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Void
May. 7, 2010, 01:47 AM
I just bought a new beval bridle, and my trainer told me to strip it before the initial oiling, but my gut feeling is that I shouldn't.

Is my gut telling me the truth or should I follow my trainer's advice?

kingpin
May. 7, 2010, 02:09 AM
Depends on what trainer means by 'strip'. If they mean 'strip' by using a regular cleaner (glycerine soap, effax ledercombi, even some palmolive...whatever your choice is) to get off the waxy protective layer most new leather comes with- then yes. That way the oil can actually absorb. If they mean using something more serious, like ammonia (which is reserved for stripping seriously nasty stuff)- then it's a fairly horrible idea for new tack IMO.

ExJumper
May. 7, 2010, 02:10 AM
Depends. If it's coated in a sexy soft waxy layer, just warm it up and massage it in with you hands. Some cheaper leather is coated in something almost like a sealant and unless you strip that off, the oil will just bead up on the leather.

Which beval bridle did you get? Does it seem to be coated in anything?

katie16
May. 7, 2010, 09:43 AM
Not sure which bridle you have, but I have the Beval Heritage bridle. I simply massaged the waxy coating in with my fingertips and then applied one light coat of oil. That was all that was needed.

BAC
May. 7, 2010, 11:44 AM
Depends. If it's coated in a sexy soft waxy layer, just warm it up and massage it in with you hands. Some cheaper leather is coated in something almost like a sealant and unless you strip that off, the oil will just bead up on the leather.

Which beval bridle did you get? Does it seem to be coated in anything?

I agree with this, if you bought a Beval Heritage bridle just work it in with your hands and oil. If its one of their less expensive bridles and seems to be coated with something heavy, then clean it will castile soap first.

Justice
May. 7, 2010, 03:10 PM
I have never had a Beval bridle that needed to even be cleaned at all before oiling, and it's my bridle brand of choice, so I've had a few. I haven't had anything lower than the ltd 2.

I like to break it all the way down, dip each part in high quality oil, rub with rag, dip again and put the whole thing in a ziploc bag and leave it in the hot sun all day. Presto, perfect bridle. I should be a Beval Spokesperson, I love them so.

vxf111
May. 7, 2010, 04:11 PM
I have a Ltd 2 and a Heritage. I gotta' tell you, I am not thrilled with the Ltd 2 and I am surprised. The edges of the leather are dyed with some reddish material. The leather itself took oil fine (no need to strip) but the edges remain the dyed color. I don't like it. I didn't expect that from English leather and I am a bit bummer. By Heritage is a thing of beauty... I thought the Ltd 2 would make sense as an everyday bridle... but I just don't dig it. Beval has been A+++ to deal with though, it has to be said. I just don't dig the construction of this bridle.

To answer the question... no need to strip, just clean with soap and massage off any waxy coating.

Justice
May. 7, 2010, 09:58 PM
vxf111,

I think there is something wrong with your ltd2. I have never had one like that, and the one I just got on clearance is not like that either. If I were you, I'd ask them to take it back. I actually bought mine as a schooling bridle, and looked at it and thought I liked it as much as my New Canaan.

lauriep
May. 7, 2010, 10:44 PM
Depends on what trainer means by 'strip'. If they mean 'strip' by using a regular cleaner (glycerine soap, effax ledercombi, even some palmolive...whatever your choice is) to get off the waxy protective layer most new leather comes with- then yes. That way the oil can actually absorb. If they mean using something more serious, like ammonia (which is reserved for stripping seriously nasty stuff)- then it's a fairly horrible idea for new tack IMO.

Not true. I've been using ammonia to strip the wax off of new tack for 30+ years and all my bridles have oiled up beautifully.

mvp
May. 7, 2010, 11:25 PM
Not true. I've been using ammonia to strip the wax off of new tack for 30+ years and all my bridles have oiled up beautifully.

But I haven't seen a coat of this light wax so thick it needed ammonia. It was added to fine leather (usually British) to preserve it during shipping. A towel takes it off.

I'm not sure, but I think the Ltd2 Bridles might be made from Italian leather. Do they seem to have a fine grain but slightly opaque finish? (For you tack archeologists, these look different from spankin' new New Canaans.) Anywho, the opaque finish and red die coming off the edges could be why the OPs trainer says strip.... and you mean chemically strip, right? Not just water?

