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View Full Version : What do you think of this jump?



AmandaandTuff
Apr. 28, 2010, 02:23 PM
This is my 6 year old mare. She was off until a couple weeks ago recovering from injury. I finally got the okay to work her, so I'm flatting only under saddle and longeing over fences. She's always had nice legs and a nice tuck.

So what do you think of the form?

This is a 2'6" jump, the white post has nail in cups and I couldn't find a hammer. Next time I'll get the regular standards out. She keeps her legs neat unders addle and doesn't take off quite as early with rider assistance. She rounds up more over a bigger fence. I do small shows and small events on her. Just making sure she's not a horrible open show hunter with her over fences form.

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_066.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_067.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_068.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_069.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_070.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_071.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_072.jpg

tidy rabbit
Apr. 28, 2010, 02:33 PM
I think it would be easier to tell if she were free jumping through a shoot without the lunge line interfering.

Perhaps it's the lunge line that is making her head come up like that?

At the 2'6 / 3' local level safe and fun are what matter! :)

She looks like a nice mare.

vxf111
Apr. 28, 2010, 02:59 PM
That setup strikes me as neither altogether safe nor conducive to allowing the horse to jump well. And not surprisingly, she's jumping quite awkwardly. I think you need a better setup to get a real sense of her ability.

Riley0522
Apr. 28, 2010, 03:46 PM
She looks cute and more than capable to show on the local circuit, but the setup looks like an accident waiting to happen. Ditto the previous poster on maybe trying a chute.

Also, probably wouldn't be jumping her period this soon coming back from an injury. She's probably not in shape after only 2 weeks, and you're just asking for another injury. I know that's not what you asked, just my opinion.

joiedevie99
Apr. 28, 2010, 03:57 PM
She looks quite awkward and uncomfortable. Hard to say if she's weak from the time off (likely) or harmed by the setup, or if its how she jumps. She looks like she's coming off the ground very weakly, hardly pushing. She's high and tense in the neck, and doesn't seem to have much range of motion to get her front end out in front of her- although she seems to hold her legs even. The landing shots make me think foot pain or back pain based on the tension, but it could also be the result of her lack of hind end power and not pushing across the jump causing her to land in a heap.

She looks like a she could be a very cute local level mare if you either leg her up slowly until she is strong enough, or get her issues sorted out- no way to tell which it is from stills. I too would be curious to see her loose instead of on the line. Maybe thats the entire issue and it all would sort itself out if she were moving more forward to the fence and in a straight line?

AmandaandTuff
Apr. 28, 2010, 04:36 PM
I had her one a line, when I let her loose in the arena she usually goes ripping around full tilt. This was a first to say lets see how she's doing. I have old pictures going under saddle at 3', I'm too ashamed of my equitation to post them. Someone suggested the side pole to help the line over the standard.

I'm gonna wait a while and do a better set up. I don't want her ripping around in there on her own right now. I'm riding her probably 3 days a week at the moment.

goeslikestink
Apr. 28, 2010, 04:50 PM
This is my 6 year old mare. She was off until a couple weeks ago recovering from injury. I finally got the okay to work her, so I'm flatting only under saddle and longeing over fences. She's always had nice legs and a nice tuck.

So what do you think of the form?

This is a 2'6" jump, the white post has nail in cups and I couldn't find a hammer. Next time I'll get the regular standards out. She keeps her legs neat unders addle and doesn't take off quite as early with rider assistance. She rounds up more over a bigger fence. I do small shows and small events on her. Just making sure she's not a horrible open show hunter with her over fences form.

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_066.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_067.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_068.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_069.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_070.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_071.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/free_072.jpg

why jump a horse thats just reocvered from an injury - if a leg injury you have to do in hand walking then build it up to short walks then long wlaks then working on ground poles which i can give you a plan but must be passed via your vet and then build the leg up from the foot up
this mare is taking off on her pasterns in 1st piccy and not from her feet shes looks un balanced and its not the ideal set up
if your re habbing from a leg injury it takess time and patience rush thehorse like this and you will have another injury or the old injury wont have the strrenght as with any injury if the legs you got to build up the good tissues and mussles to support the bad tissue and mussles if its a tendon or a ligament or anythign to do with the legs

*jumper*
Apr. 28, 2010, 05:35 PM
I agree that a jumping chute would allow her to better show off her natural form. She looks darling and safe, but it wouldn't really be fair to judge her in this situation.

