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View Full Version : Thinline for sore back horses



forestergirl99
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:46 AM
What experiences have you had with them? Most of what I've read has been positive, but I want some more opinions. My horse has a very sensitive back and doesn't like to really round up and use his back. I know this pad helps with rounding up, but what about pain?

horsechick
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:49 AM
It will not compensate for a saddle that doesn't fit...I'm going through the same thing now. A sore back is almost always due to saddle issues-have a certified fitter check yours out.

forestergirl99
Apr. 29, 2010, 09:35 AM
It will not compensate for a saddle that doesn't fit...I'm going through the same thing now. A sore back is almost always due to saddle issues-have a certified fitter check yours out.

The saddle fits fine. It would be better if it was a tad higher off his withers, but if I have the dealer make the tree smaller it would be too tight in his shoulders. The panels however fit him very nicely. He just has like almost chronic back pain. We've had a chiropractor/ex-vet look at him, and he said that really all we can do is just constantly treat him like he's constantly about to fall apart. He's also a tense, nervous horse, and I'm sure that doesn't help. Plus he's just coming back from having inflamed high suspensorys treated, and I'm sure the pain from that just made him even more tense.

tigrrlily04
Apr. 29, 2010, 09:55 AM
A few thoughts for you :)

1) I have used the Thinline Trifecta pad with a saddle that was just slightly too wide to take up some space on the side of the tree. I didn't notice anything one way or another with my horses performance or comfort, but one thing I do like about them is that because the thinline material has a bit of friction, it really makes the saddle stay put and not shift at all.

2) Have you tried using a sheepskin saddle pad (with the sheepskin against the horses back, not a half pad placed on top of another pad)? Many sensitive backed horses respond very well to sheepskin, and like the thinline, it will keep the saddle from shifting because the wool fibers catch onto the horses coat.

3) If your saddle is just fitting your horse through his shoulder, make sure that any half pad you add won't cause the saddle to pinch.

4) Have you tried a Magnesium/Vit E/Se supplement to help with the topline soreness/tightness issues? It's one of those things like the pads...some horses respond really well to it and others aren't affected, but might be worth a shot. If you're worried about over feeding supps you could have some blood work done prior to starting it to see if your horse is defficient.

Petstorejunkie
Apr. 29, 2010, 10:09 AM
4) Have you tried a Magnesium/Vit E/Se supplement to help with the topline soreness/tightness issues? It's one of those things like the pads...some horses respond really well to it and others aren't affected, but might be worth a shot. If you're worried about over feeding supps you could have some blood work done prior to starting it to see if your horse is defficient. This is a good suggestion, but do not implement it without having your horse tested for selenium/e. too much selenium in the diet can do MORE damage than being deficient.

If you post a video of you doing some flat work, that will really help the posters here SEE what's going on and help offer solutions to meet your specific needs. I know that takes serious bravery to do, but if you keep an open mind (and if everyone on here can agree to play nice), you'll get a solution to your problem in 24hrs, instead of 6 months of guessing.


Oh, oh oh! Also look at what your horse is EATING. $1500 into lameness, reluctance to round blah, a poster on coth suggested PSSM to me. I tried the diet (we were almost there) and within 2 weeks I had a sound horse. PSSM is apparently more prevalent than I ever knew! It's a cheap thing to try too

forestergirl99
Apr. 29, 2010, 05:26 PM
This is a good suggestion, but do not implement it without having your horse tested for selenium/e. too much selenium in the diet can do MORE damage than being deficient.

If you post a video of you doing some flat work, that will really help the posters here SEE what's going on and help offer solutions to meet your specific needs. I know that takes serious bravery to do, but if you keep an open mind (and if everyone on here can agree to play nice), you'll get a solution to your problem in 24hrs, instead of 6 months of guessing.


Oh, oh oh! Also look at what your horse is EATING. $1500 into lameness, reluctance to round blah, a poster on coth suggested PSSM to me. I tried the diet (we were almost there) and within 2 weeks I had a sound horse. PSSM is apparently more prevalent than I ever knew! It's a cheap thing to try too

I actually looked into PSSM, but my trainer has seen horses with it before and doesn't think it fits him. Even if he does have it though, he already gets a low carb diet.

I'll try and get some flat work next time i got out. He actually felt really good when i last rode him. Really even and staying round through transitions etc. Its just making him round up to the right lead at the canter thats the problem. He's fine if i let him go in a more long and low frame though.

Thanks for the note about the selenium too!

MassageLady
Apr. 29, 2010, 06:39 PM
Have you considered massage therapy? Please don't ride a sore horse! this will lead to 'attitude problems' with them. Get the problem fixed. If it's muscle problems...massage WILL help!

sptraining
Apr. 29, 2010, 06:55 PM
My horse liked the SaddleRight pad. I'm also a fan of wither cut-out pads if the horse has big withers.

