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nlk
Apr. 29, 2010, 11:53 PM
After reading various threads on "how much is too much" and "riding routines" I have come up with a new question! (I hope or someone can just re-direct to the old thread!) OH and this months In-Stride about safe shows....

When you are at shows what/how many jumps do you take before going into the ring?

Do you do a few x rails a few 2' a few 2'6" etc and work your way up are do you do a few low and a few at height etc?....

I know for example that my horse has to jump ONE fence at height other wise he will go in the ring lazy as can be and totally get caught off guard and knock the first rail from here to the next county!

SO I come out W/T/C both directions catch a couple that are under 2'6" (like two or three) to get him moving and jumping then I will do one or two at mid height and end with one or two jumps at height....So all together maybe 6 jumps max....

Warm up day and warm up morning I catch a few low ones and if he's good buzz around the course once or twice then we are done. I see many trainers who jump the courses over and over and over. If my horse is marching quietly around I don't see why I should do more!

PNWjumper
Apr. 30, 2010, 12:45 AM
I don't usually school over jumps on schooling day. If the horse needs to see the ring and the jumps I'll hack them in the ring. The only exception is if I have a green horse showing over little jumps and I'm using the schooling day in the same way as the classes (i.e. as another chance to get around a set of jumps).

With my AO mare (typically showing in the lows/1.30m) I jump a maximum of 5 fences before walking into the ring. My goal is to do one at-height rampy oxer. So I start at 3'3" or 3'6" (with an oxer) and then go up 3 or 4 times (raising each side every other time) ending up at 4'3" or 4'6". I do, of course, warm up pretty seriously on the flat with a fair amount of lateral work since I want the horse ready to go.....I just don't want to waste her on warm-up jumps. And I never jump a vertical after the oxer.....she doesn't need it (though I often feel like the only jumper not finishing on a vertical!).

With my TB gelding I jump however many it takes to have him feel "right" before walking into the ring. At the show we did last week I jumped 4 or 5 jumps (starting at 3'6" and ending at 4'6") on the first two days of the show before walking into our 1.40m classes. On the evening of the GP he was a nutcase in the schooling ring and we jumped maybe 6 or 7 jumps before I walked the course. I jumped 3 more jumps when the horse before me walked into the ring. So a total of maybe 10 jumps? And with him I jump an oxer every time and then end on whatever the first fence in the course is. So if the first fence is a vertical we'll do an at-height vertical after our last oxer.

With my green horses jumping little jumps the number can be anywhere from zero (I'll often skip warm up jumps if we're heading into a little class that's not much of an effort for the horse) to maybe 10 if I have a particular issue we're working on.

mustangsal85
Apr. 30, 2010, 12:54 AM
Well I haven't shown for awhile, but whenever I did my old trainer was big on keeping routine. On schooling day she would give us a lesson just like at home, 20 minutes or so of flatwork followed by 20 minutes or so of jumping, starting with singles and working up to a course. It relaxed the horses into their usual work routine and got them focused. On show day, she'd have us lunge/hack (depending on what the horses needed) and then school us over single jumps. She would always end the jumping with a fence or two that was a tid bit higher than those in the class so the horses and riders were on their A game. That's her plan of action, and it worked well for me. :)

snaffle635
Apr. 30, 2010, 12:59 AM
In the warm-up area, I usually do 5 to 10, depending on how well we are doing. We do as few as possible. I show at 3', so we'll usually do one or two verticals at 2'6"ish, then a couple of oxers a little higher, then a taller vertical if needed.

supershorty628
Apr. 30, 2010, 09:19 AM
Nikki does 6 to 8 jumps in the warm up ring and very little flatwork right before my class. I take her out in the morning and do a real flat school on her, but I cannot do that just prior to going in the ring - she gets cranky about it and then I have an angry redheaded TB mare on my hands. We usually start her over a small square oxer (3' or so) and work that up to about 4'3 and then end with a very tall vertical to try and get a rail. It almost never works and that sucker has gotten very big...but we try and it does get her sharp.

pleasedaspunch
Apr. 30, 2010, 09:45 AM
When I would school right before going into the show ring my trainer would actually have me intentionally miss a distance. I was notorious for being perfect in the schooling ring and then missing in the show ring. So I would do about 2-3 perfect jumps and one oops.

