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View Full Version : Shoeing ?: Other than aluminum...



JBCool
May. 11, 2010, 01:02 PM
...what can I do to encourage my guy to swing his shoulder & front foot? He trots ok, just kind of "under himself." Well, I guess a pic will help more than explaining, huh?

http://csyoung.smugmug.com/Horse-Shows/Bridgewater-College-Horse-Sho/Saturday-Pleasure-Hunter-Walk/11656836_N3vvK#822019995_evJK3

This was his first horse show a few months ago and he has since learned to push from behind more. I know he'll never be the best mover, but I just want him to move his best.

TIA!

P.S. I'm trying to avoid aluminum in front b/c my mom and I like to trail ride in the mountains too and they'd get eaten up.

nlk
May. 11, 2010, 04:13 PM
Honestly (and I could be wrong) I don't think your horse is built to move any more through his shoulder. It looks like he has a very upright shoulder, although with out standing shots it's hard to tell.

You could try caveletti (sp?) to stretch out his stride. Start at 4-4.5 ft. trot,trot, trot and trot some more. Then increase them by a foot, lather rinse repeat. He should eventually increase his stride to 6' with out a problem. Make sure your posting is slow and rhythmic not fast and choppy.

Finally I have recently had my old farrier do my new horse, as the current barn farrier couldn't keep a shoe on him to save his life. He kept trying to shorten the hind end reach :eek: and had my horse going like pistons in the hind.


My new/old farrier changed a few angles. Apparently some farriers get stuck in the every horse should have a 50' angle etc etc. my horse moves 10x better with a 55' angle and a little rasp to the back toe to square it off ever so slightly.

He moves better through is shoulder then ever.

Lynnwood
May. 11, 2010, 04:22 PM
could try Titanium if your looking for a lighter shoe that has a bit more strength than alum. They can be a bit more $$ since they are less often used. But I used them on one of my hunters that had a pawing habbit and was eathing threw alums. They held up well and were pretty light.

shawneeAcres
May. 11, 2010, 07:28 PM
If you spend some time in your training working on leg yielding, shoulder in and other lateral type of work, the horses shoulders will get freer and he will use his hind end better, making him move nicer. He may never be a "10" mover, but you can improve his movement at least a bit. He looks like he is going around on his forehand and hind end is trailing behind him. Spend some training time rather than looking for a "fix" thru shoeing etc.

rabicon
May. 11, 2010, 07:35 PM
Doesn't look like he can to me.

LetsGoSteady
May. 11, 2010, 08:21 PM
Doesn't look like he can to me.

Agreed with the above. He looks like he maxxed out with his range of motion. Quarter cross? His hip angle looks like it.

Sebastian
May. 11, 2010, 08:40 PM
If you spend some time in your training working on leg yielding, shoulder in and other lateral type of work, the horses shoulders will get freer and he will use his hind end better, making him move nicer. He may never be a "10" mover, but you can improve his movement at least a bit. He looks like he is going around on his forehand and hind end is trailing behind him. Spend some training time rather than looking for a "fix" thru shoeing etc.

Ditto this. IMHE the weight of his shoes makes no difference. The best way to improve movement on the front end is to rev up the "engine" on the hind end. The more he carries himself behind, the free-er he will look in the shoulder. Even if you don't really increase the size of his step due to conformation, the free shoulder WILL make his movement more fluid and "prettier."

Good luck,
Seb :)

JBCool
May. 12, 2010, 10:44 AM
Thanks guys. That pic is a few months old (I've only had him since Jan) and he's learned to go a lot better since that was taken, both front and back. It was just the only one I had. Watching him actually move, my trainer thinks aluminums in front will help, I was just wondering if there was anything else to try b/c they won't last trail riding.

rabicon
May. 12, 2010, 10:56 AM
The shoeing isn't going to make that much of a difference. Like others said you can work on moving him from behind, but you said you did that and he is pushing better. Its just not in this boy to naturally extend. He just doesn't have the angle in his shoulder to do it, and where his legs sit and neck ties in. Looks like he is about tapped out on how far he is going to extend that front leg.

tarheelmd07
May. 12, 2010, 12:53 PM
Watching him actually move, my trainer thinks aluminums in front will help, I was just wondering if there was anything else to try b/c they won't last trail riding.

How much trail riding are you doing? My older guy was in aluminum up front (steel behind) for the last 3 years - he did jumpers (and the occasional hunter class) in the off season and evented once or twice a month March-Nov - and did lots of trail riding/hacking/out of ring work for conditioning (along with 24/7 turnout except to come in to eat), and we never had a problem with the aluminum shoes. Granted, we couldn't reset the fronts (he needed a new pair every time) but they held up fine.

JBCool
May. 12, 2010, 01:31 PM
Tarheel: when my mom goes trail riding, we go to the mountains. National Park fire roads, etc. Our usual trail is fairly long with a lot of rock; not a good place for a shoe to give up the ghost. I just don't want to take the risk that aluminum can get me in but not out.