I don't think you should have to. But then I'm not a fan of this kind of leather.

lauriep
May. 8, 2010, 08:59 AM
You rub it in, I take it off. End result is the same. I have mainly worked on English made bridles, and have found various amounts of the wax, or tallow, on the leather. I remove it. It is not a necessary component of a beautifully oiled bridle.

My point was to kingpin that it is NOT a horrible thing to do to a bridle, as long as you oil or condition immediately. I currently have 20 bridles hanging in the tackroom, nearly all originally oiled by me, and using this method, and all are lovely. All.

Void
May. 9, 2010, 01:59 AM
Thanks for all the replies. It's an LTD2.

My trainer wants me to strip it with Nail Polish Remover. I ask if I should or shouldn't because it doesn't feel nearly as waxy as my previous bridle (it actually feels completely naked in comparision).

The edges don't seem to be dyed or red that I've noticed (and believe me my previous bridle was very red and dyed and icky)

I think I'll go the saddle soap method first.

Lucassb
May. 9, 2010, 10:12 AM
Nail polish remover? Seriously?

Um, Just.Say.No. (If you need back up, I am quite sure that you can call Beval and inquire what they recommend, and get a similarly horrified reaction to the nail polish remover suggestion.)

If you don't want to take the time to just gently work the bridle a bit with your hands to get rid of the coating, then do as mvp suggests and towel it off. Or use Castile soap, which is an excellent product to gently clean leather without stripping it. Then oil <lightly> with the product of your choice. I use olive oil, myself, and have had wonderful results for the last several decades, but regular neatsfoot works perfectly well also.

I personally do not ever use ammonia on my tack at all, with the exception of perhaps using a glug or two in a bucket of warm water if I come across tack that is truly filthy... in which case it wouldn't be my tack since I am ridiculously diligent about its care.

gumshoe
May. 9, 2010, 11:24 AM
Beval's leather care advice:

•Good quality British bridles initially need only a light oiling on the flesh side.
Never soak strapgoods in oil for any length of time.

I got a Heritage bridle about a year ago. It has only ever seen Carr&Day&Martin saddle soap and Passier conditioner on the flesh side. It is gorgeous. :)

mvp
May. 9, 2010, 11:29 AM
Nail polish remover? That's some big chemical guns. If you do it will you post the results, for the sake of science and all of humanity? I'd try it on a small, sacrificial piece of tack first.

kookicat
May. 9, 2010, 11:31 AM
Thanks for all the replies. It's an LTD2.

My trainer wants me to strip it with Nail Polish Remover. I ask if I should or shouldn't because it doesn't feel nearly as waxy as my previous bridle (it actually feels completely naked in comparision).

The edges don't seem to be dyed or red that I've noticed (and believe me my previous bridle was very red and dyed and icky)

I think I'll go the saddle soap method first.

:eek: I'd never use something like that on my tack. Scary suggestion, IMO.

Void
May. 9, 2010, 12:59 PM
Okay good, I'm glad I'm not the only one who had a visceral reaction to that. I'd gladly use it on my old bridle because its awful anyways.

This is my first bridle that has come to me as a "baby" so I want to raise it right :). Thanks for the advice!

tasia
May. 9, 2010, 05:05 PM
I also just bought and ltd2 on clearance. I just brought it to tack shop and had it dipped. Looks great :)

KristieBee
May. 9, 2010, 05:14 PM
i've taken care of all my tack in the way i was taught, and i have bridles and saddles that have lasted and stayed beautiful since i was a teenager. which makes them 20 years old.


when it's new, and periodically for a deep clean and oil replenishment:

1. rub firmly with sponge, water and castile soap, wipe with a clean damp cloth to remove protective wax/tallow on a new piece of equipment (or on used strapgoods, to remove the general sweat/glycerine/dust residue). let dry.

2. apply a light coat of pure neatsfoot oil. if you want it to darken heat a bit of olive oil (not too hot) and use that. let dry for an hour or so, and apply a light second coat. let it dry for an hour or so.

3. buff with a damp/almost dry sponge saturated with glycerine soap to seal in the moisture and put on a nice shine.


for maintenance between deep cleans, wiping down with glycerine saddle soap is both cleansing and moisturizing enough. but periodically, in my experience, leather really needs the thorough cleansing that castile provides. there's a lot of fat in glycerine soap (hence why it's both cleansing and moisturizing) and so although it cleanses your leather, it does produce a residue over time.

huntereq7
May. 9, 2010, 06:05 PM
No way to nail polish remover!! Follow Beval's leather care advice.

mvp
May. 9, 2010, 08:20 PM
[QUOTE=KristieBee;4854681}

when it's new, and periodically for a deep clean and oil replenishment:

1. rub firmly with sponge, water and castile soap, wipe with a clean damp cloth to remove protective wax/tallow on a new piece of equipment (or on used strapgoods, to remove the general sweat/glycerine/dust residue). let dry.