Try epsom salt compresses on his back too after you ride. It just helps take out some of the stiffness/soreness. If he can get a turnout too before and after your ride (or a lot of walking without a rider) that can help as well.

Also, lunging in side reins can help teach the horse how to come up through his back on his own.

Check and make sure he's not sore in his front feet, he's not out in his neck, and that he doesn't have a stifle, SI, hock soreness going on either. A lot of times back pain is secondary to other things going on - back pain is just easiest for us to see.

sptraining
Apr. 29, 2010, 06:57 PM
Also, I'd recommend speaking with a vet and doing a physical to determine where the pain might be coming from. Then perhaps talk about putting him on a regiment of Robaxin to get the pain to go away. Make sure you fix whatever is causing him pain while he's on the Robaxin so you don't go back to having the same problems you had before.

Hunter Mom
Apr. 29, 2010, 07:30 PM
I use a TL comfort pad every ride. DD uses a regular TL pad. I swear by them!

billiebob
Apr. 29, 2010, 09:22 PM
Back in September, my horse did.....something....out in the paddock and basically put his entire left side out of whack (from shoulder to hip). After a few chiro visits and daily stretches he got the all clear to start working again. I switched to a better fitting saddle but I didn't notice a big difference until adding the Thinline my boss bought me for Christmas. The first ride he was a much happier horse. He tends to be anxious and is SO not a "play through the pain" type; he's not exactly shy about telling me when life is too hard :lol: so I know he loves the Thinline.

Obviously it's not a fix if something is really bothering him, but I think they're worth it.

barnmouse
Apr. 29, 2010, 11:37 PM
Rule out physical issues first. Get a chiro to check his back.
I use the Thinline Trifecta myself. My horse likes it and so does my back.
I have an online tack store and started to sell Thinline Pads after I used them myself. You can PM if you want to try one for a week to see if that helps.

forestergirl99
Apr. 30, 2010, 12:21 AM
Have you considered massage therapy? Please don't ride a sore horse! this will lead to 'attitude problems' with them. Get the problem fixed. If it's muscle problems...massage WILL help!

I massage his back after every ride with a little liniment. I'm sure it's not as good as a trained message person, but I can't afford to get one out right now. Forest seems to really enjoy it though so I must be doing something right.

And he's really not that sore. If you run your fingers down his back he doesn't flinch at all, and we discovered based on when he's been even more sore before that riding him and really letting his stretch long and low helps him more than just not riding him. He's a really sensitive horse as well, so if something I was making it worse, he would tell me.

Sptraining- I'll try to epsom salt compressions! thanks! He is turned out 24/7. His front feet and neck are fine, but we just treated him for inflamed high suspensorys which is probably the base of his problems. now hopefully after his back gets better he'll be 100%.

Billiebob-awesome! thanks!

Barnmouse-We had our chiropractor out about a month ago. He's getting done again in May. Last time he said he was basically just tense and tight through his back. And thank you! I'll most likely be sending you a PM sometime soon!

barnmouse
Apr. 30, 2010, 01:16 AM
Sounds like he might really benefit from the pad along with some long and low exercises to lift up and strengthen his back. do you take any flatwork / dressage lessons? I think that might benefit you a lot if he's back sore due to tension. I used to live in your area. Who do you work with. PM me and we can chat.

wildlifer
Apr. 30, 2010, 10:00 AM
You need to consider the source of the pain, not just cover it with a pad. Which it sounds like you are working on doing. Please don't ride a backsore horse, it's not fair to him. It sounds like he has had some ligament issues and probably needs time to fully heal from that before you hop on him again. Tension and tightness exists for a reason, it doesn't just spring up all on its own.

dmj
Apr. 30, 2010, 06:33 PM
I've got one - it certainly doesn't hurt, not sure how much it helps. It actually does make my back feel more comfortable though :)

forestergirl99
Apr. 30, 2010, 07:12 PM
You need to consider the source of the pain, not just cover it with a pad. Which it sounds like you are working on doing. Please don't ride a backsore horse, it's not fair to him. It sounds like he has had some ligament issues and probably needs time to fully heal from that before you hop on him again. Tension and tightness exists for a reason, it doesn't just spring up all on its own.

His high suspensorys were inflamed. We injected them with steroids, then gave him a week off and bute everyday for 5 days. Exactly as our vet told us too. I then rode him 2 times and gave him another 2 weeks of light lunging and long walks bareback 2-3 times a week. Inflamed HS aren't a big problem that requires lots of time off. It's much different from a torn suspensory. It's a pretty safe bet imo that the pain in his back is caused by him being tense from the pain in his high suspensorys. He is also just a tense, nervous horse in general. It's his personality.

Also, the pad would be in edition to treating his back. More of something to help keep the soreness from coming back. He gets adjusted by the chiropractor, and I massage his back after every ride as shown to me by my chiropractor. I also do a bunch of different stretches with him to help keep him loose. The stretches are also recommended by the chiropractor. I am not just covering up the problem with a pad.