PDA

View Full Version : Anyone Know How to Make a Saddle Pad? Edit: I MADE a Saddle Pad!



indygirl2560
Apr. 28, 2010, 03:54 PM
I want to make my own baby pads but I'm not having much luck looking around the internet for patterns/examples. The pads do not have to be thick(as they'll be underneath a sheepskin pad); I'm just looking to have some cute and fun pads without shelling out $30 a pad. What material goes inside of a baby pad; anything? Am I better off just continuing to purchase already made pads?

ETA: I went to the fabric store, got the stuff, and spent the last hour and a half making a pad(a good 40 minutes of that was yelling at my sewing machine and trying to make it work)! Granted, it's not the best but I'm happy with it since I am horrible at sewing and pretty much anything to do with sewing machines!
the pad (http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=2mq0z1e&s=5)

GoForAGallop
Apr. 28, 2010, 04:12 PM
You don't need a pattern for something as simple as a baby pad, just cut out a pattern tracing one of the ones you own. The inside is just quilt batting, which you can find even at Walmart in different thicknesses.

But honestly? At $8 each (which is what I pay for my baby pads) you aren't saving any money making your own. In fact, you might even be spending MORE money! :) You have to buy a few yards of cute fabric (~$5), the batting (~$5, although what you get for that will make up lots of baby pads), the thread (~$2, but again will last a long time), and the binding for each pad. (Probably around $2-3 per pad.) So your total comes out the same as the pre-made ones, PLUS you have the extra effort/frustration of making them. :)

The only time I'd make a baby pad is if I wanted custom colors, or something along those lines. Otherwise? Cheaper (and sooo much easier!) to buy them!


Here's one for $6:
http://www.vrtack.com/baby-pad-p-1047.html

And a pack of 3 for $25:
http://www.statelinetack.com/item/baby-pads-3-pack/SLT901790/?srccode=MRSLGOOG&mr:trackingCode=CB6F08B9-9C22-DF11-AE5B-0019B9C2BEFD&mr:referralID=NA

And there are lots and lots on Ebay.

pippa553
Apr. 28, 2010, 04:53 PM
For a pattern you came make one by tracing a baby pad you already own onto a piece of paper and cut it out. Voila! instant pattern :D. Or... You can also buy a pattern from Simplicity. They have all sorts of horse themed patterns.

As far as material goes, pre-quilted flannel or cotton for the bottom of the pad if a good bet. It's generally thick enough that you won't need to buy any other type of middle batting. Then pick out your favorite print and sew together. For the edge you can make your own bias tape or buy it. It's pretty cheap.

That being said, yes, it can cost more making your own then buying premade pads. Of course if want something original and custom you have to expect to pay more, isn't that how the horse world works? lol. However if you are smart about it there are ways to save money and I've definitely made pads for under $5. Joann's routinely has 40%-50% off one item coupons, (do a search, you can get them online) which includes fabric as well as weekly sales. You can also buy remnants for 50% off there. Yard sales, thrift stores, craft fairs and ebay are also good venues for getting cheaper fabric. Good luck and have fun!

indygirl2560
Apr. 28, 2010, 05:53 PM
You don't need a pattern for something as simple as a baby pad, just cut out a pattern tracing one of the ones you own. The inside is just quilt batting, which you can find even at Walmart in different thicknesses.

But honestly? At $8 each (which is what I pay for my baby pads) you aren't saving any money making your own. In fact, you might even be spending MORE money! :) You have to buy a few yards of cute fabric (~$5), the batting (~$5, although what you get for that will make up lots of baby pads), the thread (~$2, but again will last a long time), and the binding for each pad. (Probably around $2-3 per pad.) So your total comes out the same as the pre-made ones, PLUS you have the extra effort/frustration of making them. :)

The only time I'd make a baby pad is if I wanted custom colors, or something along those lines. Otherwise? Cheaper (and sooo much easier!) to buy them!