2. apply a light coat of pure neatsfoot oil. if you want it to darken heat a bit of olive oil (not too hot) and use that. let dry for an hour or so, and apply a light second coat. let it dry for an hour or so.

3. buff with a damp/almost dry sponge saturated with glycerine soap to seal in the moisture and put on a nice shine.
[/QUOTE]

These three separate steps are the ones I use too.

redlight
May. 10, 2010, 10:52 AM
Beval's has detailed instructions on how to care for your tack on their website. I wouldn't do anything different then what they recommend. I cringe when I read what some people do to their new tack. If in doubt always go to the manufacturer or tack store where you purchased to get the best advice.

superpony123
May. 11, 2010, 12:12 AM
if you mean strip by ammonia, NO!!! if you mean strip by a good scrubbing with castile followed by glycerine conditioner, YES.

ive had 2 beval bridles and have NEVER used ammonia on them, theyre both beautiful and soft.

pacificprima
May. 11, 2010, 02:25 PM
ok so on a related note...I just bought a new Devoucoux bridle (for over 65 % off!!) :D in the horrible natural baby poop yellow :eek: I was told it was raw leather and would oil up to look like my Butet. Now, I have used the heated oil but there is something on the edges and some of the leather does not seem to be darkening like the rest. It almost looks like it has some paint/sealant on it?? Is this one of those times I would use the ammonia? Or am I destined to have a strange coloured $800 bridle :confused:

pacificprima
May. 14, 2010, 10:03 PM
can anyone help me with my dilema?? :confused:

n2dressage
May. 15, 2010, 07:22 AM
The recommendation I heard from a saddler once was ivory soap to clean new tack then coat in hydrophane (darkening version in your case). It sounds to me a safer first experiment for you than ammonia... I've actually never heard the ammonia thing and it scares me a lil bit. Maybe some diluted vinegar for moldy tack but ammonia seems quite.... Ummm abusive? Black Country told me for their tack to wipe dirt with a damp cloth only and if it begins looking dry to use something creamy you'd put on your own skin. And the OPs question about nail polish remover... Anyone ever notice how weird your skin and nails look after taking off nail polish???

vxf111
May. 15, 2010, 10:28 PM
ok so on a related note...I just bought a new Devoucoux bridle (for over 65 % off!!) :D in the horrible natural baby poop yellow :eek: I was told it was raw leather and would oil up to look like my Butet. Now, I have used the heated oil but there is something on the edges and some of the leather does not seem to be darkening like the rest. It almost looks like it has some paint/sealant on it?? Is this one of those times I would use the ammonia? Or am I destined to have a strange coloured $800 bridle :confused:

Same issue I am having with my Beval LTD. I don't think ammonia is going to touch that edge coating. I think, short of scraping it off somehow, it's stuck on there. *sigh* this is why I only buy English bridlework! I was NOT expecting this from Beval!!! Here's a photo of the bridle from today...

http://s5.photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/Woodedge%20May%2018%202010/?action=view&current=Woodedge3.jpg

You can kind of see that the bridle leather is brown but the edges are reddish.

Oddly,I have 2 pairs of the LTR reins. On one pair the rein edges don't have the coating. Only the bridle pieces. On the other pair, the edges do. Weird.

vxf111
May. 15, 2010, 10:29 PM
P.S.- I regularly clean tack with diluted ammonia, with no problem. I don't think it's necessary to "strip" new tack with it, but when properly followed by oil/lederbalsam, it has never harmed any of my bridles either.

ynl063w
May. 15, 2010, 10:43 PM
I have a Beval LTD 2 that I got on clearance a year or so ago, and mine is the same as vxf111 describes. The edges are RED and I hate it so much I don't even like to school in it. It oiled up to a kind of weird color too (kind of reddish chocolate; I've never seen this color in a bridle before), and it looks similar to the picture vxf111 posted. It looks awful on my horse, who is a dark bay. I just don't like the bridle at all. I'm grateful I didn't pay anywhere near full price for it, and that I didn't pony up the cash for the matching martingale.

vxf111
May. 15, 2010, 10:49 PM
I have a Beval LTD 2 that I got on clearance a year or so ago, and mine is the same as vxf111 describes. The edges are RED and I hate it so much I don't even like to school in it. It oiled up to a kind of weird color too (kind of reddish chocolate; I've never seen this color in a bridle before), and it looks similar to the picture vxf111 posted. It looks awful on my horse, who is a dark bay. I just don't like the bridle at all. I'm grateful I didn't pay anywhere near full price for it, and that I didn't pony up the cash for the matching martingale.

