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bhrunner06
May. 2, 2010, 09:31 AM
I am looking for a new belly guard for my jumper. However, I do not want to spend lots of money for a girth. What is everyone's recomendations? Needs to go up to a size 54 or 56.

Roxy SM
May. 2, 2010, 10:07 AM
I have seen some things that are belly guards you can slide onto the girth you already have, but I've only ever used actually belly guard girths so I don't know if they work as well but it probably would be cheaper.

ontarget
May. 2, 2010, 10:10 AM
Ebay! I got some very nice ones for very reasonable prices.

PNWjumper
May. 2, 2010, 11:12 AM
I have several of the slide-onto-the-girth kind. I like my County Logic girths and the belly guards fit on them nicely and are kept in place by the shape of the girth (though come to think of it, I never had a problem with the one I used on one of my old mares with a regular straight girth). I prefer that setup to a full bellyguard girth since I've never been a fan of how the full belly guard girths fit my horses.

I have a couple of Devoucoux ones that look like this (except with green/yellow elastic to hold it in place):
http://cgi.ebay.com/Jumper-Belly-Guard-/280499143262?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item414f0d425e

And a couple of these:
http://www.beval.com/Products/Beval-Belly-Guard/5005014.aspx

I like the ones that are shaped like the Beval ones better. I'm not sure who made mine (I picked them up at a horseshow tackshop), but I have two different sizes and I like them a lot!

sansibar
May. 2, 2010, 02:13 PM
If you want a slide on I HIGHLY recommend Hadfield, reasonable cost. And the best part about them is they have buckles so the girth does not need to be undone to put them on and off. I think Premier Tack Outlet has one right now.

I love mine it is amazing.
:)

*Liz*
May. 2, 2010, 02:57 PM
No specific brand suggestions, just a stylist suggestion. If you're using a belly guard because the horse really needs it (in particular when the horse is jabbing his belly/girth with his front studs) stay away from the ones with a hook or ring or whatever attachment in the center.

I looked for a while before buying my belly girth, because I was paranoid my horse would get caught in the hook thingy that almost every company seems to put on belly girths. I ended up buying one with a hook because it was on sale. A few shows later my fears were realized. We were doing a 4' jumper class in a muddy sand ring, horse was trying REALLY hard, one jump felt really awkward and the rest of the course just didn't have the same gusto. After the class I dismounted and found my clip/hook (about 1-2 cm thick brass hardware) bend downward at a 90 degree angle. I gave my horse big pats and told him 'thanks for being such a trooper.' I promptly cut the nylon that was holding the hook in place and removed the whole piece. I feel really lucky my horse merely backed off a bit after getting caught in his girth; it could have been disasterous as I'm sure he hooked a stud at the about the apex his jump - if the stud would have gotten stuck instead of bending the metal in half... things could have been ugly.

woops
May. 2, 2010, 03:12 PM
I bought the amigo/ horseware for 150 @ the farmhouse
I bought it over the phone!

PNWjumper
May. 2, 2010, 04:45 PM
If you're using a belly guard because the horse really needs it (in particular when the horse is jabbing his belly/girth with his front studs) stay away from the ones with a hook or ring or whatever attachment in the center.


I was at a show where a horse went down on the landing side of the fence because a stud got caught in the ring at the center of the girth (I don't remember if it was a regular girth or a belly guard girth, but it doesn't really matter since most girths have a similar ring).

You can also simply cover the ring with a piece of duct tape or electrical tape (not to tape it to the girth, over and around the ring itself).

Brooke
May. 2, 2010, 05:30 PM
I'm still trying to figure out how a belly guard works. If the horse has his knees up in front of him, how do his hoofs get behind his brisket all the way behind the girth?

callmegold
May. 2, 2010, 05:59 PM
I'm still trying to figure out how a belly guard works. If the horse has his knees up in front of him, how do his hoofs get behind his brisket all the way behind the girth?

Plenty of jumpers don't jump with their knees up square in front of them like a hunter, they 'fold' their legs as completely as possible, which puts their feet right up next to their girths. Those are the guys who need the belly guards, and the ones who could potentially catch the ring on them.

kookicat
May. 2, 2010, 06:48 PM
It's when the horse tucks their legs up really tight. It kinda angles the hoof against that area. You can sort of see it here

http://en.labaule.com/images_annuaire/35_95_1_labaule.jpg

PNWjumper
May. 2, 2010, 07:06 PM
I have a mare that NEEDS a bellyguard in the big jumpers (you can see her jumping form in my profile pic) because she jumps as described above. And her bellyguard is severely cut up and scarred from the last couple of years! Even a horse that jumps in textbook hunter form can make an odd effort over a jump and poke themselves on occasion.

ashley.
May. 2, 2010, 07:07 PM
I know you said you didn't want to spend a ton, but for future reference in case you ever DO want to spend quite a bit, the BEST ones are by far IMO http://www.smartpakequine.com/ProductClass.aspx?productclassid=6617 and http://www.smartpakequine.com/ProductClass.aspx?productclassid=8634! And ditto what everyone said about avoiding the center ring or taping it.

Pally
May. 2, 2010, 07:22 PM
How do those of you who remove or cover the center ring of the girth attach your breastplates? Do you tape it up after? Or only tape it if you aren't using a breastplate?

We have some here (childerics (http://www.lucchildericna.com/bellypad.php)) that have a sort of embedded carabiner style snap. That lies flat so I guess it could be considered a little safer, though honestly I find them a little bit of a pain in the rear to use with certain breastplate combos.