Here's one for $6:
http://www.vrtack.com/baby-pad-p-1047.html

And a pack of 3 for $25:
http://www.statelinetack.com/item/baby-pads-3-pack/SLT901790/?srccode=MRSLGOOG&mr:trackingCode=CB6F08B9-9C22-DF11-AE5B-0019B9C2BEFD&mr:referralID=NA

And there are lots and lots on Ebay.
I want custom patterns and colors because I'm sick of the plain baby pads, and since the custom ones tend to cost a lot, I figured I could try to make my own. And I kind of want a fun project!

pippa553-Thanks! There's a JoAnn's pretty close to my house that I'll be visiting!

indygirl2560
Apr. 28, 2010, 07:21 PM
bump

anyone else?!

Saidapal
Apr. 28, 2010, 07:57 PM
SuitAbility has some great equestrian patterns. They have saddle pads, saddle bags, bridle bags, cooker, blankets, just about anything. They also have a list of where to find some of the hardware.

I made a few saddle pads. They are a lot of work but you do get exactly what you want and they are unique. In a boarding situation you know which one is yours. I bought a few less expensive pads and put those under my custom ones to save on wear and tear.

For filling you can use quilting batting.

Their website is www.suitability.com

Have fun!

pippa553
Apr. 28, 2010, 08:35 PM
Oops! I meant SuitAbility as well, not Simplicity... sorry about that. :yes:

indygirl2560
Apr. 28, 2010, 11:40 PM
What colors should my next pad be?! :D

pippa553
Apr. 29, 2010, 01:21 AM
Lol.. wow that was quick! Did you end up going to Joann's? They have such fun patches there, I'm always picking them up and putting them in weird spots. I have a few that are destined for blankets.. as soon as I can bring them home!

Anyway.. good job on your pad!! :D:yes::D

DressageGeek "Ribbon Ho"
Apr. 29, 2010, 01:36 AM
I think it's fabulous!

pintopiaffe
Apr. 29, 2010, 01:47 AM
I am SO jealous.

Does a plain old regular sewing machine work?

I have a very, very bad pad addiction, but cannot (thankfully) at the moment find anything I *want* less than $50. And WILL not pay that much.

How hard was it?

Um, how hard is it for someone who has never used a sewing machine yet? :uhoh: :lol:

I just need very light pads to put OVER the half-pad to protect the saddle flaps from sweat. But--I have a Passier VSD, so weird shape.

ddashaq
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:23 AM
What sewing machines do you all use? I am looking to get one strictly for making horse projects but I have no idea where to start!

lesson junkie
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:49 AM
That looks great! I tried to do pads for C'mas gifts last year, but my mother's 1940's era Singer was overfaced-the needle kept sticking in the layers of fabric/quilting. What machine did you use?

Bluey
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:55 AM
You made a real neat pad!:cool:

Next time your sewing machine balks, consider using a whip lightly behind your leg, works better than hitting it with a hammer.;)

midkniggit
Apr. 29, 2010, 10:49 AM
Nice job! That is absolutely adorable. I think you just motivated me to pull out my machine and fabric stocks.

For the folks asking about sewing machines...
I make a fair bit of my own stuff, and the best sewing machines you can get are not the new ones, unless you want to shell out for a professional model. I have a 1979 Kenmore and have made a 12x12 canvas tent using it - up to 8 layers of 10oz canvas on certain points. I've also used it to sew multiple layers of garment leather, with no problems. If you look around you can find older heavy duty machines cheaply. I also have an early 1970's Singer that's very heavy duty as well, and I bought it for $10, and then paid $30 to have it tuned up.

indygirl2560
Apr. 29, 2010, 10:56 AM
Thanks everyone! It was pretty easy, and this is coming from someone who is sewing challenged! I've used my sewing machine once before and that was 5 years ago! It's a regular old sewing machine(I'll take a look at the brand later) but it was very finicky about the thread and it took me 40 minutes to get it working properly(probably since I lost the threading directions and was using a trial and error process!).

I bought a fabric that already had the diamond pattern with some fuzzy stuff attached(no idea what the fuzzy stuff is!) and laid one of my pre-made baby pads on top of it in the store to see how much I needed. Then I found the trim; luckily I went with the double folded trim(called "tape" in the store even though it's not sticky) instead of the single folded, because it looks and feels sturdier once sewn on the pad. And finally I went to the belting section and picked out my color for the girth straps and saw some cute embroidered butterflies(iron on type).