I am pretty unhappy with mine too. I bought it as a "patch" bridle while I broke in Frankie's everyday Edgewood and figured out what I wanted to do for a show bridle for him (I am still waffling about whether I want regular width raised fancy padded OR whether I want the unpadded extra wide fancy [like Somerset's Beval Heritage, below]). Yeah, I continue to waffle AND be annoyed by that bridle :(

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/Woodedge%20May%2018%202010/Woodedge12.jpg
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/Woodedge%20May%2018%202010/Woodedge6.jpg
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/Woodedge%20May%2018%202010/Woodedge5.jpg

ynl063w
May. 15, 2010, 11:01 PM
I am pretty unhappy with mine too. I bought it as a "patch" bridle while I broke in Frankie's everyday Edgewood and figured out what I wanted to do for a show bridle for him (I am still waffling about whether I want regular width raised fancy padded OR whether I want the unpadded extra wide fancy [like Somerset's Beval Heritage, below]). Yeah, I continue to waffle AND be annoyed by that bridle :(

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/Woodedge%20May%2018%202010/Woodedge12.jpg
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/Woodedge%20May%2018%202010/Woodedge6.jpg
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/Woodedge%20May%2018%202010/Woodedge5.jpg


That one's pretty! I've been eyeballing a wide noseband edgewood at a local tack shop for ages, but i just don't need another bridle. I'll probably cave in one of these days unless someone tells me it's not worth it (hint hint).

BridalBridle
May. 15, 2010, 11:25 PM
WOW this turned into a long one for a simple question. I'd say call Beval. Or what I've done for 40 yrs is treat leather for what it is. SKIN> If I got wax on my skin I would wash with warm water and glycerin (or Ivory)soap to get the wax off. Then start the process of getting the bridle darker. Go to the horse show and have a good time. Have fun.:yes::yes::yes:

superpony123
May. 15, 2010, 11:25 PM
i'm kind of shocked that people are having this problem with the ltd. the reason i stick to beval is because i've never seen a bad beval bridle, except ones that were never cared for and extremely old. i've got an LTD 2 and a newport, or maybe it's a heritage. i think it's a newport though.

i've never had problems with either one. i bought the LTD2 in havanna so i never needed to do any darkening. the newport i bought in ugly raw orange color and oiled it up to a nice darker chocolate color

http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v332/132/89/589955224/n589955224_1717074_2491.jpg
http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v315/132/89/589955224/n589955224_1717266_6793.jpg

and with my LTD2 ive never noticed any difference in color in the edge/seal and the face side of the leather.

Jersey Fresh
May. 16, 2010, 08:24 AM
i'm kind of shocked that people are having this problem with the ltd. the reason i stick to beval is because i've never seen a bad beval bridle, except ones that were never cared for and extremely old. i've got an LTD 2 and a newport, or maybe it's a heritage. i think it's a newport though.

i've never had problems with either one. i bought the LTD2 in havanna so i never needed to do any darkening. the newport i bought in ugly raw orange color and oiled it up to a nice darker chocolate color

http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v332/132/89/589955224/n589955224_1717074_2491.jpg
http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v315/132/89/589955224/n589955224_1717266_6793.jpg

and with my LTD2 ive never noticed any difference in color in the edge/seal and the face side of the leather.


I've had problems with Beval bridles-glue leaking after THEY oiled it, cracking leather etc.

BTW neither the newport or heritage start out orange. The newport is a dark havanna unoiled and the hertige is a nut brown color and I don't belive it square raised. You most likely have a stamford or a unpadded LTD if its square raised and was orange.

Lucassb
May. 16, 2010, 10:04 AM
IMO, Beval's strapgoods are nowhere near the quality they used to be. The last Beval bridle I purchased was one of the original New Canaan's, and it's lovely. But it's probably 10-15 years old now. I am a big Beval fan in general, but although I always go in hoping things have improved, these days I buy other brands. For the money, you can get much nicer bridles elsewhere.

redlight
May. 16, 2010, 11:18 AM
If you just got the bridle and haven't used it see what Beval's return policy is and return it if you aren't happy. No sense in trying to make the bridle into something it's not meant to be and wind up unhappy with the purchase.