Lucassb
Apr. 30, 2010, 09:49 AM
I am something of a minimalist when it comes to warm up jumps. It is very rare for me to jump more than 2 or 3 fences in the schooling area. My horse is made and brave and so all I am doing with the warm up jumps is making sure I have the right canter.

I do flat a bit prior to the first class, maybe ten minutes or so of WTC.

LShipley
Apr. 30, 2010, 10:03 AM
My mare tends to get really slow at shows so I do as little as possible before going in the ring. Lots of walking, a little trot and canter to make sure she is listening to my leg, and then we hop over 3-4 jumps. We jump 2' - 2'6, so we warm up at that height. If there are problems, like not being straight, right before our class, my trainer does like me to school that before going into the ring. That is a fine line - if we get a little tired during warm-up, we don't have a good trip, so the schooling ends up being kinda pointless.

nlk
Apr. 30, 2010, 10:09 AM
I am something of a minimalist when it comes to warm up jumps. It is very rare for me to jump more than 2 or 3 fences in the schooling area. My horse is made and brave and so all I am doing with the warm up jumps is making sure I have the right canter.

I do flat a bit prior to the first class, maybe ten minutes or so of WTC.

I'm jealous! My horse is not yet "made" although we are getting there! Hence the schooling over the course morning of and night before! He "needs" to see those fences!

I find it interesting that you have a lot of people starting off @ 3' for the warm up (granted they are ending higher too...) and only doing a few jumps before going in and jumping some big courses.

When reading about everyone's routines at home it seemed like there was a lot of time given to warm up... Ex) walk ten minutes, trot each direction for ten minutes do some laterals for ten minutes THEN canter for a few laps.... Then start with a small 2' single, work your way up to a line then a course then adjust the height...yes I am exaggerating, and yes I know that working on all those elements is important it just made me feel like I wasn't warming my horse up ENOUGH at shows!:lol:

I also got some pretty strange looks at my last show when I came out flated 10 minutes (he had already been worked in the AM and this was 10 or 11 AM) took 3 jumps and went in to the ring! And my horse was better then his previous 2 shows!

Ok I am so rambling......:eek:

DMK
Apr. 30, 2010, 10:40 AM
I'm a "less is more" person, partly because my first hunter was a bit keen, and you really didn't want to get his engine up and humming in the w/u ring. The idea was to sneak in 20 fences (4 in the schooling area and 16 for your division, this was before w/u classes!) before he woke up.

With the one I just retired, his form is pretty consistent and his jump is his jump. I usually schooled about 6 fences on him and finished with a vertical one hole higher than the class with the cooler draped over it. If I nailed that perfectly off the same lead as the first fence on course, we called it quits, otherwise gave it one more shot. That last fence was for me, not the horse. He's a careful horse and has a lot of natural backup at the fence. That makes for a winning round if there is no pilot error (hah!), but that first fence on course is an entirely different feeling from the fences in the warm up ring. Once I figured out how to create that feeling in the warm up ring, our courses improved considerably.

Hunter Mom
Apr. 30, 2010, 10:45 AM
As few as possible. Both of mine tend to get hyped when you jump, so the more we do, the more horse I have to contend with. Sometimes just one or two.

JumpWithPanache
Apr. 30, 2010, 11:24 AM
My horse was doing local one day shows last year and our routine was generally as follows:

Arrive for morning schooling, flat about 15 minutes to warm up and see the sights. School over a few fences, particularly those which might approach akwardly or be jumped from both directions. I try to not ride more than five to eight fences and halt quietly after the fence or line. Before the division, I walk her for a while on a nice loose rein, kind of taking a tour to loosen the muscles out. Then we go into the warm-up ring, trot a few minutes, canter a lap, hop over a low fence, halt, canter once fence at height to the left. Left is her harder direction and I try to reinforce landing on the left lead. If I jump her over the show fences too much she gets dull. She jumps phenomenally the first time she sees a fence.

findeight
Apr. 30, 2010, 11:48 AM
When I was doing the 3' Adults, if I had flatted for 20 minutes, jumped for 20 minutes and then gone in for 3 rounds then an under saddle??? Need a wheelbarrow to get the horse out of the ring...and they would not have had a fond memory of what happened at the show.

