been that way for a long period of time.

huntereq7
May. 12, 2010, 10:10 PM
JUST went through this. Started with being very sore behind the saddle. I had his sacroiliac injected and he improved greatly. He then showed severe soreness in the neck and shoulder area which was eventually determined to be compensatory from the SI pain. Given that SI pain is usually caused by hock or stifle pain I had his hocks injected as well and gave a dose of Estrone for the stifles. None of which flexed positive.
So why was his SI so painful? Could have been an accident years ago, could have locked up from who knows, or it could have been an ill fitting saddle. We'll never know but we do know that he was incredibly sore and had been that way for a long period of time.

Just went through the same exact thing... a ton of problems stemming from one issue. Glad it all worked out for you! My horse had shockwave therapy done on his shoulder, neck, and back and it helped TONS.

Bogie
May. 12, 2010, 10:25 PM
I might start with a massage and see what the therapist finds.

Are you sure that your saddle fits?

Certainly an ill fitting saddle can cause pain.


While soreness in the loins can certainly be indicative of hock/stifle pain, sometimes it can just be soreness from muscle strain, over use, etc.

After a hard workout my boy sometimes is a bit tender and after some stretching and massage he does much better.

TrotTrotPumpkn
May. 12, 2010, 10:28 PM
My gut reaction (assuming the saddle fits) is always hocks based on experiences I've had... but it could be the other things mentioned as well. Let us know what the vet says!

Carol Ames
May. 12, 2010, 10:35 PM
Does she move with her back up? have you been doing more lateral work, shoulder in/ collection lately; how about jumping; is she using her back, basculing;) more than before; has she "cracked her back:cool:" more than usual?

Carol Ames
May. 12, 2010, 10:37 PM
check her buttocks for sore areas

Carol Ames
May. 12, 2010, 10:38 PM
I got my first "soft laser" for just such a problem

Carol Ames
May. 12, 2010, 10:41 PM
ould have been an accident years ago, could have locked up My mare went 8 years before being diagnosed correctly; during that time she won her first event, Sr.. Training and multiple jumper championships, and classes

Carol Ames
May. 13, 2010, 11:01 AM
dr. vasko used to call navicular and stifles "catchall diagnoses:lol:; and there did seem to be an epidemic of both:lol:!the same could be said of kissing vertebrae, and hocks now; after a certain number of years there can be found changes in most horses; vets are making a lot of money:cool:., injecting hocks nowadays when, that is often not :no:the problem; I went with a vet acupuncturist/ chiro/ a holistic vet thru the barn of an Olympic eventer to look at a number of horses whose owners wanted a second opinion:cool: , following a recommendation by an allopathic vet to have the hocks injected; in fact, at one time all candidates for the team ;)were were advised :lol: to have their horses’ hocks injected annually:eek:; it was referred to as “oiling”It was amazing; every horse we looked at had either a rotated pelvis or sacroiliac:yes:; on the drive home she figured the economics$:cool: of the issue; a vet makes far more in time as well as $ with injections:yes:; it was shocking:eek: I hope she will someday write a paper/ do a study on the incidence of this:cool:; I am hearing this more and more in many :sadsmile:disciplines:mad:; “ALL horses need their hocks injected eEVERYyear;”

Carol Ames
May. 13, 2010, 11:04 AM
dr. vasko used to call navicular and stifles "catchall diagnoses:lol:; and there did seem to be an epidemic of both:lol:!the same could be said of kissing vertebrae, and hocks now; after a certain number of years there can be found changes in most horses; vets are making a lot of money:cool:., injecting hocks nowadays when, that is often not :no:the problem; I went with a vet acupuncturist/ chiro/ a holistic vet thru the barn of an Olympic eventer to look at a number of horses whose owners wanted a second opinion:cool: , following a recommendation by an allopathic vet to have the hocks injected; in fact, at one time all candidates for the team ;)were were advised :lol: to have their horses’ hocks injected annually:eek:; it was referred to as “oiling”It was amazing; every horse we looked at had either a rotated pelvis or sacroiliac:yes:; on the drive home she figured the economics$:cool: of the issue; a vet makes far more in time as well as $ with injections:yes:; it was shocking:eek: I hope she will someday write a paper/ do a study on the incidence of this:cool:; I am hearing this more and more in many :sadsmile:disciplines:mad:; “ALL horses need their hocks injected eEVERYyear;”

Carol Ames
May. 13, 2010, 03:07 PM
i agree that a vet, and a saddle fit check are great places to start. __________________IF , they know about :confused:complementary therapies, and treatments:cool: methods

Come Shine
May. 13, 2010, 06:54 PM
A few years ago my pony came up with a sore back, just a bit touchy behind the saddle. Turned out to be the beginnings of rain rot. Good luck with your boy.

NorthFaceFarm
May. 13, 2010, 07:10 PM
Have this with the green beans from time to time. Usually I take it as an indicator that we need to scale back our work that emphasizes building the back muscles and/or add more support for them after such work outs. After a little tweaking of the program the soreness goes away. Definitely look at what kind of work you've been doing and compare your expectations to the horse's fitness level.

GPjumper
May. 14, 2010, 09:44 AM
Well, the vet came out yesterday and it wasn't hocks, stifles or saddle thank god. It was ulcers. six weeks of gastrogaurd!! Apparently my horse was tightening his back muscles (under saddle and on the ground) because rounding up caused the gastic juices to hit the ulcers at the top half of his stomach. He was scoped, so the diagnosis was confirmed. The vet also did acupuncture and massage therapy to help the areas that needed work..Poor guy!

jumpingmaya
May. 14, 2010, 10:32 AM
Well, the vet came out yesterday and it wasn't hocks, stifles or saddle thank god. It was ulcers. six weeks of gastrogaurd!! Apparently my horse was tightening his back muscles (under saddle and on the ground) because rounding up caused the gastic juices to hit the ulcers at the top half of his stomach. He was scoped, so the diagnosis was confirmed. The vet also did acupuncture and massage therapy to help the areas that needed work..Poor guy!

WOW... glad you did the full diagnostic and didn't inject/tweak things that didn't need it!!!
He should be a MUCH happier boy now and the fact that you are moving him and he will get more time out should help with the stress level :)
Best of luck!!! :D

HRF Second Chance
May. 14, 2010, 11:23 AM
While ulcer treatment isn't cheap it's sure cheaper than a new saddle or a lifetime of hock injections.

I recently had the same thing and my horse is on a month of rest, MegaSel and I had a saddle fitter out. I had the lameness check done as well as X-rays and it turns out my 11 YO with a career o/f has nice hocks. :D But now he needs a massage or two before he returns to work. Isn't it amazing how we'll pay for them to get a massage but not ourselves?