AmandaandTuff
Apr. 28, 2010, 05:52 PM
I'll set up the chute when I'm positive she's not going to blast around full speed.

Her injury was a muscle that was sore in her back from a fall on the ice over winter. I couldn't ride throughout winter. I've had her adjusted, massaged, and fully vetted and approved for full work. I didn't think longeing over 2'6" twice was a large work load.

AmandaandTuff
Apr. 28, 2010, 09:07 PM
Ignoring the crappy chute (which she kept pushing poles off of, hence the line and me running and snapping pics), how does she look?

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d77/DontBelieveInMe/freejump_080.jpg

fordtraktor
Apr. 28, 2010, 09:14 PM
Longeing over fences is, in my mind, harder on a horse than riding over fences, because you are asking the horse to jump on a circle which puts a lot of strain on the legs.

The mare looks sweet and like a trier. She does not look particularly talented or athletic, but these pictures are hardly fair to her because they are not set up to show off form. Few young horses are going to look good jumping on a circle with no placement fence, as they don't have the time to think about what they are going to do with their legs. A chute is better because it makes the decisions for them -- you will notice that people take pictures of the last jump, not the placer crossrail, for that very reason.

My advice -- Stop the longeing over jumps, get her fit, and take some pictures in two months when she's actually got a decent chance of showing herself off to some advantage.

Riley0522
Apr. 28, 2010, 09:38 PM
I'll set up the chute when I'm positive she's not going to blast around full speed.

Her injury was a muscle that was sore in her back from a fall on the ice over winter. I couldn't ride throughout winter. I've had her adjusted, massaged, and fully vetted and approved for full work. I didn't think longeing over 2'6" twice was a large work load.

Lunging over 2'6" twice (although it's clearly been more than twice now since you read this and then lunged her more tonight over larger fences as evidenced by the new pictures) isn't really a large work load if she's fit, but after having months off and only being back 2 weeks, it's probably not easy on her by any means. I'd be way more worried about her hurting herself jumping out of shape than blasting around off the lunge; you turn the horse out, don't you?

Running a half mile isn't necessarily hard work for most people, but if you hadn't exercised in 6 months it probably would be, right? It's your horse and you can do as you wish, but having rehabbed a horse from months off, my vet recommended taking it pretty slowly, and no jumping for atleast a month or two of consistent flat work to build up back/hind end muscles which are integral to good jumping form.

asterix
Apr. 28, 2010, 10:32 PM
You want people to tell you she looks great. She doesn't look great right now. Just leg her up, give her time, and when you feel she's really able to work at her previous level, take some pics of her then.

I have a horse who is truly a lovely, athletic jumper (at least up to 3'9" or so, can't say we've done much beyond that). One of the biggest names in my discipline has told me what a terrific jumper he is.

He's been off for several months, and is a big teenaged guy. I just started jumping him again after 6 weeks of trails, conditioning sets and flatwork.
He felt pretty crappy, and I imagine he looked that way too.

I'd never expect a pic of him from this week to garner oohs and aahs on a bulletin board.

Just spend another month or two working on her strength and balance, adding trot poles, hill work, etc. Then reintroduce jumping. After she's really back to where you feel she is at her best, THEN try posting critique pics.

Posting more pics of different arrangements now isn't going to change where she is right now.

jse
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:14 AM
I have to agree with the posters who say this is a disaster waiting to happen. The horse looks like a dinosaur (for lack of better words)because the lunge line attached to it's head is not allowing it to use it's body the way it should (not trying to be mean, just an honest opinion since you asked for a critique). Please, if you want quality feedback on your horse's jumping, build a jump schute and do it correctly. Or if you do want to lunge the horse over a jump, use some cavalletti standards so that the lunge line doesn't get in the way of your horse.