At home, I traced my baby pad onto the new fabric with a pencil and cut it out. Then I placed a small section of the trim on(maybe an inch or two) and secured it with a safety pin(I had no clothing pins!). The trim was the trickiest part because the pad is curved and I had to do the trim one section at a time. I only got one package of trim which was bad because I just barely made two pieces go all the way around the pad! After the trim was on, I cut the girth straps and used my old pad as a reference for length and placement. Finally I ironed on the butterflies and the pad was complete!

I might try to make a pad that I have to add batting to for my next project!

ETA: My sewing machine is a Brother. I have no idea what model it is but I bought it six years ago for $100 at a discount store and looks pretty simple(no computerized things). I was worried that it couldn't handle the girth straps but it went through the fabric fine.

Bluey
Apr. 29, 2010, 11:40 AM
You really did a great job, especially being your first one.:)
That butterfly was a neat touch too.

Now we would like to see a picture with it in use, on a horse?:yes:

Guin
Apr. 29, 2010, 11:43 AM
Pictures! Pictures!

pippa553
Apr. 29, 2010, 12:11 PM
I agree that the older machines seems to be so much better. I used my mom's 25 year old Singer for years with no problem. That said I needed to buy my own after a while and ended up with a Janome Sew Precise. I love it!!! I had originally bought a Singer and ended up fighting it 75% of the time. I ended up trading it in towards the Janome at the sewing shop and the guy told me they really weren't the same anymore, good for doing a hem here and there but not really cut out for anything heavy duty. :no:

JumpWithPanache
Apr. 29, 2010, 01:29 PM
What a great topic! I am really hoping to make some of my own baby pads this summer b/c critter does not like thick saddle pads under her sheepskin pad and I want girth loops. I have a 1970s Bernina that my mother used in her HS Home Ec class, her mother bought used from the school, gave to my mom years later, and my mom gave to me about two years ago when she got her nice quilting machine. She's done everything from sewing clothes to machine quilting up to twin-size bed quilts. I've made slip covers for my dining room and also several quilts with it. Best sewing machine ever!

What fabric do you use for the bottom layer? Muslin, heavy cotton, ?? Thanks!

amastrike
Apr. 29, 2010, 01:38 PM
I buy ready-made boring pads (like the $10 Dover pads, or anything that is suitable and cheap), and buy ribbon or whatever to dress them up. You can do ribbon (and piping, if you like) very easily, just sew it down around the edge. MUCH easier than making an entire pad from scratch (although yours turned out great!).

The other thing you can do is buy enough pretty fabric to cover the pad, lay it over the pad, and sew it down. I recommend doing concentric "U" shapes on each side, starting from the smallest one and working your way out to minimize wrinkling. Then sew it down around the edges, trim the excess, and sew ribbon over the edge to hide the ragged edge of fabric and make it prettier.

indygirl2560
Apr. 29, 2010, 03:27 PM
You really did a great job, especially being your first one.:)
That butterfly was a neat touch too.

Now we would like to see a picture with it in use, on a horse?:yes:
Thanks! I'm probably going to use it tomorrow or Saturday! I'll try to get some pics of it in use ;)

Jumpingwithpanache-I didn't use a separate fabric for the underside; the bottom looks the same as the top minus the girth loops and butterflies. Because it's a baby pad, which I just use to look nice and keep my sheepskin pad clean, it doesn't need to be thick. My example pad was a Lettia baby pad and they only used one layer of material.

LovelyBay
Apr. 29, 2010, 04:38 PM
I made this one last summer when I was unemployed! But I did it all by hand because it didn't have a sewing machine.

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/photo.php?pid=30103922&id=149200080

It looks so nice, that I've never used it! But I triple stitched everything, so I bet the pink ribbon will last longer than the pad! Oh and my fingers were so sore from hand sewing it that I had to wrap the tips with duct tape because I didn't have a thimble!

indygirl2560
Apr. 29, 2010, 05:04 PM
I made this one last summer when I was unemployed! But I did it all by hand because it didn't have a sewing machine.