What I did do if I had one a little less experienced or fresh is break up the flat work with an early AM session hacking out if we were at KHP where that's an option. Or a solid 30 minutes of flat in a ring. Then back to the stall until about 30 minutes before the trip-or about 15 trips out on the gate sheet.

My standard warm up is about 10 minutes W-T-C. Few leg yields and up/down trot canter transitions. Vertical at about 2'6", halt. Come around the other direction, halt. Then raise it up and come all the way around, circle back over it. Then add the oxer once each way off a continuing canter. MAYBE raise the vertical a little above class height and take it off the same lead as the first fence to sharpen depending on how they warmed up. Then go in the ring. What is that? 6? had issues in warm up sometimes but NEVER anything more jumping was going to fix. more flatwork or a lunge, maybe. Not more jumping.

I may be different but I like mine a little sharper then ideal in my first class so I have something left for the second, particularly in the summer. Sure don't want them perfect if I am doing a warm up round-that is what they are for.

One thing...sometimes people ask about why this or that horse beat theirs when the answer is simply they presented a dull and tired horse. So overdoing it is a bigger problem then being a touch fresh.

Do your homework. Teach them at home. Get up and ride in the early AM. Don't try to fix problems in that warm up ring at a show.

imapepper
Apr. 30, 2010, 11:55 AM
I actually get anxious in the schooling ring. I prefer to do as little as possible and go :) I also try to find a quiet place to do most of my flatwork to warm up. My goal is to trot one and then canter about 3....then in I go :cool: Otherwise, both of us get fried in the warm up area. My mare and I both tend to be the nervous types :yes:

mustangsal85
Apr. 30, 2010, 01:11 PM
When I was doing the 3' Adults, if I had flatted for 20 minutes, jumped for 20 minutes and then gone in for 3 rounds then an under saddle??? Need a wheelbarrow to get the horse out of the ring...and they would not have had a fond memory of what happened at the show.



I dunno if you were referring to my post, but in case you were I was referring to schooling day not show day. :)

findeight
Apr. 30, 2010, 01:18 PM
...When you are at shows what/how many jumps do you take before going into the ring?


Sorry mustang, I thought you were referring to the OPs question. Not schooling only day.

LH
Apr. 30, 2010, 02:24 PM
I presume that you mean "what do you do in the warm-up ring before you show."

I do as little as possible to warm up - right before I go in the ring is not the time to do much "schooling" or training. We might make a point of something by maybe jumping on a little angle, or only jumping verticals, but leave the jumps for the show ring.

Do a flat to warm up the horse (10 minutes?), and then a few jumps. Too many people jump the crap out of the horse in the practice ring and then wonder why their horse rubs the jumps all the way around the ring.

for a schooling day (non-showing), my focus will be on longer flatwork, lateral work, transitions, etc. and then probably a few (10 or less) jumps -- my horse rarely gets to jump in the ring she'll show in -- this is true for most AA rated shows.

I want my horse to like her job, so I keep it as fun, relaxed and simple as possible. Sometimes, if you have a fresh one, you have to modify your routine, or else just plan to give them a lunge the next morning.

Silk
Apr. 30, 2010, 03:15 PM
I show him every fence in the warm up (the scheduled warm up in the actual ring) and then jump each to feel out how the lines ride and to allow him to feel each jump. Mine does not like surprises so we avoid them. I do not jump anything in the warm up ring while waiting for my go. I find them chaotic and mine is an older campaigner so no need.

With the baby green I again show him each fence and trot/canter each one in the scheduled warm up, then trot one and canter one in the chaotic schooling ring before going in. This is more to get his mind focused but it is NOT a training session by any means.

Prima Donna
Apr. 30, 2010, 03:32 PM
I actually get anxious in the schooling ring. I prefer to do as little as possible and go :) I also try to find a quiet place to do most of my flatwork to warm up. My goal is to trot one and then canter about 3....then in I go :cool: Otherwise, both of us get fried in the warm up area. My mare and I both tend to be the nervous types :yes:

I do the same. My mare is not a huge fan of other horses in general and especially in warm-up rings where people are coming from all different directions. I try to sneak a few jumps (maybe a few 2' verticals then a 3' oxer) in during a lull in the warm-up ring and then head into the show ring.

