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View Full Version : For those whohave lived/ridden in Europe



BlueDutchess
Apr. 28, 2010, 11:36 AM
Our family would really like to go back to Europe permanently. I am a native Texan/ Dutch husband , but have lived in the Netherlands ( Holland ) with my husband before....

My question for today :
For my fellow hunter folk ,, what euro countries actually do hunters? I have akways heard that not very many do . I am a true 40+ yr hunter person period. Dressage and 3 day events are just not up my alley. I was able to do jumpers occasionally but at my age now :no:

What I do know -

Holland does not . you either have dressage, 3day or Jumpers , At least that is all I could find in 3 years there PLEASE correct me if I am wrong -Step daughter rides dressage horses there also who , of course I have asked about this many times . Strangely I know nothing about Belgium or Germany's show hunter possibilities, neither does she .

I have spoken to a large group of show folk in Scotland and England who Do do hunters and were very welcoming ,although is somewhat different from ours but I could manage this.

My husbands job pretty much allows us to be in any EU country we woudl like to locate to.. So if anyone has ridden show hunters in any of the EU countries or knows of some one who has please do pass it along , thanks

Heineken
Apr. 28, 2010, 12:05 PM
I rode in France in 1996-1997 and there were only dressage or jumpers where I was riding. Sorry :(

loshad
Apr. 28, 2010, 12:29 PM
I've lived and ridden in a couple of different European countries and neither did hunters. My impression is that it's very much an American discipline aside from what the Brits do -- although that has always sounded like it's different from what we do here. When I live overseas I just putter around in jumpers.

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Apr. 28, 2010, 12:38 PM
"Hunters" in the American sense are a strictly (VERY strictly) American discipline. Aside of Canada, hunters are not shown outside of the US. In GB, there are hunter classes, but they are much more heavily based on the field hunters we use most often in fox hunting. The classes are not run the same as they are here, and they aren't judged the same. I would go out on a limb to say the divisions are not even comparable.

If you're looking to return to central/western Europe, your best bet is to start doing jumpers.

kenyarider
Apr. 28, 2010, 01:37 PM
I have lived in England. They have both show and working hunters, as well as dressage, jumpers, eventing, hunting, and team chases. The working hunter classes are similar to US hunter derby classes. Which means the jumps are more interesting than in traditional US hunter classes. Go to the UK, live in Wiltshire, near Swindon. It's less expensive than Gloucester or Surrey. You can reach most major show facilities easily from the West Country and there are many wonderful hunts where you can ride over the countryside with great people. They don't kill foxes anymore in England so if you don't like the 'blood' aspect of hunting, you don't have to worry about that. You can show in your local village show, riding club, and unaffliated or affliated shows up to national level in hunters there. Good luck and enjoy yourself.

3eme
Apr. 28, 2010, 02:31 PM
"Hunters" in the American sense are a strictly (VERY strictly) American discipline. Aside of Canada, hunters are not shown outside of the US.

This is just not true. Hunters exist in France, and are based on hunters in the USA. There are both 'style' classes (horse is judged) as well as equitation (O/F only) classes. The discipline was 'imported' largely by a French woman who spends time on the two continents, so it really does look a lot like hunters in the USA. The only problem is that there are not tons of shows. While most barns are jumper barns, you can find hunter barns, especially around Paris. I know of one in particular with an exceptional (bi-lingual) coach.

I don't know if you read French, but here is the link to hunter part the French equestrian federation's website :

http://www.ffe.com/ffe/Disciplines-Equestres/General/Hunter/Presentation-du-Hunter

BlueDutchess
Apr. 28, 2010, 02:40 PM
Thank you guys for the great responses ,,, you are very right about the Scot/ English versions ,, when I spoke to them at length with pics on a show forum over there they said my horses were more of what they called a riding stamp(1 heavy Am TB's and 2 App. AQHA's all 16.1 or over but should still be just fine if they were already over fences horses while their pics def looked like very heavy field hunters ... The jumps are more natural and appear to be lower , they also do this thing with their tails I found interesting ( at least in Scotland ) where they pull the tail hairs at the head and dock the hair straight across at about hock length,, if I am understanding what they told me correctly ?? Oh well the world is an interesting place...Maybe mama could still mess around with a jumper lol that is after I recover from pulling my lower back over a 3'6" oxer last week :uhoh: jeez time just gets away from you. These are 3 homebreds i have had forever ,one is a nice broodmare, the other a mare and a gelding and I finally have the money and my husband wants me to take them with me. I can keep the broodmare or any of them at my husbands grandparents farm in Holland for good or if something should happen .There is a place within 100 miiles of me here that will do the entire thing from start to finish that wasnt nearly as expensive as I thought . It is a sentimental thing from my family's breeding . We had such great times showing over the years and they and me are the last ones left ,,, I didnt take them last time. I know you all think I am just crazy.

I just KNEW this was going to be the French assessment lol :lol: because that was where I wanted to go most of all .

It'll probably be the UK ..

BlueDutchess
Apr. 28, 2010, 02:46 PM
This is just not true. Hunters exist in France, and are based on hunters in the USA. There are both 'style' classes (horse is judged) as well as equitation (O/F only) classes. The discipline was 'imported' largely by a French woman who spends time on the two continents, so it really does look a lot like hunters in the USA. The only problem is that there are not tons of shows. While most barns are jumper barns, you can find hunter barns, especially around Paris. I know of one in particular with an exceptional (bi-lingual) coach.

