PDA

View Full Version : Stoping my horse from bowing....



nlk
May. 2, 2010, 03:13 PM
So here's the deal. My 7 yr old has settled great this year. Had most of the winter easy and is now back to work. EXCEPT one problem I run into with him. He bows big time when he gets silly jumping. Now typically this is not a problem for me. I have fixed this problem on numerous riders and horses. HOWEVER my own horse usually gets put on the sidelines so little problems don't get fixed! I think this is a problem from his earliest training as he has done it since day one with me.

SO here's what I DO do. I use my out side aids. I try to "block" with my outside leg and hold my inside rein to prevent his shoulder from moving out. This method has NEVER failed me! but with my horse it's like my aids don't exist! I have tried to open my inside rein, I have tried to hold my inside rein....I try "square" dressage like turns....

Now under every other circumstance he responds and listens great to my aids. The only time it's a problem is when we are jumping and he gets excited!

None of this results in a refusal ever. My horse will jump anything no matter how you put him in. SO I wouldn't consider it a run out or bulking......

So how do I fix this when going back to basics isn't a solution as he does great with all the basics?

CHT
May. 2, 2010, 03:27 PM
Do you mean he bulges his shoulders? Does he do it both ways?

nlk
May. 2, 2010, 03:32 PM
Do you mean he bulges his shoulders? Does he do it both ways?

Not just his shoulder and yes he does it both ways.

We go to turn the corner for a jump and instead of turning he turns his body but it still side ways like we never turned! So I guess not a true bow. He just blows by my aids.....

And I should reiterate that it is not ALL the time. just when he's feeling silly......or having a young boy moment....:D

jetsmom
May. 2, 2010, 03:35 PM
Practice turns on the haunches, walking square corners.

Practice counterbending, then bending, then counterbending at the walk, then trotting circles, then cantering circles.

Practice counter canter.

Trot jumps, land in a straight line and practice coming to a smooth halt straight.

Then add in a crossrail on a long diagonal, and counter bend on landing, then trot the corner, bending correctly, but making a circle, going to a counter bend if he needs a reminder. If you've gotten him to do all of the flat exercises, with bending/counterbending, then he should be easy to correct. If he is ignoring you, as opposed to not understanding, add a small spur.

nlk
May. 2, 2010, 03:41 PM
Practice turns on the haunches, walking square corners.

Practice counterbending, then bending, then counterbending at the walk, then trotting circles, then cantering circles.

Practice counter canter.

Trot jumps, land in a straight line and practice coming to a smooth halt straight.

Then add in a crossrail on a long diagonal, and counter bend on landing, then trot the corner, bending correctly, but making a circle, going to a counter bend if he needs a reminder. If you've gotten him to do all of the flat exercises, with bending/counterbending, then he should be easy to correct. If he is ignoring you, as opposed to not understanding, add a small spur.


Thanks, we could work on the counter bending.

He totally understands me and is just flat out ignoring....I have a spur too:lol:

CHT
May. 2, 2010, 03:54 PM
So he is rubber necking? Nose is turned but not his body?

Sounds to me like he is getting quick and onto his forehand, so when you ask him to turn, he isn't balanced enough to comply. More spur/stronger aids won't help him rebalance.

My thought is that you need to work on rebalancing him after the previous jump, and then think of turning his bum first with that outside leg and hand and slight guiding/openning inside rein...making sure that the inside rein aid has some wobble so he can't lean out against it.

As soon as you feel him lose the turn, bring him back to a halt or trot to get him back on his hiney, and then try again.

You could also consider putting a small bounce or skinny fence on the ends of the short side of the arena, to encourage you (and your horse) to balance up and ride the ends of the ring more thoughtfully, and give your horse something to think about.

nlk
May. 2, 2010, 05:42 PM
So he is rubber necking? Nose is turned but not his body?



I will try some of your tips, some times it's good to hear things from other people! You think golly gee why didn't I think of that!


And I knew this was going to be confusing! He is not rubber necking. His head and body turn and then he almost leg yields REALLY fast to the wall. He literally runs side ways!

Almost like inertia keeps pulling us in the previous direction, despite the fact that we are turned and aimed at the jump!

Going Bananas
May. 2, 2010, 10:47 PM
Ride:) forward and don't bury him at the jumps.

Kenike
May. 3, 2010, 12:52 AM
Let go of that inside rein (opening a bit will help, but don't overdo it) and hold a bit on the outside rein (outside leg/outside rein) to block the shoulder. Like what CHT said.

Rather than just holding your outside leg on him, slide it back a bit and use it there while balancing with your inside at the girth. I'm not a big one on doing a down transition to rebalance, but I'm in the minority. Instead, my preference is to sit some, add a bit more leg, and settle your shoulders are well back. Close your thigh and give a definite half-halt. (make sense?) If you're more comfortable with the down transition or halt, then use it!

Good luck!

naters
May. 3, 2010, 11:45 AM
Hate to admit it, but I read the title of the thread as "Stopping my horse from bow-ing..." As in, I though he would take a bow every time he stopped.... LOL.

Sorry. Carry on :)