Dooner
Apr. 30, 2010, 04:08 PM
I actually get anxious in the schooling ring. I prefer to do as little as possible and go :) I also try to find a quiet place to do most of my flatwork to warm up. My goal is to trot one and then canter about 3....then in I go :cool:

Me too.

I was fortunate enough to finish my junior years (riding at 3' and a couple times at 3'6") with a horse that could literally walk off of the trailer on saturday, flat to work out the kinks, and trot an x on principal, and go in for a warm up round. We would MAYBE jump one 6" below height for a "hey--we're jumping" moment if he was feeling lazy or distracted (these are relative terms).

He was a horse of a lifetime and I really worked to develop the ability to do this in order to save him (in addition to not jumping at home). Ended up spoiled, and scared of the kamikazes in the schooling ring.

RomeosGirl
Apr. 30, 2010, 05:08 PM
One of the things I love about this trainer is...
We canter one off the left lead, one off the right & if all is good, she asks me if I'm good with that, & in we go....

heartinrye
Apr. 30, 2010, 05:26 PM
One :)

I get deep to a square oxer and we go in the ring :)
Benefit of having a very made and bombproof horse, who you've also owned for six years... ha!

NorthFaceFarm
Apr. 30, 2010, 05:35 PM
Depends on the fitness and experience of the horse and anxiety level of the rider, but never more than 5. For the hunters we usually trot something small, and canter a fence at the division height once off each lead. For the jumpers that are doing big stuff, a couple of fences to build up to the division height, a big airy single, and a wide square oxer.

I've only gone over that number when a really anxious rider is super duper uncomfortable after a couple of misses, but that is quite rare.

Fun Size
Apr. 30, 2010, 10:42 PM
I tend to get crazy anxiety before I go into the ring, so my warm up is only about 10 minutes of flatting to get loose and breathe, and then only 3-4 jumps at 2'. I'm only doing 2'3 or at most 2'6 at shows right now, and my horse is an old pro that really knows the game...unless I get too nervous, and transmit those nerves down the reins by getting grabby...then he will start gunning for long spots and take off, and rightly so!

The warm up routine is mostly just making sure I'm on my good canter and steering and relaxing!

sweetpea
May. 1, 2010, 09:06 AM
For my jumper less is more--- he tends to build and why waste it out in the schooling suicide ring!!!! Just Joking -- but sometimes my word!

This past year in Ocala was such a defining moment for me with knowing this horse. I had a night classic and it was technical as I will get out, but my major concern was the black liverpool with water in the ring under the lights. We rode at 9:30 Pm-- Something got goofy with order of go announcements and then we heard I was in 4 to go. Well my trainer was like Crapola---- I flatted really good by the way----- ANd my trainer gave me a liverpool to jump -- We went over 4 times total and in the ring. We went double clear and placed 4th.

Now what I know about this horse is preparation comes way before the warm- up ring --- that is not as huge as what you do during the week in classes or at home with adjustability and so forth. ANd you know I think when I am warming up perfect as sometimes I do -- I then throw in a doosey!!! So less is more for me too!!!

*jumper*
May. 1, 2010, 10:31 AM
I first try to make sure that my horse is 100% loose and ready on the flat, and since he takes awhile to get there I have to make sure I get on well ahead of my class to battle the busy warmups and get him ready. I usually start out with a medium jump and then quickly work up to height. I'll usually give him a tap with the crop in the air over the first jump or two to get him awake and motivated. From there, it's really up to me to perform. As soon as I get a really quality jump out of him and me, (usually after 5-8 jumps) I go in the ring.

To me, less is more. I don't want to waste his energy jumping around the warmup, but I do want to give him enough time on the flat to supple up. Also, I hate it when trainers try to fix things in the warmup. I know that's a whole other discussion, but besides the usual reminders (keep your head up, remember to soften your hands in the air, etc), I don't understand the need to turn a warmup into a schooling session. Definitely not the time and place :)

dani0303
May. 1, 2010, 11:44 AM
It all depends on the horse I'm riding.