HuntJumpSC
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:48 AM
I'm in agreement with everyone else here. You're not doing your mare any favors, and she looks unbalanced and uncomfortable. Back off and leg her up properly, and either get some pics of her freejumping in a chute, or of you actually jumping her.
There's no way on this green earth I'd do this to my filly. Ever. Longeing over ground poles, and maybe some low cavaletti, yes, when she's mature enough. But 2'6" and an oxer? No way.

FineAlready
Apr. 29, 2010, 01:37 PM
Yes, I agree. I strongly suggest that you stop lunging your horse over jumps like that. You are restricting her head and neck as she jumps, which can't possibly be good for her back injury. The lunge line very frequently appears to be caught on the standard, which is incredibly dangerous. If you must lunge over something, it is much safer to lunge over caveletti or small jumps built with those plastic block things.

All of that said, it probably would be a good idea to back the heck off of the jumping until this mare is back in full flat work for some time. And then, I'd be jumping under saddle or freelunging (i.e., no lunge line attached to her face!) over very, very small (under 2 feet) jumps.

It really makes me sad that you are asking your mare to do this. For her sake, I really do hope that you take everyone's advice. She's a cute enough mare. It would be a shame to ruin her.

hntrjmprpro45
Apr. 29, 2010, 03:13 PM
I won't comment on the lunge line (I think plenty of people have covered that issue), but if you want to set up a true jumping chute and are worried about her blazing around, I can offer a little advice there. Lead her up to the chute (rather than chasing her in with a lunge whip) at a walk, jog beside her for a few steps (establish a trot), then release her into the chute. This is a common practice for young horses who tend to blow around the arena like a nut. If you set up a simple grid (maybe a cross bar, 2-3 strides, then a vertical) she will be able to trot in and canter out comfortably. You can use a plain leather strap or lead line looped under the chin of the halter (So when you are ready to release her it will just slide out without snagging fingers etc). If you watch some free jumping videos from reputable barns, you should be able to see how it works. Most likely your horse will canter out of the chute and stop at the other end. If you are still concerned about her having too much energy, you can lunge her a bit before hand.

NeedsAdvil
Apr. 29, 2010, 04:22 PM
Ditto the previous poster on maybe trying a shoot.



Now, now, I wouldn't shoot the poor thing...maybe just find it a new job. :lol::lol:

tidy rabbit
Apr. 29, 2010, 04:31 PM
Damn you all are harsh. It's not *THAT* bad. Just not really set up for success.

enjoytheride
Apr. 29, 2010, 04:52 PM
I lunge over fences all the time but I could never do it holding a camera and it does take some skill. You have to be really quick on your feet. If I want to evaluate true form I set up a chute. If I'm working a green horse in a controlled area and I want to sneek in a 2 foot fence as part of the warmup lunge then I do that. I never use PVC because it teaches bad habits.

Since she has been out of work and was injured I would stop lunging her over fences period. Post those under saddle photos of her or wait until she's more fit.

Riley0522
Apr. 29, 2010, 05:42 PM
Now, now, I wouldn't shoot the poor thing...maybe just find it a new job. :lol::lol:

hahaha good catch! didn't even notice, now I'll have to go fix it :)

Summit Springs Farm
Apr. 29, 2010, 05:55 PM
WOW, people, I think she asked how the mare looked over the fence, not if you all thought it was OK to jump on a lounge line.
I have in the past jumped a horse on the lounge and had no problem, I used cavalettis, I actually thought that it helped that horse learn to judge his own distance without the help of the rider.
Because once we started him over fences under saddle he seemed to always find his own distance.
Frankly, I think she is very correct in her style of jumping, her head is alittle awkward but the rest looks great. she is rocking back, tucking her front end and her hind end is exceptional in my opinion.:)

GatoGordo
Apr. 29, 2010, 09:12 PM
Well, you seem to be fishing for compliments, not actually asking for input.