FWIW, this is why I love dark havana bridles. They may not be the "flavor of the moment" but you never have to worry what color they are going to darken into.

mvp
May. 16, 2010, 11:53 AM
I bought a prototype Ovation with those dastardly red edges long ago and couldn't change those POSs by usual means-- including ammonia.

The whole bridle started out orange but was "naked leather" enough to darken to a respectable color on the flat parts. The red edges did not and I got rid of the whole disaster.

I believe the red stuff has petroleum products in it and cannot be stripped. If you can return it to Bevals and give them a stern talking to about the quality of their bridle work slipping below even the sub-basement of levels, then do that. If not, I think you have nothing to lose.

I'd try the acetone technique, or sand those SOBs if I were really riled up. Or I'd do minimal care and use that POS bridle on the horses that might break it.

Seriously. I know Bevals is trying to grab a different market share, but this and their yellow argentine saddle is going a bit too far.

akhunterrider
May. 16, 2010, 12:05 PM
I have a New Caanan bridle that I purchased 7 years ago. It is a beautiful bridle. However, my friend purchased one a year or so after I did and it didn't even have a faint resemblance to mine. Which makes me wonder if mine was older stock?

A lot of companies are not upholding their quality and unfortunately a lot of things aren't as nice as they used to be.

Here are a few pictures of my New Caanan:
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=39695893&l=360bfb0a40&id=17025980

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=39695893&l=360bfb0a40&id=17025980

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=39695893&l=360bfb0a40&id=17025980

pacificprima
May. 16, 2010, 01:57 PM
I bought a prototype Ovation with those dastardly red edges long ago and couldn't change those POSs by usual means-- including ammonia.

The whole bridle started out orange but was "naked leather" enough to darken to a respectable color on the flat parts. The red edges did not and I got rid of the whole disaster.

I believe the red stuff has petroleum products in it and cannot be stripped. If you can return it to Bevals and give them a stern talking to about the quality of their bridle work slipping below even the sub-basement of levels, then do that. If not, I think you have nothing to lose.

I'd try the acetone technique, or sand those SOBs if I were really riled up. Or I'd do minimal care and use that POS bridle on the horses that might break it.

Seriously. I know Bevals is trying to grab a different market share, but this and their yellow argentine saddle is going a bit too far.


I went back to the tack shop and was told that I could sand it with fine sandpaper or an emery board??? :confused: for come reason that was more scary sounding than the ammonia! Someone else try if first and let me know lol

I should have just stuck with my black jumper tack - no surprises there...

superpony123
May. 16, 2010, 01:58 PM
I've had problems with Beval bridles-glue leaking after THEY oiled it, cracking leather etc.

BTW neither the newport or heritage start out orange. The newport is a dark havanna unoiled and the hertige is a nut brown color and I don't belive it square raised. You most likely have a stamford or a unpadded LTD if its square raised and was orange.

i purchased a different noseband for it. it might not have been orange orange, but i remember it being very light and red/orange. i'm guessing it was a heritage or newport because the price tag was something like $300+ (but i got it on sale)

Jersey Fresh
May. 16, 2010, 02:02 PM
i purchased a different noseband for it. it might not have been orange orange, but i remember it being very light and red/orange. i'm guessing it was a heritage or newport because the price tag was something like $300+ (but i got it on sale)

sounds like the original LTD which was in the $300 range. Heritage and Newport were both $400+ and start out extremely dark.

Orchid
May. 16, 2010, 05:03 PM
I got so fed up with the color of my Passier Precision saddle years ago that I used non-acetone nail polish remover ALL OVER the flaps...it was the newmarket type color--teak I think they called it--but it was sealed leather and looked painted...wouldn't darken and looked worse with use as the sealant would rub off in places and the leather under it would darken up nicely...
anyway, I was thrilled with the results--I cleaned it right after to get as much of the chemicals back off the saddle, then gave it a good oiling...darkened up something lovely. Sometime you gotta do what you gotta do! :)

Rudy
May. 16, 2010, 05:16 PM
As for acetone, if you buy a good leather deglazer such as the one made by Angelus, it contains acetone. I use it on bridles to strip the coating so I have a nice nonwaxy surface to begin painting. It takes wax off the top layer and may darken the leather in places but otherwise doesn't make the leather icky. It also dries fast and if you use it once I don't see the problem.