I don't know if you read French, but here is the link to hunter part the French equestrian federation's website :

http://www.ffe.com/ffe/Disciplines-Equestres/General/Hunter/Presentation-du-Hunter



3eme!!! you posted before I could and i just didnt see ,,maybe there IS some hope,, yes I can read french ,,, I am going to check this out very carefully ,,, thank you I may just be getting back to you on that bi lingual coach .. husband is an aviation mechanic so Paris was in contention ,, my daughters absolute dream . Hubby still thinks UK ,, we are having such a tug o war on this ,,

MHM
Apr. 28, 2010, 03:12 PM
3eme, do they use hunter judges from France? Or do they ever bring in American judges?

Just wondering. ;)

3eme
Apr. 28, 2010, 03:23 PM
Hey MHM

For the most part they use French judges, but I think sometimes there are judges from the US too. Someone told me that at the Championships last year there was an American judge (totally forgot her name, but I recognized it at the time).

OP : let me know if you need more info / contacts in the future. :)

Equilibrium
Apr. 28, 2010, 04:51 PM
If you're going to the UK, check out the riding clubs. No pressure, a variety of classes, and good fun. But still competitive too. The show hunters are not typically American, but still with your TB's you can do the lightweights.

Terri

andy.smaga
Apr. 29, 2010, 01:05 PM
3eme, do they use hunter judges from France? Or do they ever bring in American judges?

Just wondering. ;)

There is, at least, one American who judge in France: Julie Ulrich, she spend most of the year in France.

Op, here is a links you could find interesting:
http://www.hunterclubdefrance.com/

SmplySweet1021
Apr. 29, 2010, 01:12 PM
Currently in the NL...no hunters here :-( very sad indeed!! Though I must say the shows that I have seen run VERY efficiently!

That said I was at a barn last week and they have trained & sold a few horses as hunters though not sure if they were sold to the US or what. Very small/private barn outside of Utrecht near De Bilt.

*JumpIt*
Apr. 29, 2010, 01:50 PM
So does that mean all of the imported "hunters" were actually bred for Dressage, jumpers, or Field Hunting?

SmplySweet1021
Apr. 29, 2010, 02:12 PM
I would say so. I almost rode for a large Jumper breeder here and he would free jump his horses and then see which would be good for the jumpers & which can go to the US to be trained for the hunters....but technically all the horses were bred to be Jumpers.

mroades
Apr. 29, 2010, 03:53 PM
Hmmm, maybe I could puy my petit peau de francais to work and judge hunters in Paris....yes, I could be talked into that...lol

Haalter
Apr. 29, 2010, 04:00 PM
Someone please correct me if I am remembering this wrong, but...I believe it is in England, where there is some version of "hunter" shows where the judge rides each one of the horses over a course? Or did I just imagine this? What a fun job that would be!

MHM
Apr. 29, 2010, 04:16 PM
What a fun job that would be!

Fun? It might depend on the horses! :lol:

lyrical
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:27 PM
Yes, my friend on Wales has told me about the judges who hop on the hunter horses and test their "rideability". Can you image that done in the US???

Jewels09
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:32 PM
you will find that even the european countries that do offer hunter classes run the classes completely different then here in america. I lived over in Germany for 5 years and their hunter classes came about during the time I was there. very few shows offered the class and there were always restrictions on who could enter based on your points and rider ranking. I think you would be very frustrated showing in the hunter classes in europe. My advice is to do the equitation. I don't know about Holland but in Germany they offer Stilspring- based on your style. This equitation type class was offered at 3 levels. A, L, M or 1.10m 1.20m 1.30m. It is a fun class and they offer it at almost every show in Germany. Look for something like that in Holland. Good luck and have fun! Most importantly be open minded!

Jewels09
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:36 PM
Just re read your entire post- I thought you were moving to Holland. If you want to do Hunters your best bet is probably Great Britain.

EqTrainer
Apr. 29, 2010, 08:47 PM
So does that mean all of the imported "hunters" were actually bred for Dressage, jumpers, or Field Hunting?

For the most part, yes.

Coreene
Apr. 30, 2010, 12:52 AM
Lived in both Holland and England (who family is from Holland), and if I was picking between England and France them hands down it would be France. I'd go to Holland though. And to the poster who mentioned De Bilt? Made me all :sadsmile: for Amersfoort and riding in Den Treek. It just won't work out for me to go this spring and I miss everyone. :cry:

SmplySweet1021
Apr. 30, 2010, 01:27 AM
Lived in both Holland and England (who family is from Holland), and if I was picking between England and France them hands down it would be France. I'd go to Holland though. And to the poster who mentioned De Bilt? Made me all :sadsmile: for Amersfoort and riding in Den Treek. It just won't work out for me to go this spring and I miss everyone. :cry:

I'm Dutch (grew up in the US) and am back for a year for my Masters in Utrecht. I am going to miss it but I terribly miss Lexington KY too! It's always the you are here you want to be there and vice versa! I unfortunately don't ride anymore (injury) but have a friend that is leasing a horse at a beautiful private farm in De Bilt. I am jealous...I admit!!

Equilibrium
Apr. 30, 2010, 02:22 AM
Someone please correct me if I am remembering this wrong, but...I believe it is in England, where there is some version of "hunter" shows where the judge rides each one of the horses over a course? Or did I just imagine this? What a fun job that would be!

In Ireland the riding judge is only in the flat class, not over fences. I was a riding judge for my friend Carol at the big riding club festival one year. Rode 74 horses in one day - I was freaking exhausted! I rode one group of large colored horses - holy crap I felt like a fly on their backs. Dont' know if I was supposed to do this, but I came back and told everyone of them their horses were lovely. I even rode one 4yo who was having her second show. She took off bucking like a lunatic but since the guy had put on a neck strap, no disasters prevailed!

Terri