With regards to lungeing over fences, I don't think that people would be stressing that so much if you hadn't told us that the mare is TWO WEEKS off of a prolonged down period for an injury. What we're trying to tell you is that two weeks is TOO SOON to be jumping a horse in hand, on a lunge, with a rider, or in a chute, when the horse has not had consistent exercise in months (and even being ridden 3 days a week is marginal for getting a big horse in shape for jumping, excluding Thoroughbreds who get themselves in shape by looking at an arena). Even if she is fit enough aerobically to canter over jumps a few times, her general muscle tone for carrying herself and jumping has been weakened from time off and she is more apt to hurt herself again if asked to suddenly use muscles she has not had to work in months. Would you ask a person who had just been laid up for months to go to the gym and start back up lifting at the same weight they had been lifting before? No, you'd be asking for a re-injury.

Maybe your vet should have explained things a bit more clearly, but when a horse is cleared for full work and they have been off for a long time, that generally means working up gradually to their previous work load, not putting the horse right back in full work. One metric I heard from a vet was one week getting back in to shape for every week off (up to a certain point - a few months may be sufficient to get a horse in shape for w/t/c/light jumping unless the horse has been on strict, prolonged stall rest).

If I am misinterpreting what you said about your mare's injury and lay-up, please correct me. I don't think anyone is trying to attack you or your horse, we're just concerned that by asking her to do too much, too soon you are setting her up for injury and yourself up for disappointment. :)

vxf111
Apr. 29, 2010, 09:51 PM
Frankly, I think she is very correct in her style of jumping, her head is alittle awkward but the rest looks great. she is rocking back, tucking her front end and her hind end is exceptional in my opinion.:)

For reals?? If so, I can help you find loads and loads and loads of "exceptional" horses.

I am sure she's a perfectly nice horse but the setup is not helping and she looks very average to me in those photos. Neither a trainwreck nor Rox Dene.

fordtraktor
Apr. 30, 2010, 08:05 AM
Well, you seem to be fishing for compliments, not actually asking for input.

With regards to lungeing over fences, I don't think that people would be stressing that so much if you hadn't told us that the mare is TWO WEEKS off of a prolonged down period for an injury. What we're trying to tell you is that two weeks is TOO SOON to be jumping a horse in hand, on a lunge, with a rider, or in a chute, when the horse has not had consistent exercise in months (and even being ridden 3 days a week is marginal for getting a big horse in shape for jumping, excluding Thoroughbreds who get themselves in shape by looking at an arena). Even if she is fit enough aerobically to canter over jumps a few times, her general muscle tone for carrying herself and jumping has been weakened from time off and she is more apt to hurt herself again if asked to suddenly use muscles she has not had to work in months. Would you ask a person who had just been laid up for months to go to the gym and start back up lifting at the same weight they had been lifting before? No, you'd be asking for a re-injury.

Maybe your vet should have explained things a bit more clearly, but when a horse is cleared for full work and they have been off for a long time, that generally means working up gradually to their previous work load, not putting the horse right back in full work. One metric I heard from a vet was one week getting back in to shape for every week off (up to a certain point - a few months may be sufficient to get a horse in shape for w/t/c/light jumping unless the horse has been on strict, prolonged stall rest).

If I am misinterpreting what you said about your mare's injury and lay-up, please correct me. I don't think anyone is trying to attack you or your horse, we're just concerned that by asking her to do too much, too soon you are setting her up for injury and yourself up for disappointment. :)

Exactly the above. We aren't trying to be mean, we are trying to say that longeing over fences should not be on the agenda for a horse recovering from a layup. Longeing is very stressful on legs because they are going in small circles. Add jumping on top of that and it is harder on the horse than light riding -- not something that you want to be doing with a recovering horse, as it may cause her to reinjure herself.

Your horse looks sweet and cute, but you really can't tell much about her jump here. That's why everyone is focusing on the longeing over jumps issue.