It also removes the rubbery coating from bridle edges with ease. ;)

Acetone isn't that scary....

JrHunterRider
May. 16, 2010, 08:49 PM
Beval will also oil the bridle for you.

Justice
May. 17, 2010, 12:58 PM
vxf111,

You got a completely different ltd2 than I did. I ordered the cob fancy stitched unpadded, and it is at least as nice as the New Canaan I used to have, although it doesn't have a roller noseband. I bought it for a schooling bridle, thinking I'd get a Jimmy's to show in, but honestly, it's so pretty and my filly has such a petite head, I might show in it. The only think I don't love about the Beval bridles (both Ltd and New Canaan) is that they sport the cognac fancy stitching instead of pure white. It looks dirty to me on a horse with lots of white on its face.

I am so sorry that happened to you, because I am a huge Beval fan and I posted the link about the bridles being on clearance, so I feel like it's partly my fault that you ended up with it if you saw the link here. I am trying to work today (obviously not successfully since I am on COTH) and mine is still broken apart from the first oiling, but I will post pics.

vxf111
May. 17, 2010, 02:34 PM
Justice, please don't feel BAD! OMG, Please, honestly, don't feel bad for sharing a bargain! Please!

I bought the oversized raised padded.

I tried nailpolish remover last night on the dreaded edges of the LTD bridle. Didn't have ANY effect. Didn't remove the sealant. I didn't DUNK the bridle in acetone or really scrub-- but I did rub the edges. Did nada. :(

Justice
May. 17, 2010, 09:32 PM
Get ready to laugh your butts off. I took a picture of the browband of the bridle that up until now I have been perfectly happy with, and looked at it on my computer. Okay, the edge looks shinier blown up on my screen in HD. But, it's the same color. I think.

Here it is. I think the reason vxf111's looked so different to me is that it looks redder, wider and bigger. But, that's likely because I always assumed her horse had a smaller head because it's so pretty, and it makes sense that the oversize padded would have wider cheek pieces. But, the edges of the bridle look like a different color to me, and even in the picture, mine don't. They won't take it back or replace it with something nicer at the same cost? It's Beval, for goodness sake. All the Best. I'm a believer.

Void
May. 17, 2010, 10:48 PM
Get ready to laugh your butts off. I took a picture of the browband of the bridle that up until now I have been perfectly happy with, and looked at it on my computer. Okay, the edge looks shinier blown up on my screen in HD. But, it's the same color. I think.

Here it is. I think the reason vxf111's looked so different to me is that it looks redder, wider and bigger. But, that's likely because I always assumed her horse had a smaller head because it's so pretty, and it makes sense that the oversize padded would have wider cheek pieces. But, the edges of the bridle look like a different color to me, and even in the picture, mine don't. They won't take it back or replace it with something nicer at the same cost? It's Beval, for goodness sake. All the Best. I'm a believer.


Funnily enough I stripped (castille soap) and oiled my new bridle and have since promptly lost my browband... big bummer

vxf111
May. 18, 2010, 09:38 AM
Get ready to laugh your butts off. I took a picture of the browband of the bridle that up until now I have been perfectly happy with, and looked at it on my computer. Okay, the edge looks shinier blown up on my screen in HD. But, it's the same color. I think.

Here it is. I think the reason vxf111's looked so different to me is that it looks redder, wider and bigger. But, that's likely because I always assumed her horse had a smaller head because it's so pretty, and it makes sense that the oversize padded would have wider cheek pieces. But, the edges of the bridle look like a different color to me, and even in the picture, mine don't. They won't take it back or replace it with something nicer at the same cost? It's Beval, for goodness sake. All the Best. I'm a believer.

Appreciate the compliment, but that's a big honkin' huge head pictured :) LOL I don't really stock "delicate, pretty heads" these days. All my horses have big old oversized heads.

I think your bridle is also sealed on the edges, but yours seems to be sealed in a darker brown color. Mine is sealed in red. I do think they both have some kind of sealant, at least from looking at the photos online.

I think I will be investing in an emery board this weekend....

ynl063w-- I stopped waffling, got off the pot-- and got Frankie a 1 inch noseband extra-wide fancy padded Edgewood for his show bridle. Nothing like being annoyed with a schooling bridle to make you suck it up and buy a nice show bridle ;) So if you were looking for someone to be GOOD influence and say DON'T buy it-- well, I guess that's not me ;)