On my guy, who I've had for 11 years, we do maybe 3 fences max. He knows his job, he's relaxed, and he doesn't need it

When I'm on my greenies it just depends on how they feel. Sometimes I only jump maybe 5, or it could be up to 10. Just until they feel relaxed and confident.

starkissed
May. 1, 2010, 11:48 AM
With my thoroughbred I usually only do a cross rail and then canter a bigger jump (3ftish)---and the second jump is a maybe. He can get stupid in warmup areas because he knows his job and hates schooling! When he goes in the ring he is perfect.
My other horses aren't too picky, I can practice in the warmup as little or as much as I like. But I usually keep it minimal because they all know their jobs and I can get flustered in warmup so I tend to not like schooling MYSELF because if I mess up I get all blown out about going in the ring! lol
If I get one good canter jump-even if it;s only 2'6" I quit on that.

superpony123
May. 1, 2010, 12:31 PM
i have not shown my horse yet, but i imagine he'll need a good 4-8 warm up jumps before he chills

with my old pony, i'd take a 2' vertical once each direction, then a 2'6" vertical once (or twice if he was lazy and needed to wake up) in each direction, and then a 2'6" oxer once in each direction. on the days where i knew he was just being pokey and a lazy pony, we'd put the jumps up to 3' or so and he'd wake up and go WOOSH hahah. not running but i definitely didn't need to kick him on to it. anything under 2'6'' is boring for him and so he thinks it requires no effort on his part

Carol Ames
May. 1, 2010, 12:35 PM
JOG a crossrail, canter down to a low, wide oxer, drop their head, stretch their toplines; if they are confident, canter away straight and halt on a line, we go in

Carol Ames
May. 1, 2010, 12:45 PM
Did each, the vertical and the oxer off each rein/ lead; angled each in both directions, left to right and right to left:winkgrin: one off a forward stride, then, a waiting one" now, how many have we jumped?:lol:

xxreddxheaddxx
May. 1, 2010, 12:50 PM
GM has a really good section about this in one of his books. cant remember which one. srry!

Carol Ames
May. 1, 2010, 01:17 PM
If there is a turn, I think needs a tuneup, such as, up over a vertical on the right rein, roll back to the left, angle the vertical, and gallop away;

ktm2007
May. 1, 2010, 06:44 PM
I'm a "less is more" person, partly because my first hunter was a bit keen, and you really didn't want to get his engine up and humming in the w/u ring. The idea was to sneak in 20 fences (4 in the schooling area and 16 for your division, this was before w/u classes!) before he woke up.

.

This makes me laugh! I have one like this also right now. I wouldn't call him "keen", but he has an engine so if he gets too fit, or too much adrenaline going, I have a lovely hunter who thinks the corners are REALLY FUN to play in (and his buck has sent me flying more than once, so I try to stay away from that!) For him, I do a pretty good hack in the morning in the ring. Before our classes I get him warmed up and take a few fences just to make sure I have the right canter. 5 jumps in the w/u would be max for us

My other one is as lazy as the come, so I am still in the less is more camp. If I take 10 jumps in the warm up ring, he is out of gas by our last course, especially if it is on Sunday.

goeslikestink
May. 1, 2010, 07:52 PM
After reading various threads on "how much is too much" and "riding routines" I have come up with a new question! (I hope or someone can just re-direct to the old thread!) OH and this months In-Stride about safe shows....

When you are at shows what/how many jumps do you take before going into the ring?

Do you do a few x rails a few 2' a few 2'6" etc and work your way up are do you do a few low and a few at height etc?....

I know for example that my horse has to jump ONE fence at height other wise he will go in the ring lazy as can be and totally get caught off guard and knock the first rail from here to the next county!

SO I come out W/T/C both directions catch a couple that are under 2'6" (like two or three) to get him moving and jumping then I will do one or two at mid height and end with one or two jumps at height....So all together maybe 6 jumps max....