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/photo.php?pid=30103922&id=149200080

It looks so nice, that I've never used it! But I triple stitched everything, so I bet the pink ribbon will last longer than the pad! Oh and my fingers were so sore from hand sewing it that I had to wrap the tips with duct tape because I didn't have a thimble!
Wow! That looks like it came from a store! After the first breakdown, I was praying that my sewing machine would keep working! I just started a new pad and it's already causing trouble with the thread again...

foundationmare
Apr. 29, 2010, 06:54 PM
Indygirl, very nice job!

I am so excited to see this thread with the link to SuitAbility. I have been considering making custom horse clothing for quite a while and this may spur me into action. I've been a seamstress for well over 40 years, although I've been dormant for about 5 years now. These kinds of projects should be fairly simple for a newbie, although the trim can be a challenge.

I've made tons of saddle towels for use on the racetrack, but would like to expand into fun coolers (because fleece has evolved beyond basic colors) and quarter sheets.

I agree that an older, basic machine, with metal parts, is ideal. Unfortunately, it's difficult to find people who can maintain/repair the older models. But if you have a good one, treat it lovingly, because it's worth it's weight in gold! My grandmother taught me to sew when I was a weanling, and that was on her trusty treadle Singer that she used for 70 years or so! She made all of her clothing on that machine, much of mine as I was growing up, all of her slipcovers, upholstery, drapes and curtains. That was one beautiful machine!

Misty Blue: good one!!

I can't believe that a thread about SEWING has had this much response. Cool.

pintopiaffe
Apr. 30, 2010, 02:10 AM
Ama--that's EXACTLY what I was thinking of tonight, looking at the lovely, but RED saddlepad that came with a saddle I bought. I hate red. Nothing I own (ponywise) looks good in red.

So I wondered about that.

Maybe even *I* could do that...

nomoregrays
Apr. 30, 2010, 08:22 AM
I like the shaped dressage pads - I bought a couple of them several years ago when I was in Germany. I wanted underpads for them so that I wouldn't have to wash them as often. With the SuitAbility pattern, I managed to make 2 pads experimenting with different types of batting and fabrics. The key for quilting the pad is to use a "walking foot" which helps feed the fabric layers evenly past the needle.

For fabrics, I have different types of cotton and cotton blends in Hawaiian prints.

indygirl2560
Apr. 30, 2010, 11:07 AM
Well I made another one! This time I took the quilted fabric and sewed a printed fabric on top, then added trim and girth loops. Again, not fantastic but I'm amused! :lol:

JumpWithPanache
Apr. 30, 2010, 11:12 AM
Foundationmare: my parents have my dad's mother's Singer treadle machine at their house! The older machines are awesome, and my Bernina gets an annual check up at the Bernina dealer. They love to see that machine come in!

Ok, so pre-quilted fabric, whatever trim, and nylon webbing for the girth loop. Did I miss it or is there a recommended thread type? Good idea to just use my existing pads as the template, and you're right... same fabric top and bottom.

LovelyBay
Apr. 30, 2010, 11:44 AM
I've made two custom coolers for my horse! They weren't hard at all! The hardest part was finding fleece wide enough, which there wasn't, so I have to piece to pieces together (which wouldn't have been a big deal if I hadn't chosen plaid material!)
I even made a "hug" type neck for my cooler because it's really cold here in the winter and I wanted to make sure she was more covered.

islandrider
Apr. 30, 2010, 12:03 PM
I've made about 15 saddle pads. Tie dyed heavy cotton duck, used Imperial fleece. I used the skito-equipedic style pad as my template, even made my own inserts. I made a few prototypes too-pretty interesting designs. I sold a bunch of the pads, took custom orders for some, but ended up moving my shop out of the house and quitting because of a long-standing arm/wrist prob that was getting exarcerbated. If anyone would like to use some imperial fleece for the underside of your homemade pads, let me know. I bought a whole lot of it, still have some. PM for pricing. Good luck!