Warm up day and warm up morning I catch a few low ones and if he's good buzz around the course once or twice then we are done. I see many trainers who jump the courses over and over and over. If my horse is marching quietly around I don't see why I should do more!



i owrk my horse in with a bit of falt work from paces from walk to trot then canter both reins then just pop over one the most 2 jumps then in the ring to or event to so whatever i only ever do 1/2 practice jumps

Highflyer
May. 1, 2010, 08:11 PM
Interesting. I event, so we don't have a lot of choices, just a crossrail, vertical, and oxer that have to be jumped in one direction only, and I don't have anyone on the ground, so I usually make do with what's set for my level--usually a smallish x, 3 ft vertical, and 3'3 oxer.

That said, I find that--both in my lessons and at shows--it takes about 10 minutes of wtc (and maybe a bit of a handgallop if there's room before xc) and then 10-12 fences for my guy to really focus on his job and be forward and ready. This is true even if he's already done a half hour of warmup/ dressage. I usually try to do a couple of rollbacks/ adjust his stride for a close or long spot, etc.--whatever is going on in the course.

But once he's in his jumping mode, he can go straight from showjumping to xc without a second warmup, even if there's a 20 minute break. Any more than that, and he needs another big canter and maybe a fence or two.

Coppers mom
May. 1, 2010, 09:38 PM
Each of my horses has a really specific routine. However, all of them get an extensive warm up on the flat. Can they go left, right, and sideways? If yes, then we jump. If not, then we work a little more. The jumping is so much easier if they're already listening.

Copper? He can do just two, and could probably do less if I didn't feel the need to get myself over a couple fences. He's 20, he knows the deal. Plus he gets pissy if he does it well and you just keep going.

My junior jumper would do just one. He was an interesting cross between a pansy and a kamakazi ride. So, if we did just one, he'd be just spooky enough not to run away when we got to the ring, but just enough into "over, under, or through" mode to actually go over everything.

My little mare does a lot in comparison. She's a cross country horse, not a show jumping horse, so I have to make sure I get her into the right frame of mind to actually go over, rather than just skim across. We'll do a jump off of each lead, get a long and a deep spot, and take a few off of angles. She's not lazy, but if something surprises her in the ring, she'll knock a rail. She has a horrible sense of self preservation, and won't stop even if she really should, so it's better to get her warmed up for things to go wrong on course so she'll go clear if it does.

Carol Ames
May. 3, 2010, 08:08 PM
On the day of a classic, or big class; I got out EARLY in the morning, before anyone else was out, so the schooling area was deserted!dragged jumps around to set up a gymnastic, after a thorough flat warm up.then, before the class only one or two jumps to "limber up" and keep the riders' eye in:lol:

DMK
May. 3, 2010, 10:11 PM
This makes me laugh! I have one like this also right now. I wouldn't call him "keen", but he has an engine so if he gets too fit, or too much adrenaline going, I have a lovely hunter who thinks the corners are REALLY FUN to play in

I used to joke that my guy was never consulted about his new career, he thought his first career was just fine. He loved nothing more than taking a bow and just powering through a turn, which wasn't any kind of surprise after no less than 3 exercise riders told me he was they favorite horse to gallop - just stand up, cross your reins and let the horse do the work.

But he was basically a kind soul and as long as I didn't go out of my way to piss him off by riding like a howler monkey or I didn't make him stay out there 5 jumps past forever, he humored me. But there really was a grace period I wasn't allowed to violate! ;)

*andi*
May. 3, 2010, 11:04 PM
My mare generally needed very few before stepping into the ring. Once each way at 2'6 vertical, up to an oxer, once or twice each way, then one or two at height and in we go.

blackcat95
May. 3, 2010, 11:23 PM
Usually 2-3 times of the ring trot and canter, and then over a full course for warmup at whatever fence height I'm doing. This has always been my routine no matter what horse I'm on, and it's worked.

eclipse
May. 4, 2010, 11:01 AM
Usually a smallish verticle each way, then a smallish oxer of each rein. Then we go to a full height oxer (square one if doing jumpers and off either a tight approach with an angle if jumpers each way or for hunters a longer straight approach) then lastly back to a large verticle of one rein. If I'm going into the jumper ring, then instead of the large verticle my trainer will generally set a tall very narrow oxer to really get my mare to snap up her legs...I try to get in tight to this fence! Then in we go!! Never any more than this. If I'm not having a good warm-up my motto is generally "bad warmup good round"! :lol: :lol: